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Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 9:21am
Story A short critique of Stallmanism Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 8:39am
Story Google may unveil merged Android and Chrome OS, dubbed Andromeda, at event Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 12:07am
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:58pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:57pm
Story Lenovo G50 & CentOS 7.2 MATE - Fairly solid Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:37pm
Story digiKam 5.2.0 is published... Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:25pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:03pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 8:50pm
Story Libreboot Drama Continues, GNU Might Keep The Project Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 8:46pm

Slackware Updates

Filed under
Slack
  • [Slackware] Sep ’16 Security fixes for Adobe Flash
  • Adobe is making a u-turn by resurrecting Flash Player for Linux
  • LibreOffice 5.2.1 for slackware-current

    The upgraded boost package in slackware-current last week had broken LibreOffice’s “localc” program. Which is typical because I compile LibreOffice with a “–without-system-boost” flag. Apparently a dependency on the system’s boost libraries gets added nevertheless. Patches to cure this behaviour are very welcome!

    Thus it became necessary to compile new packages for slackware-current. Co-incidentally there was also a new LibreOffice release last week: a minor upgrade to the 5.2 series, check out the announcement on the Document Foundation blog . And note their designation of this release: “LibreOffice 5.2.1, targeted at technology enthusiasts, early adopters and power users, provides a number of fixes over the major release announced in August. For all other users and enterprise deployments, TDF suggests LibreOffice 5.1.5 “.

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Fixing packages for broken Gtk3

    As mentioned on sunweaver’s blog Debian’s GTK-3+ v3.21 breaks Debian MATE 1.14, Gtk3 is breaking apps all around. But not only Mate, probably many other apps are broken, too, in particular Nemo (the file manager of Cinnamon desktop) has redraw issues (bug 836908), and regular crashes (bug 835043).

  • Statistics to Choose a Debian Package to Help

    In the last week I played a bit with UDD (Ultimate Debian Database). After some experiments I did a script to generate a daily report about source packages in Debian. This report is useful to choose a package that needs help.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 Released

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A WebKit Update for Ubuntu

    I’m pleased to learn that Ubuntu has just updated WebKitGTK+ from 2.10.9 to 2.12.5 in Ubuntu 16.04. To my knowledge, this is the first time Ubuntu has released a major WebKit update. It includes fixes for 16 security vulnerabilities detailed in WSA-2016-0004 and WSA-2016-0005.

  • Nextcloud Box – a private cloud and IoT solution for home users
  • Nextcloud Box is an $80 private cloud server kit with 1TB of storage (just add a Raspberry Pi)

    Cloud storage services like Dropbox or Google Drive make it easy to store your files online and access them across a range of devices. But if you don’t want to give Google or Dropbox that much control over your data, you can also set up your own “private cloud” by installing OwnCloud or Nextcloud software on a server.

  • Download deepin 15.3 GNU/Linux

    Here are deepin 15.3 official download links plus some mirrors. deepin 15.3 is released recently at 13 September 2016. deepin 15.3 is released for 32 and 64 bit desktop computers. And you can read about how to verify ISO file checksums at the end of article. We hope this article helps you a lot.

Chrome OS/Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Google
  • Chrome OS gets cryptographically verified enterprise device management

    Companies will now be able to cryptographically validate the identity of Chrome OS devices connecting to their networks and verify that those devices conform to their security policies.

    On Thursday, Google announced a new feature and administration API called Verified Access. The API relies on digital certificates stored in the hardware-based Trusted Platform Modules (TPMs) present in every Chrome OS device to certify that the security state of those devices has not been altered.

    Many organizations have access controls in place to ensure that only authorized users are allowed to access sensitive resources and they do so from enterprise-managed devices conforming to their security policies.

    Most of these checks are currently performed on devices using heuristic methods, but the results can be faked if the devices' OSes are compromised. With Verified Access, Google plans to make it impossible to fake those results in Chromebooks.

  • Samsung's high-end Android clamshell appears in live images

    Earlier this month, the Samsung Galaxy Folder 2 was unveiled. This is the sequel to the manufacturer's entry-level Android flavored clamshell. Samsung is apparently prepping another Android powered clamshell for power users who want a smartphone with this form factor. Today, live images of the SM-W2017 have surfaced. The phone carries the code name 'Veyron."

