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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 64-bit Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 ships for $25 to $30 Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:38pm
Story Panasonic Toughpad Rugged Tablet Muscles into Android Space Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:34pm
Story LXQt Spin Proposed For Fedora 26 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:11pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 8:05pm
Story Raspberry Pi 1 and Zero: Hands on with Manjaro ARM and PiCore Linux Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:34pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:32pm
Story Raspberry Pi 3 Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:29pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 1:16pm
Story Linux Kernel and Linux Event Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:05am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:03am

Android Leftovers

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Android

Security News

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Security

Ubuntu-Based Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers Distribution Is Out for Linux Gaming

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Ubuntu

It's been almost three months since we last heard something from TheeMahn, the developer of the Ultimate Edition (formerly Ubuntu Ultimate Edition) operating system, a fork of Ubuntu and Linux Mint, but we've been tipped by one of our readers about the availability of Ultimate Edition 5.0 Gamers.

The goal of the Ultimate Edition project is to offer users a complete, out-of-the-box Ubuntu-based computer operating system for desktops, which is easy to install or upgrade with the click of a button. It usually ships with 3D effects, support for the latest Wi-Fi and Bluetooth devices, and a huge collection of open-source applications.

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What Is Tor Browser? How To Install And Setup Tor In Linux?

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Linux

​Tor is a free software that helps to many users to keep their privacy safe on the Internet. When you are surfing the web, your privacy is very weak and your data are vulnerable. It is because many websites get data from you using cookies or scripts (javascript).

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more

Some Basic Linux Commands For Beginners

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Linux

​I know that the terminal may look scary at the beginning but it’s so useful you can do a lot of things like rename files easier than a graphic interface, watch or stop system processes, start or stop system services. Commands are the great way to understand Linux and learn so much about it. In Linux, there exist a lot of commands. The list that I'm presenting here includes the most common Linux commands for beginners.

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more

BakAndImgCD 21.0 Is Available for Download, Based on 4MLinux Backup Scripts 21.0

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Linux

Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia today about the general availability of BakAndImgCD 21.0, a new major build of his independently-developed 4MLinux fork designed for data backup and disk imaging operations.

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4 open source alternatives to Trello that you can self-host

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OSS

Trello is a visual team collaboration platform that was recently acquired by Atlassian. And by that, I mean as recently as today Monday, January 9 2017.

I’ve been using Trello as a board member of DigitalOcean’s community authors and started using it to manage a small team project for a non-profit organization a couple of days ago. It’s a nice piece of software that any team, including those with non-geeky members, can use comfortable.

If you like Trello, but now want a similar software that you can self-host, or run on your own server, I’ve found four that you can choose from. Keep in mind that I’ve not installed any of these on my own server, but from the information I’ve gathered about them, the ones I’m most likely to use are Kanboard and Restyaboard.

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Min Browser Muffles the Web's Noise

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Reviews
Web

Min is not a full-featured Web browser with bells and whistles galore. It is not designed for add-ons and many other features you typically use in well-established Web browsers. However, Min serves an important niche purpose by offering speed and distraction-free browsing.

The more I use the Min browser, the more productive it is for me -- but be wary when you first start to use it.

Min is not complicated or confusing -- it is just quirky. You have to play around with it to discover how it works.

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10 ways to put your old Android phone or tablet to use

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Android

So, you have a new phone that doesn’t leave your side. Sure, you can get rid of the old one through a resale site or donation, but there is another option: give it a second life with a different purpose.

An old phone or tablet can be a great hand-me-down device for a child, family member, or can serve as your dedicated smart TV companion. I’ve also repurposed old gear to work as a security camera or an always-ready eReader. So before you put it on the auction block, consider one of these uses instead that may add some value and ease of use to your digital life.

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Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics, and Games/High-End PCs

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux Kernels 4.8.16 and 4.4.40 LTS Bring Btrfs and CIFS Fixes, Updated Drivers

    Two new Linux kernel releases arrived this past weekend, for the Linux 4.8 and long-term supported Linux 4.4 series, sporting pretty much the same improvements and bug fixes.

