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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:18am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:14am
Story The Best Free Office Suites for Linux in 2018 Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:13am
Story 10 Best Media Server Software for Linux in 2018 Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 9:11am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 8:50am
Story Add ‘New Document’ Option in Right Click Context Menu in Ubuntu 18.04 itsfoss 16/04/2018 - 8:34am
Story For project safety backup your people, not just your data Roy Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 8:31am
Story Linux 4.17 RC 1 Roy Schestowitz 1 16/04/2018 - 8:16am
Story Android: postmarketOS Update, Android P Names, and Fuchsia Friday Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 7:30am
Story Review: Neptune 5.0 Rianne Schestowitz 16/04/2018 - 7:24am

​How many Linux users are there anyway?

Filed under
Android
Linux

Perhaps the most unbiased numbers are from the federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP). DAP's numbers come from the billion visits over the past 90 days to over 400 US executive branch government domains. That's about 5,000 total websites. These visitors appear to be largely US citizens. You can see this from the most popular websites: The US Postal Service, the IRS, and Medline Plus.

By DAP's count, Linux is bundled in with 0.6 percent other. Chrome OS, according to DAP, has more users: 1.3 percent.

Still, while desktop Linux is a minority desktop operating system, it still has millions of users, and that's a lot more than a mere fraction of 1 percent.

And, when it comes to overall end-user operating system, Linux-based Android has 70.96 percent of the mobile market by NetMarketShare's count. By DAP's reckoning, Android has 19.9 percent of all end-user systems, while StatCounter shows Android as even more popular than Windows by 39.49 percent to 36.62 percent.

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Stable kernels 4.16.1, 4.14.33, 4.9.93, 4.4.127 and 3.18.103

Filed under
Linux

Linux 4.16.1 and Outline of the Past Week for Linux 4.17 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.16.1

    I'm announcing the release of the 4.16.1 kernel.

    All users of the 4.16 kernel series must upgrade.

  • Linux 4.16 Reaches Its First Point Release With Over 30 Fixes

    Greg Kroah-Hartman today released the first stable point update to the Linux 4.16 kernel that debuted one week ago.

    There are just under three dozen changes in Linux 4.16.1, including some crypto fixes seeming to represent a bulk of the work along with some USB, staging, serial, Bluetooth, and other updates. One hardware item sticking out is fixed TrackStick detection for Lenovo ThinkPad L570 and Dell Latitude 7370 notebooks.

  • The Big Changes Merged This Week For The Linux 4.17 Kernel

    We are now through the first week of the two week long Linux 4.17 kernel merge window process for introducing the new features/functionality to this next big kernel release.

[Old] Distributions are becoming irrelevant: difference was our strength and our liability

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

For someone that has spent the past thirteen years defining himself as a developer of a Linux distribution (whether I really am still a Gentoo Linux developer or not is up for debate I’m sure), having to write a title like this is obviously hard. But from the day I started working on open source software to now I have grown a lot, and I have realized I have been wrong about many things in the past.

One thing that I realized recently is that nowadays, distributions lost the war. As the title of this post says, difference is our strength, but at the same time, it is also the seed of our ruin. Take distributions: Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Archlinux, Ubuntu. They all look and act differently, focusing on different target users, and because of this they differ significantly in which software they make available, which versions are made available, and how much effort is spent on testing, both the package itself and the system integration.

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FreeCAD 0.17 Released With Various Workbench Improvements

Filed under
GNU

For fans of the FreeCAD open-source 3D CAD modeling software, a new major release is now available -- the first update in almost two years.

FreeCAD 0.17 is now available to succeed FreeCAD 0.16 from April of 2016. While it may not be nearly as well off as AutoCAD or other alternatives, FreeCAD does continue getting better while being free and open-source software.

Read more

Original: Release notes 0.17

Fedora: Fedora Local Repo, Rawhide Notes and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Local Repo

    Let’s suppose that you want to test a package not yet landed in the Fedora repos, include it in the installation process or in a Live CD (more on a future post).

  • Rawhide notes from the trail: more rocky trail

    I am looking forward to next week when we hope to get things setup for some gating in rawhide. I know it couldn’t handle all these issues, but it’s a start and we can add things as we know how to detect them in advance.

  • Installing go1.10.1 (Fedora 27)

Making cloud-native computing universal and sustainable

Filed under
Server

I’ve been fortunate to have the opportunity to build an open source foundation from scratch the last couple of years by serving as the founding executive director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Since late 2015, the foundation has grown to comprise more than 200 members worldwide and 18 innovative cloud-native projects. Also, for the first time, we recently published an annual report representing what our community accomplished in 2017.