    The device carries a 4.2-inch screen with a 1080 x 1920 resolution. Driving the phone is a Snapdragon 820 chipset, which features a quad-core CPU and the Adreno 530 GPU. 4GB of RAM is inside along with 64GB of native storage. A 12MP rear-facing camera offers PDAF laser focusing, and the 5MP front-facing camera snaps selfies and handles video chats. Keeping the lights on is a 2000mAh battery.

  • OpenWeatherMapProvider for CyanogenMod 13
  • Sony Xperia C4 Now Getting Android 6.0 Marshmallow Update
  • Chrome beta for Android plays web videos in the background
  • Note 7 owner sues Samsung, saying phone exploded in his pocket
  • President of Samsung US apologizes for Note7 recall

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Closed Source Engines are a Big Risk

    The two of us have spent our whole careers writing C++ and making engines (in fact, we'd both worked at Unity building the engine), so we thought we'd take a nice vacation from memory management and C++ and pick that one first.

    [...]

    It's the black box nature that's most troublesome to me. With source code, it's still a huge codebase that's hard to parse and has plenty of problems, but at least I can hunt down my bugs.

  • Can Carriers Open Source New Biz Processes?

    One of the more telling moments of our NFV & Carrier SDN event here this week actually happened before the conference itself had formally started, at an Oracle-sponsored breakfast session Tuesday morning.

    Appearing on a panel with my Heavy Reading colleague Jim Hodges were Bill Walker, director of network architecture at CenturyLink Inc. (NYSE: CTL), and Paul Boland, managing partner, solutions at Verizon Enterprise Solutions . Sitting in the front row of the session was Tom Anschutz, distinguished member of technical staff at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) Services Inc., who would later deliver a keynote.

  • Getting ready for IBM Edge 2016
  • LibreOffice Conference 2016 – Brno, Czech Republic
  • What's next for Apache OpenOffice

    Concerns about the viability of the Apache OpenOffice (AOO) project are not new; they had been in the air for a while by the time LWN looked at the project's development activity in early 2015. Since then, though, the worries have grown more pronounced, especially after AOO's recent failure to produce a release with an important security fix nearly one year after being notified of the vulnerability. The result is an internal discussion on whether the project should be "retired," or whether it will find a way to turn its fortunes around.

    The current chair of the AOO project management committee (PMC) is Dennis Hamilton, whose term is set to end shortly. He has been concerned about the sustainability of the project for some time (see this message from one year ago, for example), a concern sharpened by the routine requirement that he report to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) board on the project's status. The board, seemingly, had asked few questions about the status of AOO until recently, when the handling of CVE-2016-1513 (or the lack thereof) came to its attention. Now the board is apparently asking some sharp questions indeed and requiring monthly (rather than every three months as usual) reports from the project. "Retirement" of the project, it seems, has been explicitly mentioned as a possibility.

  • Microsoft And Linux — A Song Of Mice And Ire
  • GraphHopper Provides Open Source Routing Solutions and Routing as a Service
  • Two Small Fundraisings – on gspell and LaTeXila

    I have a half-time job, and I care about Free Software. So the natural thing to do for me is to find ways to be funded for the contributions I do.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Layout APIs don’t have to be terrible – lessons from Bokeh
  • Change in PHP 7 that may break some of Ubuntu servers on update

    Seems harmless. Administrators will see errors on test installation and fix old configs. But here comes one nasty trait of php-fpm: it refuses to start with incorrect php-fpm.conf, but it will start with incorrect php.ini, ignoring all settings there just rolling back to default values. Error is not written to php-fpm log. It can be spotted in console, but service start script hides that messages.

  • Open source C++ execution trace framework

    At froglogic, we’re big fans of open source software. A large part of our engineering (and management!) staff contributed or contributes to open source projects, and everyone visiting our offices for a job interview certainly gets a big +1 in case she can show off some open source work! We also use a lot of open source software for our daily work, ranging from obvious projects like Git or the Linux kernel to individual libraries serving very specific purposes; the Acknowledgements Chapter of the Squish manual gives an impression of how tall the giants are upon whose shoulders we’re standing.

    Over the last couple of years we contributed back various bug fixes and improvements to different projects we’re using, but we’d like to step things up a little bit. Hence, we now open-sourced an internally developed C++ framework called ‘TraceTool’ and made it available under the LGPL v3 license on our GitHub account:

  • Stripped and ready to go: Enterprise Java MicroProfile lands

    The project for a lightweight and modular enterprise Java suited to microservices has hit general release.

    MicroProfile 1.0 has now hit general availability, just over two months after the project was unveiled by representatives of IBM, Red Hat, Tomitribe, Payara and the London Java Community on June 27.