    Linux kernels 4.8.16 and 4.4.40 LTS are out, as announced by renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, and they're here three weeks after the release of the previous maintenance updates, namely Linux 4.8.15 and Linux 4.4.39 LTS, due to the obvious Christmas and New Year's holidays.

  • Mesa Patches For Bringing Intel Haswell To OpenGL 4.2

    Igalia developers have been doing a lot of work this past week from seeing their FP64 Haswell patches merged, issuing new Ivy Bridge FP64 patches for testing, Float64 support for the Intel Vulkan driver, and related work. The newest from Juan Suarez Romero on behalf of Igalian developers are the 11 patches needed for taking Intel's Mesa driver for Haswell to the OpenGL 4.2 milestone.

  • It's Official: Sid Meier’s Civilization VI Is Coming to Linux and SteamOS, Soon

    Aspyr Media have officially announced today, January 9, 2017, the upcoming availability of the Sid Meier’s Civilization VI turn-based 4X video game for the Linux and SteamOS platforms.

    Developed by Firaxis Games and published by 2K Games, Sid Meier’s Civilization VI launched for the Windows and Macintosh operating systems last year on the 21st of October. It already won the "Best Strategy Game" award during the The Game Awards 2016 annual awards ceremony.

  • Aspyr Media Officially Confirms Bringing Civilization VI To Linux
  • RadeonSI Gamers: What Linux Games Still Don't Work For You?

    Valve appears to be ramping up their open-source AMD Linux graphics driver work, but they are looking for more Linux games that currently don't work atop the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.

  • Talos Secure POWER8 Linux Workstation With Fully Open Source Firmware

    Raptor Engineering is working and crowdfunding a high-end power8 based desktop computer with zero proprietary firmware blobs in the Talos Secure Workstation. Traditionally IBM, Oracle(Sun), Intel/AMD and others ruled this market segment. But now there is competition to Intel for a desktop computer.

  • The POWER8 Libre System Looks Set To Fail, Now There's An AMD Libre System Effort

    It doesn't look like the Talos Secure Workstation will see the light of day with it's crowdfunding campaign ending this week and it's coming up more than three million dollars short of its financing goal. Now there's another effort to offer a libre system but using off-the-shelf x86 hardware.

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Kodi 18 Media Center to Be Dubbed "Leia," In Honor of the Late Carrie Fisher

    To celebrate 40 years of the Star Wars saga, the Kodi developers announced earlier today the codename of the next major release of their open-source and multiplatform media center.

    As many of you probably know from our regular reports, Kodi 17 "Krypton" is currently in heavy development with a first Release Candidate snapshot out of the door at the end of 2016, but the team was already looking to codename the next major version, Kodi 18. In early December, they asked the community to vote for the Kodi 18 code name, which should have start with the letter L.

  • GENIVI Alliance's GENIVI Vehicle Simulator

    By providing a realistic simulated driving experience, the new GENIVI Vehicle Simulator (GVS) assists adopters to develop and test the user interface of an open in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system safely, thereby identifying and executing necessary design changes quickly and efficiently.

  • PlayStation 2 Emulator 'PCSX2' New Version Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    PCSX2 is a PlayStation 2 emulator for Windows and Linux. It was started by the team behind PCSX (an emulator for the original PlayStation) back in 2002, and as of early 2012 development is still active. The emulator achieved playable speeds only by mid-2007 and subsequent versions have improved speed and compatibility making it both the ultimate solution for PS2 emulation and the instrument to keep and preserve the PS2 legacy in the modern world. Though not yet perfect the program can successfully emulate most commercial PS2 games at playable speeds and good visuals (often better than the original PS2). The project is open source, and it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v3. Currently up to 3 cores are supported (2 cores and an additional one if the new MTVU speed hack is used). To make PCSX2 efficiently use 4 or more cores will require major code changes. PCSX2 only uses 2 cores,so if you have more the CPU usage will be way less 100%. Even if you have exactly 2 cores, the emulator will not cause 100% CPU usage because of the way threading works. This does NOT mean PCSX2 isn't using the full power of your CPU, it is normal.