What has been interesting about this experience is that more people know about our projects, such as Kubernetes, Envoy, and Prometheus, than know about the open source foundation behind them. The goal of this article is to explain exactly what the purpose of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is and how we support our community of cloud-native open infrastructure projects.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Timespinner is an upcoming metroidvania that’s looking great and is fun to play

    Following a successful crowdfunding campaign several years ago, this 2d metroidvania has grown and matured as a project. I had a chance to play a closed beta and things look promising.

  • What’s New in Enso OS 0.2.1

    Enso OS 0.2.1 is the latest release of Enso Linux Distribution 0.2 series. This release features Xfce 4.12 series as default desktop environment, include the Panther application launcher, which it can resizing itself on change of the screen resolution. Also Plank dock installed by default.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS and using Linux Kernel 4.4, which means that it offers support for the latest hardware components available on the market. Galal now includes a new windows switcher that lists the active windows in a much more easy to read manner that is more familiar to users than was previously implemented. Enso greeter now applies a nice blur effect onto the set background which was kindly taken from the Deepin project

  • What Else Will Red Hat Acquire?

    Linux may not be the OS of choice for desktops, but it dominates the world when it comes to supercomputers, web servers, and Chromebooks. Additionally, Linux Kernel actually powers the Android OS that is used in Android-based mobile devices. According to market reports, as of 2017, Linux powered all of the top 500 supercomputers in the world.

  • Fedora 28 : Golang by JetBrains .
  • Debian & Stuff -- Montreal Debian Meeting

    Today we had a meeting of the local Montreal Debian group. The last meetings we had were centered on working on finishing the DebConf17 final report and some people told us they didn't feel welcome because they weren't part of the organisation of the conference.

    I thus decided to call today's event "Debian & Stuff" and invite people to come hack with us on diverse Debian related projects. Most of the people who came were part of the DC17 local team, but a few other people came anyway and we all had a great time. Someone even came from Ottawa to learn how to compile the Linux kernel!

  • Linux Mint Launching SFF MintBox Mini 2 and Mini 2 Pro PCs Running Linux Mint 19

    The Linux Mint development team recently announced the MintBox Mini 2 and MintBox Mini 2 Pro small form factor PCs which will ship with Linux Mint 19 this summer. The tiny passively cooled computers are based on Compulab’s Fitlet2 SFF barebones PC and comes in two flavors: the base Mini 2 with Intel Celeron J3455, 4GB DDR3L, and 64GB SATA SSD and the Mini 2 Pro with J3455 processor, 8GB RAM, and 120GB solid state drive. The MintBox Mini 2 PCs measure 4.4” x 3.3” x 1.3” and weigh approximately 12 ounces.

howtos and software

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • How to set up a MegaRAID SAS 9361-8i controller card on an OpenPOWER system
  • Creating Virtual Disks Using Linux Command Line
  • 2-Minute Linux Tip: Learn how to use the contrab command
  • The Shuf Command Tutorial With Examples For Beginners
  • Using SS to monitor connections in GNU/Linux for new users

    The ever popular Netstat tool, has been depricated for quite a few years now, and newer tools have been developed for the command line to replace it; namely, ss.

    Using ss is extremely simple, given the power behind the command, and the amount of information you can obtain while using it, such as information for TCP, UDP, PACKET, RAW, DCCP and UNIX Sockets.

  • Pidgin 2.13 Linux Desktop Instant Messaging Client Released

    Desktop-based instant messaging clients are becoming increasingly rare in the age of mobile apps and browser-based alternatives, but Pidgin formerly known as GAIM continues moving along albeit slowly. Recently the Pidgin 2.13.0 release happened without much attention.

    Pidgin 2.13 was released back in March with a number of bug fixes, better support for dark themes, improved transparency handling, API updates, and more but it was mostly just about fixing a number of bugs. Pidgin 2.13.0 had been the first update in one year since Pidgin 2.12.

  • kTLS in Cubemap

    Cubemap, my video reflector, is getting TLS support. This isn't really because I think Cubemap video is very privacy-sensitive (although I suppose it does protect it against any meddling ISP middleboxes that would want to transcode the video), but putting non-TLS video on TLS pages is getting increasingly frowned upon by browsers—it used to provoke mixed content warnings, but now, it's usually just blocked outright.

    This took longer than one would expect, since Cubemap prides itself on extremely high performance. (Even when it was written, five years ago, it could sustain multiple 10gig links on a single, old quadcore.) Cubemap is different from regular HTTP servers in that it doesn't really care about small requests; it doesn't do HLS or MPEG-DASH (although HLS support is also on its way!), just a single very long stream of video, so startup time doesn't matter at all. To that extent, it uses sendfile() (from a buffer file, usually on tmpfs or similar), which wasn't compatible with TLS… until now.