    A formal announcement is expected at Oracle’s annual JavaOne conference in San Francisco next week.

  • Untangling character sets and Unicode blocks

Emacs 25.1 released

Filed under
GNU

Version 25.1 of the Emacs text editor is now available.

Read more

Libreboot Screwup and FSF

Filed under
OSS
  • Libreboot Screwup - 18 Sept 2016

    As one of the main "contributors" to the Libreboot project, I was contracted to work on two chipsets by Minifree.

    Given the recent kerfuffle, and in spite of my vested interest in wanting to continue being paid to continue this important work, I find it necessary to spell out a couple of facts I find important about the libreboot project and the libreboot community:

    1) I have recently noticed that Leah Rowe is the only person who has git commit access to the website, libreboot.org, and also the only person who has git commit access to the codebase, which has only become a problem recently.

    2) The codebase is a deblobbed coreboot repository, with patches from libreboot contributors (but committed by Leah), and a bunch of install scripts for ease of use.

    3) We (the contributors) are not consulted about any of the views expressed on the libreboot.org website when they are hastily published by Leah.

  • Free Software Foundation statement on 2016-09-16

    This morning, an open email circulated in which the author said that the Free Software Foundation ended a relationship with one of our employees for discriminatory reasons.

    Although it is our usual policy not to comment publicly on internal personnel matters for privacy reasons, we felt it necessary to state unequivocally that the allegations made in that email are untrue.

    It is part of our job to celebrate and improve the diversity of the free software world. We have strong anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies to help provide a safe and supportive working environment. We uphold a safe space policy at all FSF events, and we provide scholarships to help people of different identities, and from different regions, attend. The FSF's mission is to defend the freedom of all computer users.

  • GNU Autoconf Noteworthy changes in release 2016.09.16

New release: Semi-Automatic OS v. 5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

I have released a new version of the Semi-Automatic OS v. 5, a free virtual machine based on Debian Linux, for the land cover classification of remote sensing images. It includes the Semi-Automatic Classification Plugin (SCP) and QGIS, already configured along with all the required dependencies (OGR, GDAL, Numpy, SciPy, and Matplotlib).

Read more

Igor Ljubuncic Explores CentOS

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The hunt for the perfect CentOS theme

    Here we are, at the end of this article. It serve no purpose really. But it shows that CentOS can be as relevant, stylish, slick, and modern as any other distro. Which is even more amazing when you take into account its age, its relative conservatism, the fact it will be supported for another bunch of years, and that it still competes well and true with all the latest and greatest home distros, with infinitely more stability.

    Just remember this is a server distribution, and its purpose in life is to run code and make money and whatnot. It's not there to entertain your laptop, and yet it can do that pretty well. Everything you need Linux wise is there. Including some fireworks. Maybe this article serves no higher goal, but perhaps you are ever so slightly delighted and entertained. If you have any suggestions on how CentOS can be made even more elegant, please drop me a nice and friendly line. Meanwhile, I'm off to do some more CentOS testing, maybe even on the G50 box. Stay tuned.

    Oh, one more thing. We have only just begun. If you think this is the sum of all pretty, then I have a few surprises up my sleeve - wizard's sleeve, Borat style. You will need to exercise patience for a few more days or weeks, and then I shall reveal unto you. But it will be good. I guarantee that. Now, for real, stay tuned.

  • How to tame and pimp Xfce on CentOS 7

    There you go. This is the ordeal that I had to undergo to finally have a fully working Xfce desktop in CentOS 7.2, loaded with all the right goodies, like software, codecs, and support for my gadgets, plus the necessary aesthetics. Most people take this kind of work for granted, and expect results from distro developers and distributions, which is perfectly legitimate. So if you find this unnecessary, I totally agree with you.

    Except, CentOS is a server distro, and it brings its special perks to the desktop, for the price of some extra work on your behalf. Moreover, you won't need to be repeating yourself, and you won't be plagued with regressions, so your effort won't be wasted. In the end, it comes down to ROI. For me, the technical bits culminate in some expected look & feel tweakology, a new menu, sound and audio changes, and a few other bits and pieces. Much simpler and shorter after you've done this once and know what to expect. Perhaps then, this little exercise won't be an ordeal for you, but a pleasurable little escapade and a long-term investment. I hope you enjoy it.

