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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Prometheus unbound: Open source cloud monitoring Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 4:19pm
Story A Linux Kernel Wizard’s Adventures in Embedded Hardware Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 4:05pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:53am
Story Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:51am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:50am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:50am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 9:07am
Story 3 open source data visualization tools for Hadoop Rianne Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 8:47am
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 8:22am
Story Linux Lite 3.0 Roy Schestowitz 18/07/2016 - 8:14am

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • Polyglot – Learn, Share, Collaborate – Hackfest 2016!!

    So for this HACKFEST 2016, wondered how would it be if we could share the learning through a wiki and collaboratively maintain an up-to-date content. I had a hunch that this might be a problem that many would have faced and would be good to solve.

  • How not to get help in open source

    In her lightning talk at Great Wide Open 2016, Emily Dunham shares the most common ways people shoot themselves in the foot while looking for help with an open source project:

    Ask for experts
    Leave IRC after asking your question
    Withholding information
    Asking permission to ask a question
    Going where the experts aren't
    Being offensive

  • Having a Gas at Texas Linux Fest 2016

    Texas Linux Fest 2016 is in the books, safely tucked away in the annals of free open source history, The wonderful folks who make TLF happen were again gracious enough to give Reglue a booth in the expo hall, and for those who are watching from home, space in any TLF expo hall ain’t cheap. Just like last year, Reglue Vice President Carolyn Huxley was gracious enough to work our booth and answer questions like, “What’s a Reglue?” My personal thanks for her help.

Web browsers for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Web
  • Best Graphical Web Browsers for Linux

    Web Browsers is one of the top most contributor of Computer desktops. As we know, we can’t do any work in system without browser help like, for browsing something, checking mails, net banking access, chatting, etc.., here I’m going to show you modern web browsers which is in active, under development and widely using in Linux Desktops.

  • Latest Vivaldi Browser Snapshot Improves Tab Hibernation on GNU/Linux Distros

    Today, July 11, 2016, Vivaldi released a new snapshot version for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows, bringing multiple fixes and improvements.

Git 2.9 Version Control System Gets Its First Point Release with 28 Improvements

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Development

Coming approximately one month since the launch of the massive Git 2.9 update, the first point release in the series, Git 2.9.1, is now available for download on all supported platforms.

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Exclusive: These could be Google's upcoming Android Wear smartwatches

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Android

As we reported last week, Google is in the process of building two Android Wear smartwatches. At the time, we were unable to show you the watches themselves. Today, that changes - what you see in the image above could be codename "Angelfish" and "Swordfish," Google's two Assistant-enabled wearables that we believe will be released after the new Nexus phones.

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Also: Google's Android Wear 'Angelfish', 'Swordfish' Smartwatches Leaked in Images

Samsung Z2 Documentation Image Leak, The Next Tizen Smartphone

Filed under
Linux

Samsung Z2 Documentation Leak

We have been talking about the upcoming Samsung Z2 smartphone for a while now and today we have seen some leaked documentation surface that looks like it is part of the official user manual of Samsung’s next Tizen based Smartphone. As we exclusively reported earlier this year the device will carry the model number SM-Z200F.

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LeapDroid claims to be the fastest Android emulator for your PC

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Android

When it comes to running Android on your PC, short of installing the Android x86 project, you can get by with an emulator. With that, this program called Bluestacks is probably the most popular. Enter LeapDroid, a new emulator which claims to be the “world’s fastest” Android emulator on PC. I guess we have to try it to believe it.

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Open-source Linux a step closer to automotive use

Filed under
Linux

Although it may seem like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are all the rage for dashboard infotainment systems, open-source Linux proponents haven't conceded the battle yet. The Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) project announced the release of its Unified Code Base 2.0, implementing new in-vehicle entertainment support desired by automakers and drivers.

The new code base adds support for audio routing, rear-seat entertainment systems and apps. It follows the version 1.0 release at CES earlier this year.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
  • SiFive brings open-source SoCs
  • Startup SiFive Aims for Open-Source Chips
  • First SoCs based on open source RISC-V run Linux

    SiFive unveiled the first embedded SoCs based on the open source RISC-V platform: A Linux-ready octa-core Freedom U500 and a FreeRTOS-based Freedom E300.