  •  

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 1

    In the spirit of This week in Firefox/Rust/Servo, we’ve decided to start sharing weekly updates on the progress of the Mozilla Mixed Reality team. Late last year, we brought together all of the people working on Virtual and Augmented Reality at Mozilla to work in our new Mixed Reality program.

  • Microsoft’s Open Source Tool To Run More Linux Distros on Windows
  • Open source isn’t the community you think it is [Ed: The usual from Mac Asay]

    Thirteen years ago, I dug into academic research that showed how Mozilla’s Firefox browser and the Apache HTTP Server were both developed by a small cadre of core contributors. While the population of contributors broadened with things like bug fixes, the central development work for these and virtually all other projects was done by a talented group of core committers.

  • ZeMarmot, main contributor of GIMP 2.10.0-RC1!

    Two weeks ago, we released GIMP 2.10.0-RC1! This is our first release candidate before the stable release GIMP 2.10.0. Yes, you heard it well, the release you have been waiting for, for 6 years, is just around the corner!

  • Matthew Garrett Calls on Symantec to Share Its Code, EFF Questions Google's Work on Project Maven and More

    Linux kernel developer, free software activist and Google engineer Matthew Garrett discovered that Symantec is using a Linux distro based on the QCA Software Development Kit (QSDK) project: "This is a GPLv2-licensed, open-source platform built around the Linux-based OpenWrt Wi-Fi router operating system" (if true, this means Symantic needs to share the Norton Core Router's code). So, Garrett tweeted "Hi @NortonOnline the Norton Core is clearly running Linux and the license requires you to distribute the kernel source code so where can I get it?"

  • Best Programming Language

    Python wins Best Programming Language again this year in Linux Journal's annual Readers' Choice Awards. It's easy to use, powerful and versatile with a really large and active community. Having that supportive community ensures that developers of all skill levels easily can find the support and documentation they require, which feeds Python's popularity. It certainly helps that Python has something like a corporate sponsor. Python is recognized as an official language at Google, running on many of its internal systems and showing up in many Google APIs. In fact, Google's developer website offers free Python classes, videos and exercises.

Microsoft's Excellence

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft Might Start Showing Ads in Windows 10 Mail App

    The latest update for the Mail app in Windows 10 appears to include something that nobody expected: a small ad in the lower left corner that recommends users to “Get Office 365.”
    By the looks of things, only a small number of users get this new button in their Mail app, judging from this discussion on reddit. There doesn’t seem to be a pattern to trigger the ad to show up, but the Get Office 365 banner is only displayed when the left pane isn’t collapsed.

    Mail doesn’t show any banner on Windows 10 for me, even after updating to the latest version of the app, which is 17.9126.21425.0 and was released today.

  • Office 365 Services Hit by Outage, Outlook, Skype, OneDrive Down - April 6, 2018

    Microsoft’s Office 365 is down once again, with users in Europe reporting issues connecting to their accounts. Services like Outlook, Skype, and OneDrive are currently not available.
    While Microsoft hasn’t released a statement to acknowledge the problems, DownDetector seems to point that several European countries are affected. Parts of the United Kingdom, Belgium, Sweden, Germany, France, Italy, and Latvia are most affected.

    Somewhat surprising is that Microsoft’s Office 365 service health page claims “everything is up and running” with all services that users indicate to be down, including Outlook, OneDrive, and Yammer said to be running properly.

    Some users reveal that Exchange clients work correctly, and only the web access appears to be impacted by the outage. Others point out they’re not able to login to Skype and their password is being refused. Several said that they can send emails but not receive anything.

  • Office 365 goes down across Europe, again

    Users attempting to access Office 365 email are reportedly being greeted with an 'AADSTS90033' error message, alongside the unhelpful warning: "Service is temporarily unavailable. Please retry later."

    The AADSTS90033 error message is typically displayed under normal circumstances when a user cannot get a token from Azure for the services they need to access.

CentOS 7.4 upgrade - Still got it

Filed under
Red Hat

The upgrade of CentOS to 7.4 (1708) worked fine. I did hit a few snags, but they were entirely due to my own use of third party sources. Once I had that ironed out, the process was robust. Even my extra programs were correctly carried over, all except Skype. Not bad, given that I have a beautiful, slick, and fully functional desktop with ten years of stability and support.