GNU/Linux Review: elementary OS 0.4 Loki

Filed under
Reviews

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" has released at 9 September 2016. I tried elementary OS Loki for 6 days and now it's time for the review. I wrote this review for beginners and first timers in GNU/Linux, especially in elementary OS. I cover shortly 18 aspects such as shortcut keys, memory usage, audio/video support, desktop experiences, and also elementary OS Loki default software applications. As overall (mentioned below), it's really exciting and comfortable experience for me to review and use elementary OS now, in Loki release. I hope this review is really helpful to you.

Read more

Also:

Samsung forgets about Chrome OS, advertises Chromebooks ‘Powered by Android’

Filed under
Android

Since Chromebooks first hit the scene, Samsung has had options available. The Samsung Series 3 Chromebook was one of the most popular Chromebooks ever, but in the time since Samsung’s Chromebooks have faded into the background a bit with the focus shifted to options from HP, ASUS, Acer, and many others. With Android apps on the horizon, it seems that Samsung is finally pushing its Chromebook lineup yet again, but it might be doing that in the wrong way…

Read more

Slackel 6.0.7 "Live Openbox"

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Slackel Live Installer (SLI) supports installation on different filesystems (btrfs, ext2, ext3, ext4, jfs, reiserfs, xfs). You can use a different partition for /home. You can find and add Windows partitions in grub.cfg. Note that if you use eLilo as your bootloader, you will not be able to boot Windows partitions.

Read more

Raspberry Pi With Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux gave me one of my best gaming experiences yet

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

A few times in your life, you have a life changing experience. Maybe it’s getting married, having your first child, or finishing your college degree.

Well, I just had a life changing experience. And it was because of a video game. Not just a video game, but a video game that I played on Linux.

As I am sure many of you are aware, Linux gets the unfortunate notoriety of being a poor operating system for games (this seems to be changing in the public's eyes). Sure, we do have less games than other platforms, but that certainly doesn’t mean the games themselves are of poor quality.

I was reminded of this when I completed the recently ported game to Linux, ‘Life is Strange’ [Official Site, Steam]. Developed by Dontnod Entertainment, and ported to Linux by the awesome folks at Feral interactive. With the combined work on developing the game itself from Dontnod, and the wonderful port by Feral, I have just had one of my best gaming experiences ever. And it was all done on Linux.

Read more

Also: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Heads to Linux and Mac, Courtesy Feral Interactive

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • BFS Scheduler Gets "Substantial Updates" For Linux 4.7

    Con Kolivas announced this week BFS 497, a major new release of his scheduler that's now fitted for the Linux 4.7 kernel.

    Con commented about the Brain Fuck Scheduler changes for Linux 4.7, "Thanks(?) to the massive changes to the mainline kernel I'd been forced to rewrite significant components of BFS to work properly with them, specifically the cpu frequency governors. At the same time I've had quite a bit of energy and enthusiasm for working on BFS in a way I haven't had in a long time. As a result, this updated version not only addresses the remaining cgroup stub patch bug (mentioned on the previous announcement) but implements further improvements and clean ups to go with those improvements."

  • RadeonSI Now Uses The HSA ABI For Some Compute Shaders
  • X.Org Server 1.19 Is Ready To Freeze, Almost 600 Changes

Software Freedom Day Coverage

Filed under
OSS

Linux Began Its Invisible Conquest of Computing 25 Years Ago

Filed under
Linux

On September 17, 1991, a volunteer administrator for the FTP server shared by Finland’s universities uploaded the kernel of a new, open-source operating system. The administrator, Ari Lemmke, did so on behalf of his friend, a computer science student at the University of Helsinki. There was just one small problem: Lemmke didn’t like Freax, the name his friend had given the operating system. “Freax” was meant as a portmanteau of “free,” “freak,” and the operating system’s spiritual ancestor, Unix, but this didn’t sway Lemmke. Instead, he renamed Freax after its inventor, Linus Torvalds. The operating system went out into the world as Linux, and the rest is history.

It’s now exactly a quarter-century later, and Linux has won. Oh sure, it’s still a relative rarity on personal computers. Data from earlier this year shows that just 1.8 percent of desktop computers use Linux. Although Microsoft Windows crushes Linux with 89.7 percent of all desktops, Linux really isn’t that far away from the 8.5 percent of desktop computers running Mac OS. Sure, Linux is the third operating system when it comes to computers, but it’s more down to Apple’s branding than anything else that we think of this as a two-system race in the first place.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Carla Schroder: On Farming and Linux

    Carla Schroder sometimes describes herself as an “Ace Linux guru,” which is as good a way to tell you who she is as any — at least in the Linux context. She’s written so much, in so many places, that it’s easier to give you a single Google link to her work than to list a whole stack of articles, plus three O’Reilly books. The single article I’ll point you to on its own is one Schroder wrote for Opensource.com in July, 2016, titled I’ve Been Linuxing Since Before You Were Born.

