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Sunday, 25 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Molecular Health Migrates to Red Hat Enterprise Linux for SAP HANA® for Medical Data Management Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 3:30pm
Story Fedora & EFI mount problem = failed boot Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 3:20pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 3:11pm
Story How to install Linux on a Chromebook (and why you should) Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 2:44pm
Story That's random: OpenBSD adds more kernel security Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 2:40pm
Story Fedora: Atomic/Cloud Test Day, AMA, and New Features Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 9:26am
Story Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 9:22am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 1 19/06/2017 - 9:20am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 8:37am
Story 13 reasons why you need Linux in your life Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2017 - 7:34am

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 Beta now available

Filed under
Red Hat

This morning Red Hat has announced the release of RHEL 7.4 Beta providing a "rich and stable foundation for both existing applications and a new generation of workloads and solutions".

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Parted Magic Disk Partitioning Live CD Updated with Linux 4.11.4, ZFS on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Parted Magic creator Patrick Verner announced today the release and immediate availability of the Parted Magic 2017_06_12 updated ISO image of the commercial GNU/Linux distribution designed for disk partitioning and maintenance tasks.

Powered by the latest Linux 4.11.4 kernel, Parted Magic 2017_06_12 includes all sorts of up-to-date components, including the Clonezilla 3.25.11 partition and disk imaging/cloning program, Wxfixboot 2.0.1 tool for modifying and fixing bootloaders, as well as DDRescue-GUI 1.7.1 graphical user interface for GNU ddrescue.

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Exton|OS Linux Is Now Based on Ubuntu 17.04, Ships with MATE 1.18 and Linux 4.11

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After informing us of the release of a new build of his Android-based RaspAnd operating system for Raspberry Pi 3 and Raspberry Pi 2 single-board computers, Arne Exton announced the availability of Exton|OS Build 170609.

Coming about half a year after the previous update, Exton|OS Build 170609 seems to be a massive release that moves to the latest Linux 4.11 kernel series and updates the MATE desktop environment to version 1.18. All the core components in Exton|OS Build 170609 have been updated to their latest version as of June 7, 2017.

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Also: Linux Mint 18.2 'Sonya' Beta Ubuntu-based distribution now available with KDE or Xfce

Indians Migrate to GNU/Linux in the Wake of WannaCry

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • 'WannaHelp' secure cyber space from attacks

    'WannaHelp' is the response from free software enthusiasts in the city to cyber scares such as WannaCry which hit thousands of computers worldwide. Volunteers of Free Software Users Group,

  • Linux Install Fest at Central Library evokes good response

    The reports on WannaCry ransomware attack might have given enough reasons for the city folks to switch to other available free software options. Around 60 people attended the GNU/Linux Install Festival organized by State Central Library in association with Free Software Users Group, Thiruvananthapuram (FSUG TVM) and ICFOSS at library hall on Saturday.

    According to Praveen Arimbrathodiyil, free software activist, it was following the panic that resulted from WannaCry attack that such a festival was organized to inform the public about availability of safe alternatives. "Our aim is to create awareness on the free software and its benefits among the general public. It is mostly the youngsters who have responded to the invitation for the festival," said Praveen.

    Free installation of Linux software was the highlight of the festival, in which nearly 40 systems were installed with the operating system.

    "I had installed both Windows and Linux in the laptop many year ago. It may be the lack of institutional support for these free software that people tend to go for other options. The government should take initiative to convert the systems in college and government institutions to free software," said Sriram V, chief librarian at CDS, who attended the festival.

  • ‘Too much jargon hurting free software’

    The ICFOSS personnel demonstrated the basics of installing free software, alternatives to Windows applications, and about user groups, forums and community support. A free software fest organised at the State Central Library on Saturday witnessed scores of people installing Linux operating system in their laptops even as many others sat in rapt attention listening to experts speak about free software and its benefits. Proponents of free software also should take part of the blame for this as they often clouded the minds of computer users with their technical jargon. Organised by the International Centre for Free and Open Source Software (ICFOSS), in association with the Thiruvananthapuram chapter of the Free Software Users Group (FSUG), and Society for Promotion of Alternative Computing Employment (SPACE), the GNU Linux installation festival was inaugurated by Achuthsankar S. Nair, Director, Centre of Bioinformatics, University of Kerala. The fest saw a healthy attendance by both software aficionados and the merely curious ones.

Linux in Cars

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu Graphics and Snappy Improvements

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Devs Begin Testing Wayland on Computers with AMD, Nvidia and Intel GPUs

    Now that they choose to ditch their powerful Unity desktop environment for GNOME, the Ubuntu Desktop development team has a lot of work on their hands testing various components and technologies that aren't quite familiar.

    In his report last week, Canonical's Will Cooke revealed the fact that the Ubuntu Desktop team is working hard on implementing a testing infrastructure based on the company's MAAS (Metal as a Service) and TestFlinger technologies to test various scenarios on a wide range of physical hardware.

  • Tuning your Intel graphics card in Ubuntu 16.04

    Eons ago I wrote a guide on how you can install Intel graphics drivers on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. That guide is still good and it should still work but with a few caveats which we will examine below. I have subsequently discovered that further tweaks and tuning are required in order to get that perfect graphics set up.

  • Snappy Is Finally Doing Something About Super Large App Sizes

    Ubuntu is finally doing something to tackle the size of Snap apps, albeit only for GNOME apps at present. A new GNOME platform snap is available in for testing in the testing channel of the Snap store. This snap will allow devs to build and distribute smaller GNOME Snap apps.

