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Monday, 27 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:34am
Story Exploiting Recursion in the Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:26am
Story Parrot Security OS 3.0 Ethical Hacking Distro Is Out, Now Ready for Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:22am
Story ubuntuBSD 16.04 Will Feature a Combination of BusyBox and OpenRC, But No systemd Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:20am
Story Secure home automation, without clouds or dedicated hubs Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:18am
Story Android apps on Chromebook review: Is it ready for mainstream use? Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:13am
Story Now you can install Android TV on a PC (unofficially) Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 7:10am
Story Wiznote An Evernote Alternative & Linux Note Taking App Mohd Sohail 21/06/2016 - 6:11am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/06/2016 - 5:04am
Story Why You Should Use Ubuntu LTS Rianne Schestowitz 20/06/2016 - 10:39pm

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Snap Packages Become the Universal Binary Format for All GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Today, June 14, 2016, Canonical informed us that they've been working for some time with developers from various major GNU/Linux distributions to make the Snap package format universal for all OSes.

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“Gtk 5.0 is not Gtk 5”

Filed under
GNOME

The last post explained the new version policy that we hope to use for the future of Gtk. This post aims to explain some of the benefits of that system, and also why we considered, but ultimately rejected some other options.

The first major takeaway from the new system (and the part that people have been most enthusiastic about) is the fact that this gives many application authors and desktop environments something that they have been asking for for a long time: a versions of Gtk that has the features of Gtk 3, but the stability of Gtk 2. Under the proposed scheme, that version of Gtk 3 will be here in about a year. Gtk version (let’s say) 3.26 will be permanently stable, with all of the nice new features that have been added to Gtk 3 over the last 5+ years.

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Kernel Space/Linux and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

OnePlus 3 is practically the perfect Android smartphone

Filed under
Android

The OnePlus 3 is practically perfect, save for expandable storage, waterproofing, fast wireless charging and a QuadHD display. To be honest, I could live without any of these.

OnePlus has really outdone itself and its competitors this year. I dare you to find a better Android phone for $400.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Scality launches single-server open source software for S3-compliant storage

    News this morning from storage vendor Scality that the company is announcing the general availability of its S3 Server Software. The offering is an open source version of Scality's S3 API and allows developers to code to Amazon Web Services' S3 storage API on a local machine.

    Packaged as a Docker container (what else!) the idea is that developers can local build applications that thereafter can be deployed on premises, on AWS or some combination of the above.

  • Scality Announces the S3 Server Open Source Software
  • Nextcloud 9 Available, Enterprise Functionality to be Open Source

    Well ahead of the early July promise, today Nextcloud makes available Nextcloud 9. With this release we also announce to release all enterprise functionality as open source. Building on top of the open source ownCloud core and adding functionality and fixes, this release provides a solid base for users to migrate to. All enterprise functionality users and customers need will be made available over the coming weeks, fully developed in the open and under the AGPL license.

  • Nextcloud 9 Released, All Enterprise Features To Be Opened Up

    Less than two weeks after ownCloud was forked into Nextcloud, the project today did their version 9 release.

  • Open Source SLA Printer Software Slices from the Browser

    Resin-based SLA printers need a different slicing algorithm from “normal” melted-plastic printers. Following their latest hackathon, [Matt Keeter] and [Martin Galese] from Formlabs have polished off an open source slicer, and this one runs in your browser. It’s Javascript, so you can go test it out on their webpage.

    Figuring out whether or not the voxel is inside or outside the model at every layer is harder for SLA printers, which have to take explicit account of the interior “empty” space inside the model. [Matt] and [Martin]’s software calculates this on the fly as the software is slicing. To do this, [Matt] devised a clever algorithm that leverages existing hardware to quickly accumulate the inside-or-out state of voxels during the slicing.