    But the main thing (the “takeaway,” marketing people would say) about this interview is that it shows you how a persistent person can teach herself Linux and build a pretty good career working with it and writing about it — and still have time to do a little farming on the side.

  • And another live upgrade – 13.2 -> Leap 42.1
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/37
  • Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’ Linux Distro Released, Based On Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 ‘Jessie’

    Q4OS is a Debian-based open source Linux distribution that comes with Trinity desktop environment, which is forked from KDE. The latest release, Q4OS 1.6.2 ‘Orion’, improves the previous version and fixes the bugs reported by users. The existing Q4OS 1.6 or 1.6.1 OS users are advised to update their systems to the latest version.

  • Deepin 15.3 OS Released — A Polished and Beautiful Linux Distro That You’ll Love
  • The Router rumble: Ars DIY build faces better tests, tougher competition

    Since the original Homebrew router is in service for my office now, I built a new one. (Actually, I've built quite a few new ones since then—they've proven pretty popular.) The Homebrew 2.0 looks a lot more serious than its spunky little disco-colored predecessor; it's got a smaller form factor, rugged heavy heat dissipation fins along the top, and four Intel gigabit LAN interfaces across the front. It also has a newer processor: a J1900 Bay Trail Celeron, as opposed to the original Homebrew's 1037u Ivy Bridge Celeron. The new CPU is a mixed bag. It's got twice the cores, but it's a bit slower per thread. For most routing jobs, this gives the older Ivy Bridge CPU a slight advantage, but overall it's a wash. Either version has proven to be more than enough muscle to do the job.

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Blender 2.78 Open-Source 3D Graphics Software Released with Spherical Stereo VR