Games: Oculus Rift CV1 on GNU/Linux, Geneshift, The Underground King, XCOM 2 and More

Filed under
Gaming

Makers of the $249 Litebook Linux laptop launch mini-desktop and a bigger (and pricier) laptop

Filed under
Linux

The Alpha Litebook is a cheap laptop with a full HD 14 inch display, at least 4GB of RAM and a Linux-based operating system called Elementary OS. The team behind the laptop launched the Litebook in March.

Now they’re back with two new computers. The Alpha Centurion is a higher-power laptop with a 15.6 inch display, an Intel Core i7 processor, 8GB of RAM, and a starting price of $429.

Alpha’s new Litebox is a tiny desktop computer with a starting price of $249. Both ship with Elementary OS.

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Open source RF signal generator features WiFi

Filed under
OSS

An Arduino-Due based “ERASynth” RF signal generator starts at $499, and offers WiFi and a multiloop integer-N PLL for better performance and reduced noise.

Istanbul, Turkey based startup ERA Instruments has successfully funded its open spec ERASynth RF signal generator on Crowd Supply, having raised over $30,000. The ERASynth offers some features found on much more expensive commercial RF signal generators, including WiFi and a multiloop integer-N PLL, says ERA Instruments. The device is available through June 16 selling for $499 (10MHz to 6GHz) or $749 (250kHz to 15GHz) for the ERASynth+ model, with shipments due Sep. 21. he product also stands out with its open schematics and open source firmware and GUI software.

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No lack of Linux IoT projects

Filed under
Linux

It is a Linux world, and the rest of computing is just living in it—often literally, thanks to containerisation. The Internet of Things (IoT), in all of its manifold forms, is no exception, and the Linux Foundation lists these seven projects as the key players in the march of connected open-source systems. Here’s a quick rundown.

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macOS 10.12.5 vs. Ubuntu 17.04 vs. Clear Linux On A Mac Mini

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I posted some fresh macOS vs. Linux Intel OpenGL benchmarks while for those curious about the CPU performance, here are some additional benchmarks from that Mac Mini system.

Like the OpenGL graphics tests, these CPU-focused Mac benchmarks were done from the Mac Mini with Core i5 4278U Haswell CPU, 8GB RAM, 1TB Apple HDD, and Intel integrated graphics. MacOS 10.12.5 was tested with its Xcode 8.3.3 Clang-based compiler stack and other stock packages.

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We can now detect recurrent events in GNOME Calendar

Filed under
GNOME

Yes! We cleared the first hurdle in adding recurrence support to GNOME Calendar.

Now GNOME Calendar is smart enough to detect if an event has recurrences or not.

We added a new property – ‘has-recurrence‘ – to GcalEvent. Evolution API took most of the load off our shoulders as it already had a function ‘e_cal_component_has_recurrences()‘ which served our purpose.

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Tanglu 4 GNU/Linux Distro Released with UEFI Support, KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Tanglu Linux developer Matthias Klumpp is proud to announce today the general availability of the final release of the Tanglu 4 GNU/Linux operating system with both GNOME and KDE flavors.

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Zorin OS 12 Lite Beta Adopts Xfce as Default Desktop Environment Instead of LXDE

Filed under
OS

Zorin Group is announcing today the release of a Beta version of the upcoming Zorin OS 12 Lite edition of the Ubuntu-based operating system, designed for old computers with low hardware specifications.

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Ubuntu Desktop – GNOME Extensions poll results

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Recently, with the help from our friends at OMG! Ubuntu, we ran a poll to collect data on usefulness of some GNOME Shell extensions. We limited the poll to a select group of extensions based on popularity on https://extensions.gnome.org as well as how they changed the user experience. The poll was done with Google forms, requiring the user to be logged in, which helped to prevent the poll from being abused. However it was anonymous and we did not collect any identifying information.

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Ubuntu & UKUI desktop - Not a good idea

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are several findings here. One, UKUI does not look or behave like Windows in any way, nor is it a suitable replacement as such, only wishful thinking. Moreover, it is also in no way superior to Unity, be it experience, consistency or performance. It's buggy, and it comes with a rainbow of clashing styles and problems.

Two, the removal process is a mess. Painful, and to be frank, impossible. It should not take so much time trying to restore your desktop to defaults. You get rid of the packages, and the stuff is still there. Seriously? What! Am I using Windows ME?

Three, stick with Unity, or if you don't like it, go for KDE or Xfce. But not this. I am really surprised by my test today. I was expecting such good things, instead I had to battle frustration and anger, and I wasted precious time trying to get rid of something that should be a simple one-liner. I don't know why or how, but I find UKUI to be unsuitable for day to day use, and I must caution you against using it, because it renders irreversible changes in the desktop, and alters the look of other Gnome-based desktops. Until the next time, regretfully yours, Dedoimedo.

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Essential Applications for GNU/Linux Users

So, you’ve made the switch from Windows or MacOSX to GNU/Linux, congratulations! There is a good chance that you’ve also installed a distribution like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, or perhaps Manjaro; and so you have a wide range of software already installed. However, There are a number of applications that don’t always ship by default, that I feel every user should have or at least be aware of, and some that people have by default but have not ventured to use; so I thought a list of essential applications was in order! Read more