  • Capital One Taps Open-Source, Cloud, Big Data for Advantage in Banking

    Capital One is one of the nation's largest banks. It started as a credit card company, really as a startup in the late 1980s. Its founder, Richard Fairbank, is still its CEO today. Fairbank's idea was to build a better financial services company by using information and data to make better decisions and build better products and services for customers—making Capital One an early "big data" company. The company launched around the notion of an information-based strategy, which in that era was a pretty novel concept.

Walrus gumboot, Canonical eyeballs Juju to charm ‘big software’

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical is the company behind Ubuntu, the Debian-based Linux distribution that many of us know as ‘probably’ (arguably, not necessarily if you’re a purist) the best Linux operating system for a personal PC.

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elementary OS 0.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • elementary OS 0.4 Beta Screenshot Tour
  • elementary OS 0.4 'Loki' Beta now available -- download the popular Linux distro here

    There are a lot of Linux-based desktop operating systems nowadays. Understandably, it can be hard to pick one. Many Linux users end up being distro-jumpers, constantly trying many, yet never settling.

    One popular Linux distro is vying for your attention, hopefully making you feel at home -- no jumping needed. Called elementary OS, it uses an Ubuntu base for stability and software compatibility. The developers put a high value on the user experience -- the interface is both gorgeous and intuitive. Today, the much anticipated 0.4 version -- code-named 'Loki' -- sees Beta release.

Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 brings about serious improvement to the platform

Filed under
Ubuntu

Aside from the amazing wireless convergence (and it truly is game-changing), the most important aspect of an update is simple...did the update improve the experience? After all, every developer wants their platform to always be improving. So, what's the end result with OTA-11? To the casual user, it might seem like the latest Ubuntu Touch image really didn't do much. However, the truth is much more telling than that. With the release of OTA-11, Ubuntu Touch now runs much smoother; apps are faster to open, animations are cleaner, and there's much less wait involved with regular usage. That doesn't mean Ubuntu Touch has been perfected. It's still not on par with the speed and efficiency of either Android or iOS, but it has made amazing leaps forward with OTA-11 and is closing the gap faster than anyone would have deemed possible.

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KDE Plasma 5.6.5 Is the Last in the Series, KDE Plasma 5.7 Coming July 5

Filed under
KDE

Today, June 14, 2016, KDE has released the fifth and last maintenance update of the KDE Plasma 5.6 desktop environment series.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

BunsenLabs Linux

Filed under
Reviews

When I first started using BunsenLabs Linux I did not enjoy the experience. At first, it felt like installing Debian with a depressing theme and fewer features. The initial installation and configuration steps felt overly long and complicated. The Openbox environment lacked the features of fuller desktop environments while, at the same time, offering unwanted distractions such as Conky and extra virtual desktops. It would be fair to say the first two or three hours with Bunsen were unpleasant for me.

However, there was definitely a turning point during my trial. Around the start of the second day -- once I had a more colourful theme in place, the Conky packages had been banished and I had got into the habit of installing software I wanted from the application menu -- there was a point where I began to enjoy Bunsen. The distribution's hardware and multimedia support were top notch, performance and the interface's responsiveness were excellent and the applications available all worked properly. Openbox has enough configuration tools to make it flexible without being overwhelming. What really sold me on the distribution though was the way Openbox stayed out of my way, a feature I feel Debian's default desktop does not offer.

At the end of my trial, I still had some mixed feelings. As much as Bunsen grew on me, I couldn't help but feel the experience felt very much like installing Debian and adding the Openbox window manager as a session option. While Bunsen takes care of that step for us, it also adds several extra steps during the initial configuration that made me feel like going with plain Debian and installing Openbox might have been faster and easier.

In the end, I did grow to like Bunsen with its clean, fast user interface. I like the distribution's tweaks to Debian such as adding sudo and providing application menu installers. I think the initial welcome script should probably either be automated or ask all its questions up front and then go to work in the background. It took a while for me to get the interface looking the way I wanted it to and less like the inside of a mine shaft, but once I did the distribution provided a good set of default applications and desktop functionality.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • After a slow start, Dell turns up the dial on Steam Machines

    Dell had high hopes for the Alienware Steam Machine after its delayed release last year, but it did not become as popular as its twin, Alienware Alpha, a Windows-based PC gaming console.

