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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 21 Open Source Projects for IoT Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 8:06pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 7:09pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 6:55pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:49pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:48pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:42pm
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:41pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:40pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 20/09/2016 - 1:40pm

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Tuesday's security updates
  • [Mozilla:] Cybersecurity is a Shared Responsibility

    There have been far too many “incidents” recently that demonstrate the Internet is not as secure as it needs to be. Just in the past few weeks, we’ve seen countless headlines about online security breaches. From the alleged hack of the National Security Agency’s “cyberweapons” to the hack of the Democratic National Committee emails, and even recent iPhone security vulnerabilities, these stories reinforce how crucial it is to focus on security.

    Internet security is like a long chain and each link needs to be tested and re-tested to ensure its strength. When the chain is broken, bad things happen: a website that holds user credentials (e.g., email addresses and passwords) is compromised because of weak security; user credentials are stolen; and, those stolen credentials are then used to attack other websites to gain access to even more valuable information about the user.

    One weak link can break the chain of security and put Internet users at risk. The chain only remains strong if technology companies, governments, and users work together to keep the Internet as safe as it can be.

  • IoT malware exploits DVRs, home cameras via default passwords

    The Internet of Things business model dictates that devices be designed with the minimum viable security to keep the products from blowing up before the company is bought or runs out of money, so we're filling our homes with net-connected devices that have crummy default passwords, and the ability to probe our phones and laptops, and to crawl the whole internet for other vulnerable systems to infect.

    Linux/Mirai is an ELF trojan targeting IoT devices, which Malware Must Die describes as the most successful ELF trojan. It's very difficult to determine whether these minimal-interface devices are infected, but lab tests have discovered the malware in a wide range of gadgets.

  • Someone Is Learning How to Take Down the Internet

    First, a little background. If you want to take a network off the Internet, the easiest way to do it is with a distributed denial-of-service attack (DDoS). Like the name says, this is an attack designed to prevent legitimate users from getting to the site. There are subtleties, but basically it means blasting so much data at the site that it's overwhelmed. These attacks are not new: hackers do this to sites they don't like, and criminals have done it as a method of extortion. There is an entire industry, with an arsenal of technologies, devoted to DDoS defense. But largely it's a matter of bandwidth. If the attacker has a bigger fire hose of data than the defender has, the attacker wins.

  • Internet's defences being probed: security expert

    A big player, most possibly a nation state, has been testing the security of companies that run vital parts of the Internet's infrastructure, according to well-known security expert Bruce Schneier.

    In an essay written for the Lawfare blog, Schneier, an inventor of the Blowfish, Twofish and Yarrow algorithms, said that the probes which had been observed appeared to be very carefully targeted and seemed to be testing what exactly would be needed to compromise these corporations.

    Schneier said he did not know who was carrying out the probes but, at a first guess, said it was either China or Russia.

    Pointing out that the easiest way to take a network off the Internet was by using a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, he said that major firms that provide the basic infrastructure to make the Internet work had recently seen an escalation of such attacks.

  • Hackers smear Olympic athletes with data dump of medical files

    Hackers are trying to tarnish the U.S. Olympic team by releasing documents they claim show athletes including gymnast Simone Biles and tennis players Venus and Serena Williams used illegal substances during the Rio Games.

    The medical files, allegedly from the World Anti-Doping Agency, were posted Tuesday on a site bearing the name of the hacking group Fancy Bears. “Today we'd like to tell you about the U.S. Olympic team and their dirty methods to win,” said a message on the hackers' site.

    The World Anti-Doping Agency confirmed it had been hacked and blamed Fancy Bears, a Russian state-sponsored cyber espionage team that is also known as APT 28 -- the very same group that may have recently breached the Democratic National Committee.

7 KDE Apps You Should Know About

Filed under
KDE

KDE regularly polls as the most popular desktop environment for Linux. However, because more desktops use GNOME applications, to many users KDE might as well be a separate operating system. That is unfortunate, because some of the most feature-rich free applications are designed for KDE.

