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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Senior Gains Web Development Experience at Red Hat Internship Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 7:27pm
Story Raspberry Pi (2 and 3) support in Fedora 25 Beta! Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 7:23pm
Story Open-source storage that doesn't suck? Our man tries to break TrueNAS Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 6:37pm
Story Google open sources the code that powers its domain registry Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 6:34pm
Story Meet Maui 1, the Slick New Hawaiian Netrunner Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 6:21pm
Story i.MX6-based Mini-ITX SBC does triple displays Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 6:19pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 3:59pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 3:59pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 3:54pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2016 - 3:54pm

Has Linux lost the Unix Philosophy?

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How closely is that followed today? Relatively well, so far as using text stream goes. A majority of Linux programs continue to use plain text configuration files, which means that users can easily edit them, using the text editor of their choice.

However, there are a few exceptions. GRUB 2, for example, discourages manual editing, automating new entries after a new kernel or operating system is added. Similarly, Systemd uses binary files for its logs, while KDE's Akonadi, by making use of a database, ensures that any failure will be catastrophic, and unrepairable manually.

Such changes are usually made in the name of efficiency. All too often, however, the efficiency is gained by interfering with the do-it-yourself ethos that should almost be a fourth pillar of the Unix Philosophy.

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Also: DevOps toys, looking at new and old tools

Early Fedora 26 Features To Talk About: PHP 7.1, OpenSSL 1.1 & More

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Red Hat

While Fedora 25 isn't even being released until mid-November, with now being past the change completion deadline for F25 and Rawhide continuing to move along, early Fedora 26 features are beginning to be talked about.

Some of the latest self-contained proposals for Fedora 26 include PHP 7.1 and BIND 9.11. Given their routine package updates and non-controversial components, they should be approved easily by FESCo. PHP 7.1 will be released before 2016 is through and is one of the updates I'm looking forward to.

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Debian News

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  • GNOME Shell and Mutter Get Ready for GNOME 3.22 Desktop's First Point Release

    The GNOME Project prepares to unleash the first of two point releases for their latest and most advanced GNOME 3 desktop environment, version 3.22.1, so they're currently updating various core components and applications.

    GNOME 3.22 was officially unveiled last month, on September 21, 2016, and it brought numerous interesting new features and improvements. The first point release, GNOME 3.22.1, should improve your GNOME 3.22 experience, as well as to fix some of those annoying issues and annoyance that you've reported lately.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 19
  • GTK+ 4.0 Toolkit Development Is Warming Up

    With GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 having been released at the end of September, developer focus is beginning to shift to GNOME 3.24 or in the case of GTK+ developers it's about GTK+ 4.0 development per the toolkit's new development process.

    GTK+ 4.0 was opened for development in Git a few days ago. While not any exciting changes have yet landed in Git master, this branch is prepping the removal of GTK 3.x deprecated APIs and this branch will remove the deprecated style API.

Fedora 25 Beta Ready, HandyLinux Pas Parle Anglais

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Fedora 25 Beta was released today for early testers bringing Wayland by default and new server SELinux troubleshooter. Phoronix is already looking ahead to Fedora 26. Elsewhere, HandyLinux has decided to drop its English support and Bruce Byfield asked if Linux has lost the Unix philosophy.

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Clear Linux Continues To Maintain Slight Graphics Lead Over Ubuntu 16.10

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Back in April I did tests showing how Intel's Clear Linux distribution showed much potential for HD/Iris Graphics performance, something that intrigued many Phoronix readers since Clear Linux would generally be seen as a workstation/cloud/container-optimized Linux distribution and something with not much emphasis on the desktop or gaming. Those earlier tests were with Ubuntu 16.04, bur with Ubuntu 16.10 coming out this week, here are some fresh tests of Clear Linux and Ubuntu Yakkety Yak on an Skylake HD Graphics system.

For curiosity sake, I ran some fresh Ubuntu 16.10 vs. Clear Linux (10820) benchmarks on the same Core i5 6600K system with an MSI Z170A GAMING PRO motherboard, 16GB DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 256GB TS256GSSD370S SSD. The mid-range i5-6600K is equipped with HD Graphics 530.