    The viability of Steam Machines, a family of Linux-based PC gaming consoles with SteamOS, has been questioned, but Dell isn't giving up yet. With better hardware and an expanding list of gaming titles, Dell is hoping that interest in Alienware Steam Machines will grow.

  • Dell set to introduce beefed up Steam Machines
  • Platformer On Rusty Trails released on Steam for Linux, some thoughts

    I love the first level of Tiny & Big. It's a massive sandbox 3D platformer area where you get to use tools to slice through and toss around the terrain in order to explore and find secrets. The game quickly gets more action oriented though, and I unfortunately lost interest long before I finished it. Love, Hate & the other ones also looked interesting to me, and I bought and played a couple of the first areas of it. It's a puzzler with interesting mechanics, but it didn't really hook me, and I never wound up playing much of it. That first level of Tiny & Big though had a big impact on me, and I wish I could play a whole game of just that. And it's the creativity and sense of design that went into that one level that made me eager to try the new game the developers have been cooking up since I first heard about it last year.

  • MAV, a custom mech combat game will come to Linux, looks great

Git 2.9

Filed under
Development
Software

Open Source Wins: Now What?

Filed under
OSS

"I've had this conversation with some of my peers in the industry who have also been involved with free and open source for a very long time, where we look at each other and say, 'Oh my god, we won! Now what?'" Garbee added. "It's immensely satisfying, but the stress level does go up a bit. We've convinced everybody that these are good ideas. We've shown the world that you can run successful businesses around this model of collaborative development. HPE is making what amount to company sized bets on doing things this way. We definitely have to deliver. We have to make it all work."

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Qualcomm reveals wireless oriented connected car platform

Filed under
Android
Linux

Qualcomm announced a pre-integrated suite of automotive hardware components including LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, tuners, CAN, and VSX technology.

In conjunction with last week’s TU-Automotive Detroit conference, Qualcomm unveiled a Connected Car Reference Platform that offers a pre-integrated lineup of the chipmaker’s wireless and telematics solutions. The reference platform even includes DSRC for enabling V2X (vehicle to vehicle or vehicle to infrastructure) technology.

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TrustZone “TEE” tech ported to Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Linux

The Sequitur Labs port of Linaro’s OP-TEE environment to the Raspberry Pi 3 aims to encourage prototyping of ARM TrustZone hardware security on IoT devices.

Linaro’s three-year old OP-TEE open source port of the TEE (Trusted Execution Environment) for ARM TrustZone security is now available on the lowest-cost platform yet: the Raspberry Pi 3. Sequitur Labs has worked with the ARM-backed not-for-profit development firm Linaro and its Linaro Security Working Group (SWG) to provide the technology to Pi 3 developers so they can learn about ARM TrustZone and begin developing trusted applications for it.

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Linux Kernel 3.10.102 LTS Is Out with x86 and EXT4 Improvements, Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

On June 13, Linux kernel developer Willy Tarreau announced the immediate availability for download of the one-hundred-second maintenance release for the Linux 3.10 LTS series.

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GTK versioning and distributions

Filed under
GNOME

Historically, GTK has aimed to keep compatible within a major version, where major versions are rather far apart (GTK 1 in 1998, GTK 2 in 2002, GTK 3 in 2011, GTK 4 somewhere in the future). Meanwhile, fixing bugs, improving performance and introducing new features sometimes results in major changes behind the scenes. In an ideal world, these behind-the-scenes changes would never break applications; however, the world isn't ideal. (The Debian analogy here is that as much as we aspire to having the upgrade from one stable release to the next not break anything at all, I don't think we've ever achieved that in practice - we still ask users to read the release notes, even though ideally that wouldn't be necessary.)

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