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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Shroud of the Avatar, Super Blood Hockey, Dead Acres, Vulture, The End Is Nigh

Filed under
Gaming

Review: Parabola GNU/Linux-libre

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Parabola GNU/Linux-libre is one of a few Linux distributions that meet the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) guidelines for free operating systems. The distribution is based on Arch Linux and ships with the Linux-libre kernel, which doesn't include software for which no source code is available (or which is otherwise proprietary). On top of that Parabola removes any non-free packages from the system.

The distribution is available for the armv7, i686 and x86_64 architectures. The main ISO boots to a command line from where we can manually install the operating system, while a live ISO gives us the MATE desktop and access to a basic graphical installer. Interestingly, it is also possible to migrate from Arch Linux to Parabola.

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CruxEX 2017 Linux Distro Debuts with Revamped LXDE Desktop, Based on CRUX 3.3

Filed under
Linux

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is informing us about the release and immediate availability of his CRUX-based CruxEX 3.3 distro, a release that bumps the Linux kernel to the 4.12 series and revamps the LXDE desktop environment.

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Tiny Core Linux 8.1 Brings Latest BusyBox with LZMA Capabilities, Improvements

Filed under
Linux

The minimalist Tiny Core Linux independently developed GNU/Linux distribution has been updated recently to version 8.1, a release that brings the latest BusyBox with extra functionality.

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FreeBSD 10.4-BETA4 Now Available

Filed under
BSD

The fourth BETA build of the 10.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

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What’s New in Linux Lite 3.6 and Linux Mint 18.3 Release Date

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • What’s New in Linux Lite 3.6

    Linux Lite 3.6 has been released and announced by Linux Lite developer Jerry Bezencon. This release based on Canonical’s latest Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS (Xenial Xerus), features Xfce desktop 4.12 as default desktop, powered by long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, though users can install a wide range of kernels from the distro’s stable repositories.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 Release Date

    Wondering when the Linux Mint 18.3 release date is? I was, so I figured I’d write a short post about it.

    Turns out that, officially, there isn’t a specific release date or release schedule for Linux Mint 18.3.

    Unlike Ubuntu, which issues a new release every 6 months, Linux Mint does not release to a fixed schedule.

KDE: Fedora's KDE Spin and Upcoming Randa Meetings 2017

Filed under
KDE
  • Is Fedora's KDE Spin Too Bloated?

    This weekend on the Fedora mailing list a debate has begun over whether Fedora's KDE desktop spin is too bloated and what could be done about it.

    As most longtime Linux users know, Fedora is mostly centered around the GNOME Shell desktop with its Fedora Workstation, but it does have a vibrant community of maintainers keeping the Fedora KDE spin among other desktop spins active.

    Initiated this weekend on the Fedora development list is a debate about A less "bloated" KDE spin.

  • Randa Meetings 2017: Everything is ready

    Yesterday we went shopping to nourish some Free Software enthusiasts next week.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

BSD: FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and LLVM Clang

Filed under
BSD

Oracle Linux 7 Update 4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Oracle Linux 7 Update 4 General Availability

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 Update 4 for x86-64 servers.

    The Oracle Linux operating system is an open foundation for the cloud. It is developed and extensively tested with demanding enterprise workloads like Oracle Database as well as many third-party applications in public and private clouds.

  • Oracle Linux 7 Update 4 Brings UEFI SecureBoot, USBGuard Added & Btrfs Supported

    While Oracle is slashing Solaris and SPARC jobs, their RHEL-derived Oracle Linux operating system continues getting pushed forward. Oracle Linux 7 Update 4 is now available as their re-based version off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4.

    Besides incorporating the changes made by Red Hat in RHEL 7.4, Oracle Linux 7 Update 4 has finally added UEFI Secure Boot support with keys signed by Microsoft. Other additions in the name of security include OpenSSH now using SHA-2, a GPG check payload for Yum, NBDE security packages have been added, and USBGuard has also been added to protect against intrusive USB devices.

Laptops That Ship Pre-installed With Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

​In the past, to get Linux on your laptop, you needed to get a laptop that shipped with Windows and then install your Linux distro on top of them. This usually means two main issues. The first being that you paid about $100 extra for Windows and then also, support in terms of drivers for the laptop were up in the air as your hardware may be supported fully, partially or not at all. But these days things are changing. There are many laptops that ship with Linux preinstalled. Meaning you get better hardware support and then save some bucks off for not paying for Windows. THANK YOU! So what are your options if you wanted a laptop with Linux preinstalled? Read along.