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Linux Foundation and Linux

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  • Linux 5.0 Kernel is Coming in 2017

    It's very likely that the Linux 5.0 kernel will debut at some point in 2017. Linux creator Linus Torvalds hasn't yet officially set a date, but that's not quite how he works or how the Linux development process pushes releases.

    In a Google Plus post Torvalds noted that after the Linux 4.8 release, we're now half-way between Linux 4.0 and 5.0.

    Torvalds isn't just counting the release number here either. Linux 3.20 was renumbered as Linux 4.0 during it's development cycle in early 2015.

  • How Linux has influenced modern IT

    A quarter of a century is a long time in IT, but Linux, which has turned 25, is now at the heart of many hugely successful enterprises.

    Martin Percival, senior solutions architect at Red Hat, said: “Linux was regarded as an alternative to proprietary Unix. But RHEL switched it to becoming an alternative to Windows Server.”

  • AllSeen Alliance Merges into Open Connectivity Foundation for IoT

    The AllSeen Alliance is merging with its erstwhile rival the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF). The two efforts will now operate under the Open Connectivity Foundation as a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project.

  • NVDIMM Updates For The Linux 4.9 Kernel
  • Btrfs Gets Fixes For Linux 4.9, Linux 4.10 To Be More Exciting

Linux Graphics

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GNU/Linux Desktop

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  • System76 Launches New Ubuntu-Powered Lemur Laptop with Intel Kaby Lake CPUs

    Today, October 11, 2016, System76, a US-based computer manufacturer specializing in the distribution of notebooks, desktop and server computers powered by the Ubuntu Linux operating system, launch a new model of their famous Lemur laptop.

    If you're currently enjoying your excellent Lemur laptop from System76, you should know that a better version is now available, featuring 7th generation Intel i3-7100U or i7-7500U Kaby Lake processors that provide stunning performance and much faster Intel HD 620 graphics. The new Lemur laptop also features up to 32 GB of dual-channel DDR4 RAM.

  • System76 updates its affordable Ubuntu Linux 'Lemur' laptop with Intel Kaby Lake

    Dell recently updated its XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop with Kaby Lake processors. While that company's laptop is beautiful, it is also very expensive. For developers and home users looking for a solid laptop running Ubuntu Linux, System76's 'Lemur' has historically been a great value. Not only is the affordable machine both powerful and well supported, but it is built like a tank too.

    Today, System76 updates the aforementioned Lemur with Kaby Lake processors. While Dell's XPS 13 starts at $949, the Lemur begins at a much more reasonable $649.

    That starting price gets you a solid machine. It has a Core i3-7100U processor, 4GB of RAM and a 500GB HDD. If you want more power, storage, or memory, you can configure to your heart's content. Not everyone needs the most hardcore specifications and unlike Dell's machine, the Lemur will better meet the needs of those on a budget.

  • Apple Mac shipments take a beating in the third quarter as PC shipments decline

    Sales of Windows PCs fared better than Apple Macs during the third quarter this year.

    Third-quarter PC shipments declined by 3.9 percent compared to the same quarter last year, but Mac shipments dropped by 13 percent. PC shipments totaled 68 million units, according to IDC.

    The declines weren't as bad as expected, and were roughly 3.2 percent ahead of IDC's initial projections, the research firm said.

    In the top five PC companies, fourth-placed Apple registered the largest decline, with the 13 percent drop in Mac shipments. Apple's Mac sales totaled 5 million units during the quarter, declining from 5.76 million units in the same quarter a year ago.

  • PC industry is now on a two-year downslide

    The state of the PC industry is not looking great. According to analyst firm Gartner, worldwide PC shipments fell 5.7 percent in the third quarter of 2016 to 68.9 million units. That marks the "the eighth consecutive quarter of PC shipment decline, the longest duration of decline in the history of the PC industry," Gartner writes in a press release issued today. The firm cites poor back-to-school sales and lowered demand in emerging markets. But the larger issue, as it has been for quite some time, is more existential than that.