  • Go paperless: How to install and use LogicalDOC for document management in Linux
  • Emerald – Simple, Clean and Fresh Icon Theme For Linux
  • How to record a region of your desktop as animated GIF on Linux
  • sTLP - Don't go chasing power management

KDE and GNOME

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KDE
GNOME

SUSE and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian Fun in December 2016

    November marked the 20th month I contributed to Debian LTS under the Freexian umbrella.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (November and December 2016)
  • jan17vcspkg

    I spent a lot of time defending the workflow I described in dgit-maint-merge(7) (which was inspired by this blog post). However, I came to be convinced that there is a case for a manually curated series of patches for certain classes of package. It will depend on how upstream uses git (rebasing or merging) and on whether the Debian delta from upstream is significant and/or long-standing. I still think that we should be using dgit-maint-merge(7) for leaf or near-leaf packages, because it saves so much volunteer time that can be better spent on other things.

    When upstream does use a merging workflow, one advantage of the dgit-maint-merge(7) workflow is that Debian’s packaging is just another branch of development.

Tizen News

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Linux
  • Verimatrix brings forensic watermarking to 2017 Samsung Smart TVs, prevents piracy [Ed: When ‘smart’ TV means a TV that’s an informant against you, can have you arrested]

    Samsung is always doing its best to get ahead with trends, and in the area of smart TVs, UHD and 4K content is where it’s at. And yet, there’s always trouble lurking in mobile. With 4K content becoming the new gold standard, there are those who would rather perform more roundabout techniques to access content illegally than to pay for it. For these criminally mastermind individuals, smart TVs must be smarter than ever before. Samsung and Verimatrix have worked out a solution: forensic watermarking.

  • Learn more about the Samsung Gear S3 with this Developer Webinar

    The Samsung Gear S3 is a fantastic Tizen smartwatch, there isn’t much disagreement with that statement, that has some fantastic opportunities for Native / HTML5 / TIzen app and game devs. The Gear S3 looks and feels like a real watch, new UX components, which allows you to use it to build new user experiences.

  • Samsung updates Tizen Studio SDK to version 1.0.2

Android Leftovers

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Android

Development News

  • GCC 7 Getting Closer To Release, But Running Behind On Regressions

    Jakub Jelinek of Red Hat has provided the latest status report concerning the state of the GNU Compiler Collection 7 code compiler.

    GCC 7 has been in "stage three" for a while now meaning only bug/general fixes landing, but they are planning to enter stage four on 19 January. When stage four begins, only wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes will be accepted.

  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.0

    A new version, now at 0.2.0, of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN. And it brings a significant change: windows builds! Thanks to Dan Dillon who dug deep enough into the libc++ sources from LLVM to port the std::get_time() function that is missing from the 4.* series of g++. And with Rtools being fixed at g++-4.9.3 this was missing for us here. Now we can parse dates for use by RcppCCTZ on Windows as well. That is important not only for RcppCCTZ but also particularly for the one package (so far) depending on it: nanotime.

  • Mozilla's Servo Begins Firming Up 2017 Goals

    Among their proposed goals for Servo in 2017 are finishing Stylo (Servo's CSS style system into Gecko), extending WebRender as the GPU accelerated back-end, experimenting with initial layout integration in other products, exploring Flexbox, extending and better supporting embedding APIs, and implementing other high priority DOM APIs. Among the research proposed for this year is a magic DOM and JavaScript optimizations along with software transactional memory.

  • Mozilla Calls for "Responsible IoT"

    As the Internet of Things (IoT) gains momentum, there is a need for collaboration, open and interoperable tools, and governance. In fact, all the way back in 2015, Philip DesAutels, the AllSeen Alliance’s leader, told us that: “In five years, I think all of this will be around us everywhere, in everything. The next phase is going to be the really transformational phase. “Systems around you will have a whole lot more information. They’ll be able to deliver a lot more value.”

    Now, Mozilla, which has been keeping track of the convergence of open source and the Internet of Things, is out with a new report calling for "responsible IoT."

