CM11 M8 finally released with Android 4.4.4 and ‘Heads Up’

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Android
OSS

So last month we saw the release of CM 11 M7 as a Snapshot. Again, those of you who are new to CM a ‘Snapshot’ is a nearly-stable release. This type of release is considered safe-to-use by CM and believed to contain all features and all bugs worked through. It is worth remembering being a Snapshot this does mean it is possible some unknown bugs may still exist although these will be minor. Now already we are seeing the next major release available today. CM 11 M8 was released this morning and offers Android 4.4.4. As the release has only just been made public the devices supported are rather limited although the variance will grow quite quickly knowing CM.

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5 reasons to switch to Deepin 2014

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Deepin 2014 is the latest version of Deepin, a Linux desktop that’s based on Ubuntu Desktop. Deepin 2014 is actually based on Ubuntu 14.04. It was released yesterday.

Deepin has always been on my list of the best desktop distributions, and Deepin 2014 just vaulted it to the top-2 of that list. The aim of this post is to show you why that happened and why I highly recommend that you should take Deepin 2014 out for a spin. I guarantee that you will like practically all it brings to the table.

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3.16 Fedora ARM kernel status

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Red Hat

So 3.16 is has quite a few new features in terms of newly supported devices, also some what surprisingly this blog post will be out before 3.16! In terms of new device support all the SoCs listed here are exciting for a number of reasons for Fedora ARM. Aarch64 (ARM64) makes it’s first debut with support of real hardware although we’ve actually had kernel support enable for it for some time in Fedora even if only usable on the glacial Foundation emulator.

The 3.16 release is also very likely to be the kernel that ships with Fedora 21 GA and with the Alpha due in about a month we’re starting to polish and test all the platforms and devices we want to support for GA.

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Issue with disc on Linux User & Developer 141

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Linux

Summary: Linux Mint 17 – the live-booting distro on the disc for 141 – does not install properly. Please download a newer version of the ISO from the Linux Mint website.

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NVIDIA 340.24 Linux Driver Has G-SYNC Support, FXAA Control

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Succeeding last month's NVIDIA 340.17 Linux driver beta is now the first official release in the 340.xx driver series for Linux / Solaris / BSD. The NVIDIA 340.24 driver was released this morning with new features but is heavier on the fixing side.

The main feature to the NVIDIA 340.24 driver (and carried over from the 340.17 driver) is initial support on Linux for G-SYNC monitors. The proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver now has support for dealing with G-SYNC (NVIDIA's variable refresh-rate technology similar in nature to AMD FreeSync and VESA Adaptive-Sync -- the support came just months after we reported NVIDIA was working on G-SYNC Linux support.

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Odroid hacker board jumps to faster octacore SoC

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Linux
Hardware

The Odroid-XU3 runs on a 5V 4A power supply, and once again features four energy monitoring chips for tracking the Big.Little cores. A plastic enclosure and an active cooler are available, along with numerous optional modules. OS support has been boosted to Android 4.4.2 and Ubuntu 14.04, available with full source code.
Schematics will be posted upon shipment, and community support is available via the Odroid project. The quad-core Exynos4412 based Odroid-U3 board came in at third place after the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black in our recent Top 10 Hacker SBC survey.

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Red Hat Announces General Availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5

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Red Hat

Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform delivers an enterprise-class cloud platform built on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, co-engineered and integrated with Red Hat's OpenStack technologies, offering IT organizations the agility to scale and quickly meet customer demands without compromising on availability, security, or performance.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5 is based on the OpenStack Icehouse release and includes several new features aimed at easing enterprise adoption of OpenStack technology in the existing datacenter and enhancing capabilities to make it a more reliable and dependable cloud platform, including.

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Linux 3.16 File-System Tests On A Hard Drive

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In complementing the earlier Linux 3.16 file-system tests on an SSD (and the later Btrfs testing), here are benchmarks of EXT4, XFS, and Btrfs from the Linux 3.15 and 3.16 kernels being compared from a traditional rotating hard drive.

As has become common practice at Phoronix, for each new development kernel we end up benchmarking the most commonly used, mainline Linux file-systems on a hard drive and solid state drive. With the SSD results out there in the aforelinked articles, in this article are results using a high-performance Western Digital HDD from a Core i7 Haswell system running Ubuntu and comparing the mainline stable Linux 3.15 kernel against a daily snapshot of Linux 3.16 from this week.