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OSS Leftovers

  • Tools for writing the next best seller
    I am using bibisco in conjunction with LibreOffice on my Ubuntu 16.04 Asus laptop that I converted over from Windows 7 to develop my characters, scenes, and plot. I tried Manuskript, but find that I like bibisco better, although the results are similar. For one, it gives helpful prompts.
  • GNOME Calendar App to Feature a New Sidebar, Week View & Attendees in GNOME 3.24
    GNOME developer Georges Stavracas wrote an in-depth blog post the other day to inform the GNOME, Linux, and Open Source communities about the upcoming improvements and new features coming to the GNOME Calendar apps. Now that some of us are already enjoying the recently released GNOME 3.22 desktop environment, the GNOME developers are hard at work to improve the GNOME apps and core components by either adding new exciting features and technologies or improving existing ones.
  • PHP version 5.6.27RC1 and 7.0.12RC1
  • Kubernetes Arrives in New Flavors
    Kubernetes has taken center stage in recent days, and, as we’ve been noting in recent posts, the open source container cluster manager is heading in new directions. Google has just announced the release of Kubernetes 1.4, which makes the tool much easier to install. Meanwhile, Canonical has now launched its own distribution of Kubernetes, with enterprise support, across a range of public clouds and private infrastructure. It's Kubernetes at the core, but features a number of extra bells and whistles.
  • 2016 Women in Open Source Award Winners
    We hope you enjoy and are inspired by this short video celebrating Preeti Murthy and Jessica McKellar, the winners of this year’s Red Hat Women in Open Source Awards.
  • Tech, talent and tools: The secret to monetizing open-source
    “In California during the gold rush, you didn’t make money digging for gold; you made money selling shovels,” said Mehta. A fitting metaphor for the idea that investing in talent and tools, especially tools, is how to turn a profit. The actual data, databases, algorithms and so on would be open source. Money would come from the tools to use that technology to benefit specific areas, such as automation of healthcare. And healthcare is a good place to start. “Big Data is all about making life cheaper, better. … If we forget about how to solve problems for humans, we’ve lost. We want to be known for enriching life,” said Mehta.
  • Changing the way we design for the web
    On the one hand, open source should mean lower cost of entry for people from poorer communities (like me, growing up). But on the other, I feel it is hard to contribute when under- or unemployed. I had a grant to work on the Web Animations API documentation, but I can't do as much as I'd like with other animation features (motion paths, advanced timing functions) because I need to spend a lot of time working on my own business, getting paid. Essentially this leads to an awkward model where the only contributors are employed programmers—and when it comes to open source animation or design APIs, platforms, etc, this lack of user input really starts to show. Or, the only products with thriving open source development teams are those that have financially lucrative futures, turning the open source software (OSS) model into a capitalist one.
  • Leaders in Data Management and Open Source Innovation to Gather for Postgres Vision 2016
  • CloudReady by neverware
    I thought I would put together a quick “installation” review of a product called CloudReady by neverware. What is CloudReady? CloudReady is basically a project to bring Chromium OS to those who would like to convert traditional laptops into Chromebook-like devices. I stumbled on them several months ago and finally decided to see how hard it was to install Chromium OS and how functional it actually was as a Chromebook-like device. I have a few low end (netbook-like) devices and I have been trying to figure out how I could make them functional for my boys, I thought this might be the solution.
  • Mozilla tells Firefox OS devs to fork off if they want to chase open web apps vision
    The Mozilla Foundation's Firefox development team has decided enough is enough and will stop supporting Windows XP and Vista in March 2017 and also bin Firefox OS. The OS first. In this post Mozillans Ari Jaaksi and David Bryant, respectively the head of connected devices and veep for platform engineering, write that “By the end of 2015 Mozilla leadership had come to the conclusion that our then Firefox OS initiative of shipping phones with commercial partners would not bring Mozilla the returns we sought.” That decision means that “as of the end of July 2016 have stopped all commercial development on Firefox OS.”
  • Cloudera Delivers Release Built on Apache Spark 2.0, and Advances Kudu
    Cloudera, focused on Apache Hadoop and other open source technologies,has announced its release built on the Apache Spark 2.0 (Beta), with enhancements to the API experience, performance improvements, and enhanced machine learning capabilities. The company is also working with the community to continue developing Apache Kudu 1.0, recently released by the Apache Software Foundation, which we covered here. Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. Taken together, Cloudera's new tools are giving it more diverse kinds of presence on the Big Data scene. Cloudera claims it was the first Hadoop big data analytics vendor to deliver a commercially supported version of Spark, and has participated actively in the open source community to enhance Spark for the enterprise through its One Platform Initiative. "With Spark 2.0, organizations are better able to take advantage of streaming data, develop richer machine learning models, and deploy them in real time, enabling more workloads to go into production," the company reports.
  • Cloudera Delivers Enterprise-Grade Real-Time Streaming and Machine Learning with Apache Spark 2.0 and Drives Community Innovation with Apache Kudu 1.0
  • INSIDE Secure and Marvell Deliver Open Source Open Data Plane Security VPN Solution [Ed: “open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API” sounds like nonsensical openwashing]
    INSIDE Secure (Paris:INSD), at the heart of security solutions for mobile and connected devices and network equipment, today announced the Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution, a collaboration that provides open source Open Data Plane (ODP) security API support on Marvell’s ARMADA® 8K and ARMADA 7K System-on-Chip (SoC) families with embedded INSIDE Secure Security Protocol Accelerator IP technology. The Marvell-INSIDE Secure solution provides customers with an easy and efficient way to secure their high-speed networking applications with access to all of the ARM ecosystem’s software support.
  • GE, Bosch Combine Resources to Bolster IoT
  • OpenBSD 6.0 Limited Edition CD set (signed by developers)
    Five OpenBSD 6.0 CD-ROM copies were signed by 40 developers during the g2k16 Hackathon in Cambridge, UK. Those copies are being auctioned sequentially on ebay. All proceeds will be donated to the OpenBSD Foundation to support and further the development of free software based on the OpenBSD operating system.
  • Friday Working together for Free Software Directory IRC meetup: September 30th
  • Machine Learning with Python
    I first heard the term “machine learning” a few years ago, and to be honest, I basically ignored it that time. I knew that it was a powerful technique, and I knew that it was in vogue, but I didn’t know what it really was— what problems it was designed to solve, how it solved them and how it related to the other sorts of issues I was working on in my professional (consulting) life and in my graduate-school research. But in the past few years, machine learning has become a topic that most will avoid at their professional peril. Despite the scary-sounding name, the ideas behind machine learning aren’t that difficult to understand. Moreover, a great deal of open-source software makes it possible for anyone to use machine learning in their own work or research. I don’t think it’s an overstatement to say that machine learning already is having a huge impact on the computer industry and on our day-to-day lives.