    A VC-backed startup closely associated with the RISC-V project announced the first system-on-chip implementations of the open source RISC-V processor platform. At the RISC-V 4thWorkshop at MIT this week, SiFive announced two embedded SoC families. The Freedom Unleashed family debuts with a 28nm fabricated, Freedom U500 SoC with up to eight 1.6GHz cores that runs Linux, aimed at machine learning, storage, and networking applications. The MCU-like Freedom Everywhere family for Internet of Things starts with a 180nm Freedom E300 model that runs FreeRTOS.

  • Server class COM supports 16-core Xeons, packs dual 10GbE

    Advantech’s server-class SOM-5991 COM Express module runs Linux on up to 16-core Xeon D-1500 processors, and offers dual 10GBase-KR ports and PCIe with NTB.

    We’ve seen a number of embedded boards supporting server-class Xeon E3-1200 SoCs from Intel’s Skylake architecture, such as Seco’s COMe-B09-BT6 COM Express Basic Type 6 module. Yet, Advantech’s SOM-5991, which uses the same 125 x 95mm Basic Type 6 form factor, is the first we’ve seen to run the similarly 14nm “Broadwell” based Xeon D-1500 SoCs, which are available with up to 16-core Xeons. Advantech claims it’s the first COM Express to use the Xeon D-1500, which debuted over a year ago, with more models arriving last fall and earlier this year.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Tech Talk: Why Government Software Should Be Open-Source

Filed under
OSS

Bulgaria just did something revolutionary, and just a tiny bit crazy; they’ve signed in a few new laws concerning software used by their government that, among other things, stipulate that all government software must be open-source, and must be developed and maintained in public repositories. The new laws are not independent, but instead stand as amendments to their Electronic Governance Act. The law also talks about free and public APIs, easy multi-ecosystem implementation, and a number of other things all targeted at making government software as open, transparent and friendly as possible. While a great number of countries use some open-source software, Bulgaria is the first country to go fully open-source, shutting out closed-source software entirely. While the other sections of Article 58 are important, it’s the open-source bit that really shakes things up and presents a possibility of real positive change in the way government software is created, maintained, used and interacted with, not only in the rule’s homeland of Bulgaria, but throughout the world.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 to Land Next Wednesday, OTA-13 Brings Libertine Improvements

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Touch saga continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about some of the latest changes coming in the next major update, the OTA-13, as well as about some good news for the soon-to-be-released OTA-12.

According to Canonical's Łukasz Zemczak, the testing of the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-12 software update is almost over and things are looks great. No blockers, and everything works as expected for almost all devices, with a small exception for Meizu PRO 5 and BQ Aquaris M10, which need custom tarball re-spins.

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Budgie Desktop 10.2.6 Comes with Redesigned Budgie Menu, Spotify Compatibility

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Today, July 12, 2016, Softpedia was informed by Solus project leader Ikey Doherty about the general availability of the Budgie 10.2.6 desktop environment, a major release that introduces lots of new features and improvements.

Coming three and a half months after the release of Budgie 10.2.5, which most of the Solus users are using on their computers, the Budgie 10.2.6 update promises many goodies. But first, the biggest change is the implementation of a stable, performant API/ABI, which will force those who maintain Budgie extensions to rebuild them based on the new API/ABI.

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Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Provides A Surprise For Pascal GPU Owners Wanting Open-Source

    After it took NVIDIA until earlier this year to release the signed firmware for the GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell" GPUs, I expected -- and based upon what I heard -- that it could be months before seeing the firmware for GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" GPUs in order to enable hardware acceleration with these latest-generation GPUs. Thus it's a huge surprise today to see NVIDIA already making public their Pascal GP100 firmware images!

    Hitting this afternoon in linux-firmware Git are the GP100 firmware files! There are 15 binary-only firmware blobs now part of the linux-firmware tree needed for initializing GP100 hardware. The GP100 blobs are named (for providing some reference) bl, ucode_load, ucode_unload, fecs_bl, fecs_data, fecs_inst, fecs_sig, gpccs_bl, gpccs_data, gpccs_inst, gpccs_sig, sw_bundle_init, sw_ctx, sw_method_init, and sw_nonctx. The largest of these blobs are 20955 bytes.