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Open Interconnect Consortium takes on Qualcomm’s Allseen

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OSS

In December when Qualcomm, the Linux Foundation, and several major consumer electronics companies announced the open source Allseen Alliance for standardizing Internet of Things connectivity, we wondered at the absence of major semiconductor companies. Well, here they are, starting up their own rival IoT group called the Open Interconnect Consortium. Intel, Samsung, Broadcom, and Atmel have launched OIC along with computer manufacturer Dell and Intel’s embedded software provider Wind River.

The OIC members will “create both a standard specification and an open source project to address the challenges of connecting billions of IoT devices,” according to the OIC FAQ. The organization says it will create a “standard for interoperability across multiple vertical markets and use cases,” starting with smart home and office markets, followed by automotive, and later moving to industrial and health applications.

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Open-Source Software: Bad For Non-Profit Organizations?

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OSS

For non-profit organizations, open-source/free software might not actually be the best solution according to a director at a non-profit software solution provider.

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Tech Giants Use Open Source to Get You to Cough Up for Other Products

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OSS

Most open source software projects come to life because someone is trying to scratch an itch.

Some group of coders or a team of academics or a fast-moving startup will build some software that solves a very real computing problem, and then they’ll open source the code, sharing it with the world at large. Maybe, the coders are trying to help the larger world of software developers, believing that others will find the code useful too. Maybe, they’re trying to get more eyes on their code, hoping that others will contribute bug reports and fixes to the project. Or maybe, as is typically the case, they’re trying to do both.

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Red Hat Announces Availability of its OpenStack Platform 5

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Red Hat

Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5, which is the third enterprise release of the company's OpenStack offering. Aside from new features, the platform is clearly being aimed at many types of organizations, including "advanced cloud users, telecommunications companies, Internet service providers (ISPs), and public cloud hosting providers."

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Codio: A Multi-language IDE with Its Own Ubuntu Instance

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Development
Ubuntu

Codio is a browser-based IDE supporting a large number of languages and including its own Ubuntu instance to test the code.

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Free software to assist indigenous access to computers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

But he adds that it is important to make sure there are no compatibility problems between GNU/Linux and hardware, which is often a problem due to its complexity, and to ensure automatic updates are available.

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SparkyLinux 3.4 GameOver -- a Linux distro for gamers

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Historically, Linux and gaming were like oil and water -- it did not mix. For the most part, this was just accepted as a fact of life. Quite frankly, this was OK as users were more interested in maintaining their box and chatting with other Linux users anyway. However, as time went by, jealousy of DOS, and then ultimately Windows, definitely grew as more and more amazing games were released for Microsoft's operating system. Even Linus Torvalds himself dual-booted Linux and DOS to play Prince of Persia.

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X.Org Server 1.16 Delayed To Let In Non-PCI Graphics Support

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Server

X.Org Server 1.16 has been delayed. However, it's not been delayed like in some of the more notorious past releases due to outstanding bugs, etc, but over letting in a late feature to this latest revision of the X11 server.

There was a lot of developer interest and pressure to let non-PCI device support get merged for the 1.16 stable release. This non-PCI support is needed for allowing the NVIDIA Tegra (open-source) graphics driver to work properly in an easy manner since it's not exposed as a PCI VGA device. Thierry Reding at NVIDIA along with support from other developers worked out adding this non-PCI graphics support on the X.Org Server side.

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Distrowatch Disappearance, RentOS 7 Coming, and OSS Lost

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-s

In tonight's Linux news, Distrowatch.com went offline for much of Sunday. Serdar Yegulalp looks at the upcoming CentOS7, the first since joining hands with Red Hat officially. Bruce Byfield says Open Source has lost its way and is now wandering aimlessly with no purpose. And that's not all.

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Qualcomm Retracts Its Massive DMCA Takedown Of Git Repositories

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Development

As a follow-up to the story about a Qualcomm DMCA notice taking down 100+ repositories of open-source code on GitHub, Qualcomm has changed course.

Qualcomm has reversed its take-down notice and has allowed the 100+ Git repositories to re-appear. Qualcomm came under pressure and likely took a look at the reported files to realize they weren't confidential, with some of the take-down requests being over Android kernel source files and code from CyanogenMod, Sony Xperia, and even their own QCA repository.

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Leftovers: Screenshots

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Reviews
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