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Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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3 open source alternatives to PowerPoint

Filed under
OSS

PowerPoint is one of those programs whose use has become so ingrained in the corporate world that it is probably running the risk of becoming completely genericized, in the same way that some people use Kleenex to refer to all tissues, or BAND-AIDs to refer to all bandages.

But presenting a slideshow doesn't have to mean using PowerPoint. There are a number of totally capable open source alternatives to PowerPoint for giving visual presentations. In many cases, the features of these “alternatives” are so compelling that, unless you're absolutely forced to use PowerPoint, I don't know why you still would.

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MEP: publicly funded software should be public

Filed under
OSS

Software developed with public funds should be made available as free and open source software, says Member of the European Parliament Julia Reda. Sharing source code should become a standard in IT procurement across the EU, the MEP says.

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Dutch tax office looking for Linux-on-mainframe supplier

Filed under
Linux

The Dutch Tax and Customs Administration (Belastingdienst) is looking for a supplier of the Linux operating system for its IBM System z mainframes.

The public tender comprises provision of the operating system for four IFL processors for a period of one year, and maintenance of and support for the platform for eight years. The latter term can twice be extended by a further year.

The contract will be awarded to the supplier offering the lowest price. Bids must be received by 24 October, and the contract will start on 1 December.

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Tiny $2 IoT module runs FreeRTOS on Realtek Ameba WiFi SoC

Filed under
Linux

Pine64’s $2 “PADI IoT Stamp” module is based on Realtek’s new “RTL8710AF” Cortex-M3 WiFi SoC, a cheaper FreeRTOS-ready competitor to the ESP8266.

Realtek’s RTL8710AF WiFi system-on-chip began showing up on tiny “B&T” labeled modules in July in China on AliExpress, as described in this Hackaday post. The Realtek SoC offers an even lower cost, and almost identical alternative to Espressif’s similarly Cortex-M3 based ESP8266 WiFi SoC. The Cortex-M3 based RTL8710AF costs a bit over $3 individually, but can be had for as little as $1.99 in volume.

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CUPS 2.2 Printing System Out Now to Support Local IPP Everywhere Print Queues

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Apple announced the release of a new stable version of its open-source CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System) software used in the macOS operating system and all GNU/Linux distributions.

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Logic Supply Launches Intel Skylake Panel PCs Powered by Ubuntu 14.04, Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

Logic Supply informs Softpedia today that it launched a new line of modular panel PCs during the International Manufacturing Technology Show 2016 (IMTS) event that is taking place this week until Saturday, September 18, in Chicago, U.S.A.

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Linux's lack of software is a myth

Filed under
Linux

There is nothing I can’t do on my Linux-powered computers. And no other platform works so much better that I feel the need to move to it.

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GNOME Maps App Won't Bring Public Transit Routing to the GNOME 3.22 Desktop

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME Maps developer Marcus Lundblad talks in his latest blog post about some of the major new features coming to the GNOME Maps application as part of the soon-to-be-released GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

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Also: Mutter Window Manager Gets More Wayland Fixes Before the Launch of GNOME 3.22

GNOME's File Roller Archive Manager to No Longer Offer a Nautilus Extension

Ghost Blogging With a Pi

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

I’ve read that a fun and easy thing to do with a Raspberry Pi is to set it up as a dedicated blog server. I’ve never really had my own blog, so I decided I would give this project a shot. I hope that this article serves as a guide for those of you who would like to start a blog or who have a Raspberry Pi that’s not doing anything and are looking for a worthy project.

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Latest openSUSE Tumbleweed Snapshots Bring Wine 1.9.18, Glibc 2.24 & Mesa 12.0.2

Filed under
SUSE

The first snapshots for the month of September have been released for the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system, and Douglas DeMaio is here again to report on the freshly added software versions.

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Flatpak 0.6.10 Makes the Dependency on systemd in the User Session Optional

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Flatpak developer Alex Larsson announced the release of Flatpak 0.6.10, a new maintenance update of the universal Linux binary format used in various GNU/Linux distributions.

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Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator: Theary Sorn

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

I grew up with the Windows platform and I saw that we had to pay a license fee to be able to use it, which is something I didn’t want. Then I saw that Linux is the open source system that can be used for free, and we can pretty much do anything we want and more than can be done with Windows.

I've used many open source tools and technologies and I loved the way they work. I am a true fan of Linux and open source.

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Unity Engine gets patched with 5.4.0 P4, Brings bug fixes to Tizen and other platforms

Filed under
Linux

The relationship between Tizen and Unity is building up very well over time. Off recently, Samsung even announced a Tizen App Challenge for Unity developers to bring more high quality Unity games on to the platform. Meanwhile, Unity have now patched their Game engine with version 5.4.0 P4 . The patch brings a lot of bug fixes and improvements across various platforms like Windows, OSX, Android, iOS and Tizen.