Now, not all is golden. The old kernel 3.X is not as fast as the new 4.X stuff, and you can feel it. CentOS is pretty nimble, but modern distros are nimbler. And Plasma 5 is superior to KDE 4. Which is in fact my next project. See if I can get a custom kernel running and perhaps even grab Plasma. I'm not in the mood for excessive manual labor and compilations, but this might be doable.

All in all, for those comfortable with running a somewhat conservative server distro with top-notch stability and many years of updates, and who do not mind not having always the latest and greatest stuff, CentOS 7.4 makes for an almost ideal candidate. Actually, the ideal candidate would have kernel 4.15 and Plasma, but that's a story for another time. Anyway, 18 months of neglect have got nothing on CentOS. Linux on.

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Graphics: Sway 1.0 Reaches Alpha, NVIDIA Preparing To Drop Fermi Support, VKVG: Vulkan Vector Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Sway 1.0 Reaches Alpha For This Popular Wayland Compositor

    The Sway Wayland Compositor that is known for its compatibility and inspiration from the i3 tiling window manager is nearly out with its version 1.0 release.

    Sway 1.0 Alpha was released this Saturday evening as the first step towards the big 1.0 milestone. This release is now based on the wlroots Wayland compositor library and the code-base itself to the compositor was completely overhauled. In the process, the NVIDIA proprietary driver support was also removed.

  • NVIDIA Preparing To Drop Fermi Support From Their Mainline Drivers

    NVIDIA is in the process of retiring GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" GPU support from their mainline graphics drivers on Windows and Linux/BSD/Solaris.

    Yesterday NVIDIA announced that critical security updates for Fermi series GPUs will continue through January 2019, but after that be cut off while for now they will still be issuing "Game Ready Driver" (Windows) drivers with Fermi support included.

  • VKVG: Vulkan Vector Graphics With A Cairo-Like API

    The latest nifty open-source Vulkan project we have come across worthy of a shout-out is VKVG. VKVG is short for Vulkan Vector Graphics and is a C library for drawing 2D vector graphics using the Vulkan graphics API.

POWER Updates For Linux 4.17 Drop POWER4 CPU Support

Filed under
Linux

In addition to Linux 4.17 dropping eight obsolete CPU architectures, this next kernel release is also doing away with POWER4 CPU support.

The IBM POWER4 architecture dates back to 2001 for RS/6000 and AS/400 computers with just above 1.0GHz clock frequencies, dual cores, and around a 115 Watt TDP. POWER4 was succeeded by POWER5 in 2004. While POWER4 and POWER4+ support is removed, PowerPC 970 and POWER5 and newer support remains.

It turns out back in 2016, the POWER4 CPU support was accidentally broken and with no one noticing the past two years, developers have decided to just do away with this older PowerPC architecture. This frees up some maintenance burden and "blocked use of some modern instructions."

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Important Kernel Update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Patches 39 Security Vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

After releasing a major kernel update for the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system series on both 64/32-bit and Raspberry Pi 2 devices, Canonical released an important kernel update for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems.

The new kernel update published earlier this week addresses a total of 39 security vulnerabilities for the long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series and its official derivatives, including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio.

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Debian GNU/Linux Operating System Is Now Supported on 64-bit RISC-V Hardware

Filed under
Debian

If you want to use the Debian GNU/Linux operating system on 64-bit RISC-V devices, you should know that there's now an official port for the RISC-V 64-bit (riscv64) architecture in Debian infrastructure.

The announcement comes from developer Manuel Fernandez Montecelo, who said that after a few weeks of hard work, he and his team managed to do an official 64-bit RISC-V bootstrap, which is now available in Debian Project's debian-ports infrastructure for those who want to download packages on their RISC-V devices.

“We've been working in the last few weeks to do a (second) bootstrap of Debian for RISC-V, and after a few weeks of hard work it is now bootstrapped and has been imported into the Debian infrastructure, in particular, debian-ports," said Manuel Fernandez Montecelo in the announcement.

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12 Best GTK Themes for Ubuntu and other Linux Distributions

Let’s have a look at some of the beautiful GTK themes that you can use not only in Ubuntu but other Linux distributions that use GNOME.
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AMD Ryzen 7 Performance On Windows 10, Windows Server 2016, Six Linux Distributions

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Our latest Windows vs. Linux benchmarking interest has been seeing how the AMD Ryzen 7 performance compares with the latest operating systems / Linux distributions. We have recently posted some Windows 10 vs. Windows WSL vs. Windows Linux benchmarks, relative Spectre/Meltdown mitigation impact tests on Windows vs. Linux, and other benchmarks but has mostly been done with Intel or server hardware. For those curious, today's tests were done with an AMD Ryzen 7 1700 platform.

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Android Leftovers

Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more