  • Just About 20 Lines Of Code Got Open-Source 3D Running On NVIDIA Pascal For Mesa

    Just a few hours ago I was writing about NVIDIA making public the GP100 "Pascal" GPU firmware binaries needed for as a requirement for bringing up GeForce GTX 1000 series hardware acceleration on the open-source driver stack. Now the initial support has landed in Nouveau's NVC0 Gallium3D driver within Mesa for allowing 3D support.

    Ben Skeggs of Red Hat landed an initial support patch that has 16 lines of new code and five lines of deletions that bring this initial GP100 series GPU support. The support mostly comes down to just adding the "0x130" case and various other relatively simple changes to allow this code to work. The bring-up for Pascal in the Nouveau stack is much more complicated within the Nouveau DRM kernel driver than what was needed for the Gallium3D user-space code. The GP100 Pascal Nouveau kernel changes so far were outlined in Initial Open-Source GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" Nouveau Driver Support -- that work is starting to land in Linux 4.8.

  • Blender Cycles Render Engine Benchmarks With NVIDIA CUDA On Linux

    Here is a look at the performance of the Blender 3D modeling/creation software with its Cycles Engine when making use of NVIDIA's CUDA API for GPU acceleration. Tests for this initial comparison include NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" and GTX 900 "Maxwell" graphics cards.

Linux Mint 18

Filed under
Reviews

During my trial, Mint 18 provided me with a stable, friendly and problem-free experience. The distribution has a installer which is simple to use, a good collection of documentation and an excellent selection of default software. The configuration tools are straight forward to use, the software manager is easy to use and everything generally just worked the way I wanted it to. The one problem I ran into during my whole trial was the video display issue when running from the live disc, and that was quickly solved by switching to the fail-safe graphics mode from the live disc's boot menu.

I was curious to try X-Apps and I generally found these to be an improvement. I dislike the mobile-style interfaces GNOME applications tend to use and how they break consistency with other applications. X-Apps provide the same functionality as their GNOME counterparts, but improve the interface to work the same as all the other desktop applications. Most of the changes are small, but make working with the text editor or video player a much less frustrating experience.

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Also: Linux Mint 18 " Sarah "

Linux Kernel 4.4.15 LTS Adds Many Updated USB Drivers, It's Already in Solus

Filed under
Linux

After announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.6.4, which is now the most advanced stable kernel branch available, Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the community about the release of Linux kernel 4.4.15 LTS.

The Linux 4.4 kernel series is an LTS (Long Term Support) one, which means that it will be supported with security patches and bug fixes for a few more years than the normal Linux kernel branches. Because of this, many popular GNU/Linux operating systems prefer to use it, no matter if they are following a static or rolling release model. Among these, we can mention Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Arch Linux, and Solus.

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32-Bit Ubuntu Alternatives

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Some folks may find the idea of using a 32-bit distribution of Linux to be downright silly. After all, we live in a 64-bit world these days, right? Well, that depends on who you ask. The fact of the matter is there are still a lot of fully functional PCs out there that run 32-bit Linux. Up until recently, this was all well and good. Then the news came down that Ubuntu would no longer be supporting 32-bit systems come the next Ubuntu release. Clearly not everyone is thrilled about his news.

Rather than throw in the towel and recycle these PCs, I think it's important to realize there is a world beyond Ubuntu. Yes, many other distros have also stopped support 32-bit distros. However for the time being, there are still options to choose from. In this article, I'm going to share some great non-Ubuntu based 32-bit friendly Linux distros you should check out.

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Mycroft AI Intelligent Personal Assistant Gets Major Update for GNOME Desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

Approximately a month ago, we showed you the GNOME Shell extension of the unique Mycroft AI personal intelligent assistant for GNU/Linux operating systems running on the Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) distribution.

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The Superbook is a $99 laptop shell for your Android phone

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Android

The dream of turning your smartphone into a laptop will never die. From Motorola's Atrix to this crazy HP Windows Phone, there have been a number of companies that have tried (and largely failed) to build a smartphone that can be attached to a dock and turned into a laptop.

In a somewhat new twist, a company wants to sell you just the laptop shell, while letting you use your current Android phone and an app to power it. The Superbook is a 11.6-inch laptop shell built by the team behind Andromium OS, the app that allows your Android smartphone to run a desktop-like operating system.

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Today in Techrights

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News
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Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more