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LTS releases align neatly for Plasma 5.8

Filed under
KDE

Our upcoming release, Plasma 5.8 will be the first long-term supported (LTS) release of the Plasma 5 series. One great thing of this release is that it aligns support time-frames across the whole stack from the desktop through Qt and underlying operating systems. This makes Plasma 5.8 very attractive for users need to that rely on the stability of their computers.

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Debian-Based Q4OS 1.6.2 "Orion" Linux Distro Released with Small Improvements

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Debian

Softpedia was informed by the Q4OS Team about the availability of download of the second maintenance update to the Q4OS 1.6 "Orion" series of the Debian-based operating system.

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Bodhi 2.2.0 beta

Filed under
Linux

Hello Planet Fedora! I hope you are holding on to your hats, because Bodhi 2.2.0 is on its way to a Rawhide near you. But wait, that's not all - we will be updating Bodhi in EPEL 7 to the new 2.2.0 release as well.

The web server changes include a fix for CVE-2016-1000008 (thanks to Patrick Uiterwijk for reporting), some new features, and some bug fixes. The client changes will be more drastic when 2.2.0 reaches Rawhide, as the client in Rawhide has been behind for a while on a 0.9 release. Once 2.2.0 is released upstream, the 2.2 client will make its way into Rawhide. The client is a rewrite from the 0.9 series, and is not backwards compatible. There is a man page to guide you.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rocket League for Linux: The Definitive Video Review

    Rocket League blasted on to Linux at the end of last week and we were ridiculously about it — but perhaps you're not caught up in the excitement.

  • Last Minute Wayland Fixes For GNOME 3.22

    It looks like running the GNOME desktop environment natively on Wayland should be in pretty good shape after a round of last-minute improvements.

    GNOME 3.22 package updates this week provided a number of important Wayland fixes:

    Mutter 3.21.92 fixes for Wayland: absolute pointer motion events, animated cursors, various crashes, XWayland pointer warp emulation, and other non-Wayland improvements.

  • elementary OS 0.4 Loki Screencast and Screenshots
  • Who Needs the Internet of Things?

    This week, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced it has sold more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards and celebrated the milestone by releasing a new Raspberry Pi Starter Kit. While many of these Linux-driven hacker boards were used for the foundation’s original purpose -- creating a low-cost computer for computer education -- a large percentage have been sold to hobbyists and commercial developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects ranging from home automation to industrial sensor networks.

    Linux-driven open source and commercial single board computers and modules sit at the heart of the IoT phenomenon. They are usually found in the form of gateways or hubs that aggregate sensor data from typically wirelessly enabled, sensor-equipped endpoints. Sometimes these endpoints run Linux as well, but these are more often simpler, lower-power MCU-driven devices such as Arduino-based devices. Linux and Windows run the show in the newly IoT-savvy cloud platforms that are emerging to monitor systems and analyze data fed from the gateways in so-called fog ecosystems.

    Over the next few weeks, I’ll be analyzing the IoT universe, with a special focus on Linux and other open source technologies used in home and industrial automation. I’ll look at major open source products and projects, IoT-oriented hacker boards, security and privacy issues, and future trends.

  • Taunton’s open source success: a new era for electronic patient records

    Almost one year ago our organisation, Taunton and Somerset NHS FT, achieved an important milestone in delivering transformational change in our digital programme: we became the first NHS trust to go live with an open source electronic patient record (EPR).

    Some may have perceived this as a risky choice. An open source EPR was untested within the NHS, and NHS organisations can tend to do what everyone else has already tried. Yet we saw that, by having a flexible system that had no licence fees, we would be able to tailor the system as we went along, to suit the needs of our clinicians, patients and our healthcare partners in Somerset.

  • Navigating the challenges of international teamwork

    OpenEMR, OpenMRS, and VisTA are three of the most well-known open source applications in the health IT genre. OpenEMR has worldwide acceptance as a complete and flexible electronic healthcare records (EHR) system that can be tweaked with relative ease to work anywhere. That is evident in its adoption by the International Planned Parenthood Foundation, the Peace Corps, and most recently by the Health Services Dept of Israel. OpenMRS is a respected tool set and API that has been predominantly used in Africa, and has been adopted for targeted healthcare needs all over the world. Despite being a US-based project, its adoption in the US is minimal. VisTA is the US Veteran's Administration EHR and it is now, due mainly to the formation of OSEHRA.org, beginning to get traction in other countries as a solution to the high cost of proprietary EHR systems for hospitals. New on the horizon are projects like FHIR, started in Australia, and adopted by hl7.org.

