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Thursday, 18 Dec 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenELEC 5.0 RC2 Is Out, It's an Awesome OS for Embedded Devices Already Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 10:10pm
Story Lamborghini Tauri 88: The $6,000 Android phone Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:29pm
Story F2FS On Linux 3.19 To Support Faster Boot Times Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:27pm
Story Firefox 35 Beta Arrives with Conference Call Features for Hello Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:23pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 Gets Linux Kernel 3.18 Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:11pm
Story Mozilla Developer Experimenting With Firefox UI In HTML Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 7:49pm
Story Open source for sensitive email Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Linux Distros: What’s in a Name? Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 7:43pm
Story 6-Way Winter 2014 Linux Distribution Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 7:39pm
Story Mozilla and Telenor Announce WebRTC Competency Center to Advance WebRTC and Help Standardization Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 7:38pm

10 Open Source Security Tools from Google, Facebook, Netflix and Cisco

Filed under
OSS
Security

Choice has long been a defining feature of the world of free and open source software, and the constellation of options only gets bigger every year. Often it's brand-new projects causing the increase, but sometimes the growth happens in another way, when tools that were developed for a company's internal use get opened up for all the world to see, use and improve.

That, in fact, is just what has been happening lately on a grand scale in the security arena, where numerous major companies have been opting to open the doors to their own, in-house tools. Google, Facebook and Netflix are all among the companies taking this approach lately, and it's changing the security landscape significantly.

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Google Chromebooks Outsell iPads in U.S. Schools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Chromebooks from vendors such as Acer, HP, Samsung and Dell edged out iPads in sales to U.S. schools during the third quarter, according to new data from IDC.
Google's low-cost Chromebook laptops have for the first time overtaken Apple's iPads in sales to U.S. schools.

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More Android Apps Arriving for Chrome OS and Chromebooks

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Just a few years ago, before Android marched to its dominant position in the mobile market, there was much speculation that Google might merge Chrome OS and Android. Early last year, I wrote a post on why that won't happen.

However, an interesting corollary trend is now appearing. Following an initial round of Android apps that can run on Chrome OS, more and more are arriving. The news was announced on a Chrome G+ page, bringing the total number of apps available across Chrome and Android to more than 40.

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SD Times blog: Surveys show open source makes for faster secure development

Filed under
OSS

One of the things we see a lot of here at SD Times is surveys. It’s a great idea for your company to survey its customers, and the resulting information can be really useful—not just to your company, but to those of us who track the industry and its trends.

Thus, I was fairly disturbed by the results of a recent survey by Mendix that found that enterprise developers are having a very hard time giving the business folks what they’ve asked for. Gottfried Sehringer, vice president of marketing at Mendix, painted a fairly bleak picture of the state of enterprise development.

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Why there’s no open-source standard-bearer for the network

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software plays an increasingly prominent role in many areas of modern business IT – it’s in servers, databases and even the cloud. Vendors like Red Hat, Canonical and others have managed to graft open-source principles onto a profitable business model. The former company became the first open-source-centered business with $1 billion in annual revenue in 2012.

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Nginx 1.7.8 Updates Open-Source Web Server

Filed under
OSS

Today a new incremental version of nginx was released with the 1.7.8 milestone update.

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Friendship & the Linux Community

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a global community…a quarrelsome community, I will give you that, but a community nonetheless. We are richer by many degrees for our links to each other within this community. We are friends within the Linux community. A community where real friendships do in fact begin.

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The impact of the Linux philosophy

Filed under
GNU
Linux

All operating systems have a philosophy. And, the philosophy of an operating system matters. What is the Linux philosophy and how does it affect the community? How has it changed software development for the ages?

Whether we know it or not, most of us have some sort of philosophy of life. It may be as simple as, "Be kind to others," or it might be a very complex life philosophy.

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Stephen Hawking unveils 'life changing' new voice technology in London

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

Intel said they planned to make the system open-source and free for users.

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Now crowdfunding: A laptop that protects your digital rights

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Do you have any idea what your laptop is doing deep down? Is there any way to find out? Usually, the answer is no. Anything could be in there, and as Edward Snowden’s revelations have disclosed, plenty of people in official positions want to make sure that "could be" becomes "is."

Until now, if you wanted a laptop where you or someone you trust could inspect all the source code needed to use it, you had to build it yourself. But a new crowdfunding campaign wants to make a laptop that's designed to use open source software and comes with open source-licensed code to everything, even the firmware.