Security News

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  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Systemd and Ubuntu users urged to update to patch Linux flaws

    Linux users should beware of a recently discovered systemd vulnerability that could shut down a system using a command short enough to send in a tweet and Ubuntu users should update to new Linux kernel patches affecting supported operating systems.

    SSLMate founder and Linux administrator Andrew Ayer spotted the bug which has the potential to kill a number of critical commands while making others unstable, according to Betanews.

  • Microsoft: No More Pick-and-Choose Patching

    Adobe and Microsoft today each issued updates to fix critical security flaws in their products. Adobe’s got fixes for Acrobat and Flash Player ready. Microsoft’s patch bundle for October includes fixes for at least five separate “zero-day” vulnerabilities — dangerous flaws that attackers were already exploiting prior to today’s patch release. Also notable this month is that Microsoft is changing how it deploys security updates, removing the ability for Windows users to pick and choose which individual patches to install.

  • Ministry of Defence CIO – defending the data assets of the nation

    An interesting example of knowing what is actually important, such as being ‘secure’ does not mean pulling up drawbridges and never talking. It does seem possible that the MoD has lesson it can teach industry in building security defences in depth, using a wide range of tools, that then map onto the future world of mobile and cloud infrastructures.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Fedora News: Release of Beta and Other News

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Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Build your own Raspberry Pi tornado warning system

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At 4:30 in the afternoon on November 15, 1989, an F4 tornado ripped through Huntsville, Alabama killing 21 people. It could have been much worse save for the quick thinking of the people running the after-school program at Jones Valley Elementary. They took the children under the stairs as soon as the power went out. They survived, though the top floor was torn from the building. A mother out front who had come to pick up her child was among the 21 casualties.

That was my brother's school. My church and several others were destroyed. My route to school changed for months while they rebuilt and cleared the area. These are the sorts of stories you collect living in the #1 place for tornadoes per capita. And it is these stories that instill a healthy respect for tornadoes, and heeding tornado warnings.

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Couchbase and the future of NoSQL databases

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Well, I've built and led developer communities for 10+ years at Sun, Oracle, and Red Hat, so I have experience in leading crossfunctional teams to develop and execute strategy, planning, and execution of content, and marketing campaigns and programs. I've also led engineering teams at Sun, and I’m a founding member of the Java EE team.

At Couchbase, a developer advocate helps developers become effective users of a technology, product, API, or platform. This can be done by sharing knowledge about the product using the medium where developers typically hangout. Some of the more common channels include blogs, articles, webinars, and presentations at conferences and meetups. Answering questions on forums and Stack Overflow, conversations on social media, and seeking contributors for open source projects are some other typical activities that a developer advocate performs on a regular basis.

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7 Linux command line tools you didn’t know you need

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The Linux world offers an incredible range of free and open source tools to do everything you can think of and lots of things you probably haven’t ever thought of. In this roundup we highlight seven command line utilities you probably haven’t run into before and we’ve got everything from monitoring file system events to running re-attachable ssh sessions to printing banners.

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27 Open Source DevOps Tools In 7 Easy Bites

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I recently wrote an article featuring 25 DevOps vendors worth watching. However, in the world of DevOps, there are an awful lot of good tools that don't really have a vendor attached, and I thought it was time to give the open source tools their due.

While I wrote that there are tools that don't have vendors, there are vendors that are attached to some of these open source tools. Those vendors provide development support, along with, in some cases, customer support and even proprietary versions of some of the tools that exist alongside their open source cousins. As long as there was an open source version that wasn't "crippleware," it was eligible for the cut.

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Black Lab Linux Goes Commercial Due to Lack of Funding, netOS Discontinued

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Today, October 12, 2016, Softpedia was informed by Robert Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software about some important changes made to the Black Lab Linux and netOS projects.

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KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Gets Its First Point Release with Many Wayland Improvements

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Today, October 11, 2016, the KDE Project proudly announced the general availability of the first point release of the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment, versioned 5.8.1.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.