  • Infostretch Adds New Open Source Test Automation Framework to QMetry Suite
  • Udacity plans to build its own open-source self-driving car

    Sebastian Thrun’s online education startup Udacity recently created a self-driving car engineering nanodegree, and on stage at Disrupt today Thrun revealed that the company intends to build its own self-driving car as part of the program, and that it also intends to open source the technology that results, so that “anyone” can try to build their own self-driving vehicle, according to Thrun.

    The crowdsourced vehicle plans will ultimately be created in service of the school, rather than a product in and of itself. The open-sourcing of the data should help other projects ramp up, and will include driving data and more to contribute to other people’s projects.

  • Q&A: SFU alumna launching new "open source" food co-op

    SFU alumna Jennifer Zickerman is making it easier to access locally grown, high quality herbs through her venture, the Lower Mainland Herb Growers Co-op.

    The co-operative offers economy of scale to local small growers growing culinary herbs. It will buy fresh herbs from local growers, then dry and package them as culinary herb blends and distribute them to retail stores.

    Zickerman first developed this business idea as a student in SFU's Community Economic Development (CED) program. She pitched it as part of the program's annual Social Innovation Challenge, winning $12,000 to implement her idea.

    The co-op's high quality products aim to replace the poor quality dried herbs found in most retail stores that are imported from countries with poor environmental and labour standards.

    Local farmers will also have a new market for a crop that grows well in this climate and requires few artificial supports such as fertilizer, pesticides and greenhouses.

  • Chile's green energy future is powered by open data analysis

    Open source software and open data play key roles in implementing Chile's long-term energy planning, identifying ways to get the maximum value from development, minimizing its impact, and requiring less development overall.

    Over the past two years, our company—in partnership with the Centro UC Cambio Global of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile—has been designing, building, and testing a framework to support Chile's Ministry of Energy in policy evaluation and regional hydroelectric power planning activities. Open source software and open data play a key role in this framework, but before I explain how, I need to summarize the context.

  • DYNAcity project starts mobility pilot in Flemish City of Ghent

    The mobility service is based on information published on the open data portal of the City of Ghent. It also incorporates data from innovative sources like thermal cameras and a carpool system. Participants in the pilot will receive travel advice each morning through a pop-up on their mobile phones.

  • Just Because It Says ‘Open Source Hardware’ Doesn’t Mean It Really Is

    David L. Jones, an electronics design engineer based in Sydney Australia, explains his pragmatic solution to the use of the open source hardware logo — inspired by the varying gradations of the Creative Commons licenses.

  • How to help developers help themselves

    Developers need help. It comes with the territory for software companies employing thousands of developers, many who live and work in remote locations all over the world. At Red Hat, Rafael Benevides doles out lots of help. He teaches developers about tools and practices so they can be more productive, and he'll be taking the show on the road for the tech conference All Things Open this year where he'll share his specfic thoughts on cloud development.

  • Adblock Plus finds the end-game of its business model: Selling ads

    Eyeo GmbH, the company that makes the popular Adblock Plus software, will today start selling the very thing many of its users hate—advertisements. Today, the company is launching a self-service platform to sell "pre-whitelisted" ads that meet its "acceptable ads" criteria. The new system will let online publishers drag and drop advertisements that meet Eyeo's expectations for size and labeling.

    "The Acceptable Ads Platform helps publishers who want to show an alternative, nonintrusive ad experience to users with ad blockers by providing them with a tool that lets them implement Acceptable Ads themselves,” said Till Faida, co-founder of Adblock Plus.

    Publishers who place the ads will do so knowing that they won't be blocked by most of the 100 million Adblock Plus users. The software extension's default setting allows for "acceptable ads" to be shown, and more than 90 percent of its users don't change that default setting.

    Eyeo started its "acceptable ads" program in 2011. With the new platform, it hopes to automate and scale up a process that until now has been a cumbersome negotiation. What once could take weeks, the company boasts in today's statement, now "takes only seconds."

  • 5 Ways The Modern World Is Shockingly Ready To Collapse

    As technology embraces the digital, abandoning the crude and primitive notion of "physical existence" entirely, the idea that you actually own the media you buy is vanishing faster than that goddamn Walkman you swore was in the closet. And it's more than inconvenient for consumers; it may be apocalyptic for our society.

    [...]

    If you tried to purchase an Adobe product recently, you're already aware of this trend. As of 2013, you can no longer buy programs such as Photoshop, Flash, or Dreamweaver. You can only "subscribe" to them for a monthly fee. Yes, now you have the privilege of paying for your software forever. Isn't the future wonderful?