I am not referring here to utilities like the Kate text editor, the Konsole terminal, or even the Dolphin file manager. All of these are well-integrated into KDE and have all the features any user could want, but most of them are matched by GNOME counterparts. Rather, I am thinking of applications that are outstanding by any measure, the best of breed in their software categories.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Lubuntu 16.04 - good operating system with a bit of disappointment

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The reason? I am not so fond of an LXDE desktop environment that isn't an integrated desktop environment per se, but rather a collection of different small tools under the same roof.

But anyway I thought there should be a review for this distribution, especially because it is in the Top-20 of Distrowatch rating.

As happened multiple times before, the trigger was a request from my customers. One of them ordered a disk with Lubuntu 16.04 operating system. You can order your personal copy of Lubuntu operating system too!

Read more

Linux helped me grow as a musician

Filed under
GNU
Linux

In the early days of Linux it was possible to do high-quality audio recording, but it was often difficult to set up. Then Ubuntu Studio made it a lot easier.

Back in 2000-2002, after studying B2B marketing, I started to work at an engineering office. Aside from marketing and sales stuff, I was in charge of optimizing the number of workstations and licenses to match our real needs and cut costs.

We had many expensive CAD workstations that were mainly running Unix at the time, from vendors such as SGI, IBM, and Sun, with costly CATIA, Euclid, and Unigraphics software.

I was a computer geek but because of my studies in marketing, I didn't have the opportunity to play with Unix systems. Then I discovered GNU/Linux, and I downloaded some available distributions, including Red Hat, Mandrake, and Debian. These distros were not easy to install like they are today, and often even getting the network working was difficult, but having a terminal on a cheap laptop was great.

In 2004 I adopted Ubuntu, a version of Linux that was good for new users.

Thanks to Framasoft.org, I already was using a lot of open source applications before switching to Linux, such as Firefox, OpenOffice, Gimp, and Inkscape.

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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME 3.26 Linux Desktop to Be Dubbed Manchester, After GUADEC 2017's Host City

Filed under
GNOME

Now that the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) event for the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.22 desktop environment has come to an end, the GNOME Project is already planning for the next year's installation.

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Knox Tizen Wearable SDK (beta) out for Wearable Apps Developers

Filed under
Linux

The Samsung wearable devices are growing by the day in numbers and so too will the need for some apps which would aid them achieve maximum users experience. Apart from individuals, companies are adopting the smartwatches in their business processes. In order to fast track and ease the process of developing softwares, Samsung has released a Software Development Kit for its wearables known as Knox Tizen Wearable SDK

Read more

Yuppity Yep — Meet the Official Mascot of Ubuntu 16.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

As with previous mascot animal designs you can expect to see this ‘Yak’ logo used to promote Ubuntu 16.10 during its last furlong of development, on posters, social media posts and, of course, the traditional official release t-shirt.

Admittedly the official mascot logos aren’t as synonymous with Ubuntu as the rest of Ubuntu’s branding — logo, color scheme, default wallpaper, etc. — but a new release of Ubuntu still gets a companion animal logo. The Yakkety Yak bucks no trends.

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Multiwireless IoT home gateway has Linux and Android BSPs

Filed under
Android
Linux

Via unveiled three new Linux- and Android-based IoT devices, including a multiwireless home gateway, a telestrator, and a wireless display system.

Via Technologies announced a Via IoT Studio series of products for smart home control, building automation, educational applications. The Via IoT Studio line is headlined by a “Via Alegro 100” multiprotocol home gateway router with support for WiFi, Bluetooth, ZigBee, Z-Wave, Ethernet, and KNX communications. The customizable gateway is supported with Android 4.0 and Linux 3.0.8 BSPs (board support packages).

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Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.6 with Initial Linux Kernel 4.8 Support, More

Filed under
Linux

The monthly maintenance update of the popular, open-source, and cross-platform VirtualBox virtualization software from Oracle is here, VirtualBox 5.1.6, available now for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows platforms.