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Graphics: Mesa 17.1.9, Out-of-Order Rasterization On RadeonSI, and Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Everyone loves programming in Python! You disagree? But it's the fastest growing, says Stack Overflow

Filed under
Development

Python, which ranks consistently as one of the most popular programming languages, is the fastest growing major programming language, according to coding community site Stack Overflow.

Stack Overflow's metric here is visits to website posts tagged "Python" compared to posts tagged with other programming languages – specifically JavaScript, Java, C#, C++ and PHP.

"June 2017 was the first month that Python was the most visited tag on Stack Overflow within high-income nations," said David Robinson, a data scientist at Stack Overflow, in a blog post. "This is especially impressive because in 2012, it was less visited than any of the other 5 languages, and has grown by 2.5-fold in that time."

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Xfce tweaks - Make your desktop prettier

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Are these tweaks necessary? Nope. And in an ideal world, one should never have to tweak their desktop any which way. But if you are using the Xfce environment, and you'd like to make it ever so slightly friendlier and better suited for everyday days, these tips, in addition to my previous pimping guides, ought to help you get the best from it.

Today, we focused mostly on the panel and system area, some desktop icon tweaks, but mostly, on how to work with configuration files and make special changes that are not necessarily reflected through any GUI tool. In the end, modern desktops are like web pages, so you become a creator slash artist. Well, that would be all for today.

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Btrfs, KVM and Xen in Linux 4.14 (LTS)

Filed under
Linux
  • KVM & Xen Updates For The Linux 4.14 Kernel

    The KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) and Xen updates have been submitted for the Linux 4.14 kernel merge window.

  • Btrfs Gets Fixes & Prep Work In Linux 4.14

    Besides the separate pull request that brought Zstd compression support for Btrfs with the in-development Linux 4.14 kernel, the main Btrfs pull request was also submitted on Friday for updating this Linux file-system.

    Besides the Zstd compression support, there isn't a whole lot more of end-user exciting work for Btrfs in Linux 4.14. But there is lots of prep work for future features as well as fixes.

System76 Moves Ahead With Writing Their Own OS Installer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Earlier this summer we heard how System76 might make their own distribution installer. They indeed are moving forward in this effort to construct their own installer from scratch and it's written in Rust.

System76 has been wanting a basic installer for their Pop!_OS Ubuntu derivative. They want a simple installer and where much of the work can be punted off to the GNOME Initial Setup stage. Following their research of Ubiquity and friends, they have decided to move ahead and write their own installer.

Their new installer consists of "Distinst" as the distribution installer back-end and and then there's the Elementary OS project hosting the installer's GUI frontend. Elementary has been helping the System76 crew construct their distribution.

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The Apache Software Foundation Blog: Apache Struts Statement on Equifax Security Breach (and More)

Filed under
Security

Security: Microsoft Won't Patch, Kaspersky Responds, EU Cyberwar Games

Filed under
Security
  • Microsoft won't patch Edge XSS vulnerability

     

    The flaw has been patched in recent versions of Google Chrome and WebKit-based browsers (such as Apple Safari for macOS and iOS), but not in Microsoft's Edge for Windows 10.

  • Microsoft shrugs off Windows kernel bug that can block malware detection

     

    "After digging into the matter, what started as a seemingly random issue proved to originate from a coding error in the Windows kernel itself. This flaw exists in the most recent Windows 10 release and past versions of the OS, dating back to Windows 2000."

    [...]

     

    "We [also] contacted MSRC [Microsoft Security Response Center] about this issue at the beginning of this year. They did not deem it as a security issue.

  • Kaspersky: Ex-NSA infosec expert asks FBI to put up or shut up

     

    Former NSA employee and information security expert Jake Williams has told the FBI to either provide proof to the public that Kaspersky Lab products are unsafe for use or keep mum.

  • EU hosts its first cyber war games

     

    "The goal of the exercise is to highlight a number of strategic concerns and topics that arise in connection with any hypothetical cyber crisis. This exercise should serve as a forum for discussion at ministerial level and provide strategic guidance to address future crises," it said.

  • Cyber alert: EU ministers test responses in first computer war game [iophk: "blanket ban Microsoft in the EU"]

     

    After a series of global cyber attacks disrupted multinational firms, ports and public services on an unprecedented scale this year, governments are seeking to stop hackers {sic} from shutting down more critical infrastructure or crippling corporate and government networks.  

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.