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More in Tux Machines

Solus Gets MATE 1.16 Desktop Environment and Linux Kernel 4.7.5, Up-to-Date Apps

Joshua Strobl from the Solus Project published a new installation of the distribution's weekly newsletter, This Week in Solus 36, to inform Solus users about the latest software updates and other important changes in the Linux OS. Read more

7 Ways Linux Users Differ from Windows Users

To casual users, one person at a keyboard looks much the same as any other. Watch for a while, however, and the differences start to emerge -- and whether they are using Linux or Windows is the least of them. The fact is, Linux users are different from Windows users in attitude as much as their choice of operating system. Originating as a Unix-type operating system and in opposition to Windows, Linux has developed an expectation and a philosophy in direct opposition to those promoted by Windows. Although many new Linux users have come directly from Windows, average Linux users simply do not react in the same way as Windows users. Read more

Security News

  • Sloppy programming leads to OpenSSL woes
  • OpenSSL Fixes Critical Bug Introduced by Latest Update
    OpenSSL today released an emergency security update after a patch in its most recent update issued last week introduced a critical vulnerability in the cryptographic library.
  • The Internet Of Poorly Secured Things Is Fueling Unprecedented, Massive New DDoS Attacks
    Last week, an absolutely mammoth distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack brought down the website of security researcher Brian Krebs. His website, hosted by Akamai pro bono, was pulled offline after it was inundated with 620Gbps of malicious traffic, nearly double the size of the biggest attack Akamai (which tracks such things via their quarterly state of the internet report) has ever recorded. Krebs was ultimately able to get his website back online after Google stepped in to provide DDoS mitigation through its Project Shield service.
  • Trump Offers More Insight On His Cybersecurity Plans: 10-Year-Old Relatives Vs. 400-lb Bedroom Dwellers
    Look, anyone who refers to cybersecurity or cyberwarfare as "the cyber" is probably better off not discussing this. But Donald Trump, in last night's debate, felt compelled to further prove why he's in no position to be offering guidance on technological issues. And anyone who feels compelled to portray hackers as 400-lb bedroom dwellers probably shouldn't be opening their mouth in public at all. With this mindset, discussions about what "the Google" and "the Facebook" are doing about trimming back ISIS's social media presence can't be far behind. Trump did note that ISIS is "beating us at our game" when it comes to utilizing social media. Fair enough.

Servers/Networks

  • Docker Doubles Down on Microsoft Windows Server [Ed: recall "DockerCon 2015 Infiltrated by Microsoft"]
    Docker for Windows debuts alongside a new commercial support relationship with Microsoft. For the most part, the Docker container phenomenon has been about Linux, with the majority of all deployments on Linux servers. But that could soon be changing as Docker Inc. today is announcing the general availability of Docker Engine on Windows Server 2016, alongside a new commercial support and distribution agreement with Microsoft. Docker containers rely on the host operating system for certain isolation and process elements in order to run. On Linux, those elements have always been present as part of the operating system, but the same was not true for Windows, which has required several years of joint engineering effort between Docker Inc. and Microsoft.
  • Hadoop Sandboxes and Trials Spread Out
    We all know that there is a skills gap when it comes to Hadoop in the Big Data market. In fact, Gartner Inc.'s 2015 Hadoop Adoption Study, involving 284 Gartner Research Circle members, found that only 125 respondents who completed the whole survey had already invested in Hadoop or had plans to do so within the next two years. The study found that there are difficulties in implementing Hadoop, including hardship in finding skilled Hadoop professionals.
  • Use models to measure cloud performance
    When I was young, I made three plastic models. One was of a car—a '57 Chevy. Another was of a plane—a Spitfire. And a third was of the Darth Vader TIE Fighter. I was so proud of them. Each one was just like the real thing. The wheels turned on the car, and the plane’s propeller moved when you blew on it. And of course, the TIE Fighter had Darth Vader inside. When I went to work on the internet, I had to measure things. As I discussed in my last post, Measure cloud performance like a customer, when you measure on the internet you need to measure in ways that are representative of your customers’ experiences. This affects how you measure in two ways. The first is the perspective you take when measuring, which I talked about last time. The second way is the techniques you use to perform those measurements. And those techniques are, in effect, how you make a model of what you want to know. Those childhood plastic models turn out to offer some solid guidance after all.
  • ODPi Adds Apache Hive to Runtime Specification 2.0
    Today, ODPi announced that the ODPi Runtime Specification 2.0 will add Apache Hive and Hadoop Compatible File System support (HCFS). These components join YARN, MapReduce and HDFS from ODPi Runtime Specification 1.0 With the addition of Apache Hive to the Runtime specification, I thought it would be a good time to share why we added Apache Hive and how we are strategically expanding the Runtime specification.
  • Ubuntu’s OpenStack on IBM’s Big Iron
    If I were Red Hat I would be looking over my shoulder right now; it appears that Ubuntu might be gaining. In just a few years the Linux distribution has gone from being non-existent in the enterprise to being a powerhouse. This is especially true in the cloud, where it's a dominant force on both sides of the aisle. Not only is it the most deployed operating system on public clouds, its version of OpenStack accounts for over half of OpenStack cloud deployments, used by the likes of Deutsche Telekom, Bloomberg and Time Warner Cable.