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Debian Linux Bug Squashing Party to Take Place September 23-25, 2016 in Salzburg

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Now that the final release of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system is getting closer and closer, the Debian developers are gathering together later this month in Salzburg, Austria, for a bug squashing party.

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NetBeans Java IDE Might Become An Apache Incubator Project

Filed under
OSS

A proposal posted today is looking to shift the NetBeans integrated development environment from being an Oracle project to one within the Apache incubator space.

Geertjan Wielenga, an Oracle employee who serves as the project manager for Oracle JET and NetBeans, posted a proposal today looking to offload NetBeans from being the open-source IDE maintained at Oracle to becoming "Apache NetBeans."

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Also: Apache NetBeans Incubator Proposal

Ubuntu SDK 4.1.0 IDE Is Powered by Qt Creator 4.1, Adds LXD-Based Backend

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu SDK developers Benjamin Zeller and Zoltán Balogh are announcing the release of the Ubuntu SDK 4.1.0 IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for the Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Remix OS for PC 3.0.204 Update Adds Android Security Patch for September 2016

Filed under
OS
Android

Today, September 13, 2016, we are being informed by Jide Technology about the availability of the latest OTA software update for the Remix OS for PC Android-x86-based operating system.

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10 Uses for an Old Android Tablet

Filed under
Android

Your old Android tablet just isn't good enough to be your daily driver anymore, but it isn't valuable enough to trade in or sell on eBay. However, that doesn't mean you have to throw it in the trash or leave it languishing in a drawer.

From turning it into a security camera to making it a smart remote or handing it off to your kids, here are 10 great uses for an old Android tablet.

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KaOS 2016.09 Is Here as the First Linux Distro to Offer KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Beta

Filed under
OS
KDE
Linux

Today, September 13, 2016, the KaOS development team had the great pleasure of announcing the availability of a new, updated installation medium of their KaOS Linux computer operating system.

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Android-x86 6.0 Is Here If You Want to Run Android 6.0 Marshmallow on Your PC

Filed under
Android

Today, September 13, 2016, Android-x86 developer Chih-Wei Huang was happy to announce the general availability of the final release of the Android-x86 6.0 operating system for personal computers.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS Brings ARM and EXT4 Improvements, Updated Drivers

Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.5, renowned kernel developer and maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the availability of Linux kernel 4.4.22 LTS Read more

Tor Project Releases Tor (The Onion Router) 0.2.8.8 with Important Bug Fixes

The Tor Project announced recently the release of yet another important maintenance update to the stable Tor 0.2.8.x series of the open-source and free software to protect your anonymity while surfing the Internet. Read more

SODIMM-style i.MX7 COM features dual GbE, WiFi/BT, eMMC

Variscite’s Linux-driven “VAR-SOM-MX7” COM is shipping with an i.MX7 Dual SoC, WiFi and BLE, dual GbE, and optional eMMC and extended temp. support. Variscite’s VAR-SOM-MX7 follows many other Linux-ready computer-on-modules based on NXP’s i.MX7 SoC, which combines one or two power-stingy, 1GHz Cortex-A7 cores with a 200MHz Cortex-M4 MCU for real-time processing. While most of these offer a choice of a Solo or Dual model, and the NXP/Element14 WaRP7 offers only the Solo, the SODIMM-style VAR-SOM-MX7 taps the dual-core Dual. Unlike most of these modules, but like the WaRP7 and the CompuLab CL-SOM-iMX7, Variscite’s entry offers onboard WiFi and Bluetooth, in this case Bluetooth 4.1 with BLE. Read more

Security News

  • Security advisories for Monday
  • OpenSSL security advisory for September 26
    This OpenSSL security advisory is notable in that it's the second one in four days; sites that updated after the first one may need to do so again.
  • Who left all this fire everywhere?
    If you're paying attention, you saw the news about Yahoo's breach. Five hundred million accounts. That's a whole lot of data if you think about it. But here's the thing. If you're a security person, are you surprised by this? If you are, you've not been paying attention.