  • Communities Over Code: How to Build a Successful Project by Joe Brockmeier, Red Hat
  • Communities Over Code: How to Build a Successful Software Project

    Healthy productive FOSS projects don't just happen, but are built, and the secret ingredient is Community over code. Purpose and details are everything: If you build it will they come, and then how do you keep it going and growing? How do you set direction, attract and retain contributors, what do you do when there are conflicts, and especially conflicts with valuable contributors? Joe Brockmeier (Red Hat) shares a wealth of practical wisdom at LinuxCon North America.

  • Open technology for land rights documentation

    Technology is only one part of the solution, but at Cadasta we believe it is a key component. While many governments had modern technology systems put in place to manage land records, often these were expensive to maintain, required highly trained staff, were not transparent, and were otherwise too complicated. Many of these systems, created at great expense by donor governments, are already outdated and no longer accurately reflect existing land and property rights.

OSS in the Back End

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • What is DataOps?

    DataOps describes the creation & curation of a central data hub, repository and management zone designed to collect, collate and then onwardly distribute data such that data analytics can be more widely democratised across an entire organisation and, subsequently, more sophisticated layers of analytics can be brought to bear such as built-for-purpose analytics engines.

  • Essentials of OpenStack Administration Part 5: OpenStack Releases and Use Cases

    OpenStack has come a long way since 2010 when NASA approached Rackspace for a project. With 1,600 individual contributors to OpenStack and a six-month release cycle, there are a lot of changes and progress. This amount of change and progress is not without its drawbacks. In the Juno release, there were something like 10,000 bugs. In the next release, Kilo, there were 13,000 bugs. But as OpenStack is deployed in more environments, and more people are interested in it, the community grows both in users and developers.

  • How to find your first OpenStack job

    We’ve covered the growth of OpenStack jobs and how you can become involved in the community. Maybe that even inspired you to search for OpenStack jobs and explore the professional opportunities for Stackers. You probably have questions, so we’re here to answer the frequent questions about working on OpenStack professionally.

  • OpenStack becomes ‘de facto’ private cloud

    A mixed year for OpenStack with HPE and Cisco seeming to step away from the community.

  • OpenStack under the radar
  • Angel Diaz talks about OpenStack Interop

    At the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, 16 vendors stood on stage and demonstrated interoperability. This was a major breakthrough for OpenStack. It marked a significant departure from just 18 months earlier when the OpenStack Foundation had chided vendors for creating lots of proprietary solutions. Enterprise Times sat down with Angel Diaz, IBM Vice President, Cloud Architecture and Technology to talk about this achievement.

  • How to take a leadership role in OpenStack

    On top of her job as a system architect at Nokia, Afek has taken an active role in the OpenStack community as the project team lead (PTL) of Vitrage and a voice in gender equality in the technology field with the Women of OpenStack. You may have also seen her taking center stage at the recent OpenStack Summit Barcelona, where she took part in a daredevil demo.

  • Landing a job, becoming the de facto private cloud, and more OpenStack news

Top LibreOffice Alternatives

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • Top LibreOffice Alternatives

    More people than ever are enjoying the benefits of LibreOffice. It's free to use and open source. But what about LibreOffice alternatives? Are there any good LibreOffice Alternative sand should you try them for yourself? This article is going to share some of the best LibreOffice alternatives and provide links where you can learn more about each of them.

  • Ubuntu Tablet - quick test LibreOffice

    Ubuntu Tablet - quick test Libre Office in desktop mode tablet Bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition running Unity 8 bluetooth mouse + keyboard

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

According to the Fedora 26 release schedule, the upcoming operating system is approaching an important milestone, namely the proposal submission deadline for system-wide changes, which is currently set for January 31. Read more Also: Fedora 26 Planning To Enable TRIM/Discard On Encrypted Disks

New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

  • KDE Neon Has Stylish New Install Wizard
    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
  • KDE neon Inaugurated with Calamares Installer
    You voted for change and today we’re bringing change. Today we give back the installer to the people. Today Calamares 3 was released. It’s been a long standing wish of KDE neon to switch to the Calamares installer. Calamares is a distro independent installer used by various projects such as Netrunner and Tanglu. It’s written in Qt and KDE Frameworks and has modules in C++ or Python.