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Living free with Trisquel GNU/Linux 7.0

Filed under
Reviews

Trisquel's system installer is essentially the same installer Ubuntu uses, but with a few minor changes to the appearance and some of the options. The installer asks us to select our preferred language and provides us with a link to view the distribution's release notes. Next we are given the chance to download software updates while the installer is running. The following screen asks if we would like Trisquel to automatically divide up our hard disk for us or if we would like to manually partition our hard drive. Manual partitioning is quite straight forward and I found it easy to navigate the disk partitioning screen. Trisquel gives us the option of working with Btrfs, ext2/3/4, JFS and XFS file systems. I opted to install Trisquel on a Btrfs partition. While partitioning the disk we can also choose where to install the distribution's boot loader. The following screen gets us to select our time zone from a map of the world. Then we confirm our keyboard's layout and create a user account for ourselves. We can decide to encrypt the contents of our home directory. The installer copies its files to our hard drive and then asks us to reboot the computer.

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Systemd to Free BSDs, Mint 17.1, and Coolest Things

Filed under
-s

Today was another busy day in Linuxland. Linux Mint 17.1 was released over the weekend and a couple of reviews have emerged already. Katherine Noyes says some Linuxers are thinking of heading towards the free *BSDs and Shawn Powers has a list of some of the coolest things folks do with Linux. Jasper St. Pierre explains what's wrong with package managers and Dedoimedo.com is running a best distro of 2014 poll. Ian Sullivan explains how to "De-Chrome" laptops and Bryan Lunduke has a holiday shopping guide.

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The Linux holiday shopping guide

Filed under
Linux

Traditionally, finding gifts for the Open Source-loving, Linux-running person in your life has not been terribly easy to accomplish. Not so this year. It seems the world is filled with Linux-powered gadgets and gizmos galore. What follows are my personal recommendations (ranging in price from $35 to well over $1,000) that, I feel, most Linux enthusiasts would be stoked to receive – and every single one is powered by one Linux-based system or another.

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CompuLab launches Utilite2: Tiny ARM-based Ubuntu/Android PC

Filed under
Android
Ubuntu

CompuLab is updating its Utilite line of tiny, low-power desktop computers. The new Utilite2 is 30 percent smaller than last year’s Utilite. But the company says the new model offers up to twice the performance, thanks to a more powerful processor.

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Interview with Esfir Kanievska

Filed under
KDE
Humor

Open source, OMG ❤❤❤ Seriously, I like open source software much because there’s no need to bother my credit card every time the new software (as well as new OS) version is released. Moreover, the open source software developers are actually more interested in how to make it work rather than how to make it sell, so the result is often more human-oriented.

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The Android 5.0 Lollipop Review

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Google has been very busy with their expansion of Android as a platform this year. At Google IO we saw the announcement of endeavors like Android TV and Android Auto. But the stars of the show were a preview of the next version of Android, code named Android L, and Google's new Material Design principles for interface design across all of their products. In the years since Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich released, we've seen the launch of Jellybean and KitKat, but both of these versions were very iterative improvements upon 4.0 and had equally iterative version numbers with Jellybean being major versions 4.1 through 4.3 and KitKat being 4.4. Lollipop is given the major version number of 5.0, and it's quite fitting as it's arguably the biggest advancement to Android in a long time. It comes with an entirely new interface based on Material Design, a new application runtime, and many new features that I could not hope to summarize in this paragraph.

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Manjaro 0.8.11 released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux kernel used on the 0.8.11 installation media is the 3.16 series.

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Unity 8 Has Received Improvements For Desktop Usage

Filed under
Ubuntu

Now, Unity 8 looks pretty much like an oversized tablet, but Canonical has assured the Ubuntu fans that Unity 8 for desktop will not be a desktop optimized clone of Ubuntu Touch’s Unity 8, but a more modern Unity 7-like interface.

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Q4OS: Debian Stable with the Trinity Desktop Environment

Filed under
KDE
Debian

Q4OS is like Exe GNU/Linux a distribution using the Trinity desktop and based on Debian Stable. In fact I could have picked Exe as well for review but Q4OS just had a new release and it looks cleaner from the start. It was simply the novelty factor that pulled me towards it and it's got a few nice touches of its own as we shall see. Version 0.5.20 was just released on 11/11/2014 and is available both for the mainstream 32 (i386) and 64-bit architectures. The images are a modest 314MB and 337MB respectively which makes for a speedy download and will definitely fit on your CD or even older USB sticks.

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Jack And Jill Are Google's New Compilers For Android App Developers

Filed under
Android

Android has gone through quite a few changes during its short 6 years of life. The Android that drives most of the world's smartphones of today would be almost unrecognizable to what was launched in late 2008. We've seen massive visual changes, expansion to almost every conceivable form factor, and a completely fleshed-out content ecosystem for multimedia and apps. As the operating system matured, some elements have successfully grown with it, and others have become dead weight. Naturally, progress calls for the replacement of those pieces that haven't scaled well. We've seen an excellent example of this when ART came to replace Dalvik as the standard Android runtime. With the release of Lollipop, a similar project emerged that promises to replace a part of the existing app development toolchain with a pair of new compilers called Jack and Jill.

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