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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Defense Department (Re)Launches Open Source Software Portal Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 5:15am
Story Linux Weather Forecast Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:53pm
Story 5 Open Source Technology Trends for 2018 Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:50pm
Story Better Know a Blogger: SJVN on Linux, Microsoft, space roadsters, and more Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:48pm
Story Real-time Linux based automation controller supports up to 16 I/O modules Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:29pm
Story Devices/Embedded: Nintendo Switch, Advantech, Renesa, PocketBeagle Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:04pm
Story Patent Troll MPEG LA Wants People to Stay With MPEG Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:02pm
Story Graphics: glTF 2, Graphics Compiler, DRI3 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:52pm
Story KDE: Plasma and Solus 4 Updates, Amarok Comes to Plasma 5 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:48pm

Games: Twine and SugarCube, Unearned Bounty and More

Filed under
Gaming

Hands-On: Kali Linux 2018.1 on the Raspberry Pi Zero W

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Security

The installation image is actually on the Offensive Security Kali Linux ARM Images page, so don't get confused if you go to the normal Kali Linux Downloads page and don't see it. There is a link to the ARM images near the bottom of that page.

As with most Raspberry Pi installation images, the download is a compressed (xz) snapshot, not an ISO image.

Read more

Nintendo Switch Hacked to Run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Hacking group fail0verflow has discovered a vulnerability in Nintendo Switch that allows the installation of Linux, basically opening the door to something that the parent company hoped it’d never come true: pirated games.

In a post on Twitter earlier this week, fail0verflow revealed that Nintendo Switch comes with a bug that cannot be fixed with firmware updates and which can be abused at any moment to install Linux.

Read more

PocketSprite With GNUBoy

Filed under
GNU
Hardware
Gaming
  • You Can Now Buy Keychain Game Boys & 2018 Never Looked So Retro
  • PocketSprite Tiny Handheld Game System Launches From $45

    PocketSprite is a new tiny retro handheld games system, which has this week launched via the Crowd Supply crowdfunding website, and has already nearly raised its required $20,000 pledge goal. Thanks to over 380 backers with still 41 days remaining on its campaign. The tiny keychain PocketSprite games console comes pre-loaded with two emulators in the form of the GNUBoy and SMS Plus. Allowing you to play “every single game” from the Nintendo Game Boy, Nintendo Game Boy Color, Sega Master System and Sega Game Gear consoles.

  • Retrogaming Dream Device PocketSprite is Almost Funded

    These days, dipping into the nostalgia pool is a surefire way to grab the attention of retro preservationists and lovers of geeky gadgetry. Team Pocket’s chibi-sized emulator is a case in point. The PocketSprite, a diminutive, open source emulation device, accomodates your old-school cravings with a lineup of Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Game Gear and Sega Master System Games within a colour OLED display. It doesn’t make sacrifices on framerates, either; Sonic runs loop de loops at 60+ FPS in PocketSprite’s 5:4 aspect ratio.

  • The keychain Game Boy is now a real crowdfunded gadget, and I want one

    Interestingly, the PocketSprite isn’t the only pocket-sized GameBoy out there. There’s a slew of competitors, including the PocketStar (which is also crowdfunding on Kickstarter), the Arduino-based 8-bit Arduboy, and the NES-copying BittBoy Mini handheld.

  • PocketSprite is a tiny open source ‘Game Boy’ for retro games

    Unlike the “pocket games” of old, which were preloaded with generic, unchangeable random games, PocketSprite lets users upload their own preferred content.

Digital India can only grow via Open Source

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Initiative is celebrating its 20th Anniversary in 2018 as the term was coined in a session held on February 3rd, 1998 in Palo Alto, California.

In the last 20 years, the initiative has come a long way. Acknowledging the importance of'open source initiative' which continues to play in our lives and to enable open discussion on the challenges that exist and to work out strategies to iron them out, Bharat Exhibition organised an 'Open Source Summit 2018' in New Delhi on February 08, 2018.

Read more

Zerodium offers $45000 for Linux zero-day vulnerabilities

Filed under
Linux
Security

Zerodium is offering $45,000 to hackers willing to privately report zero-day vulnerabilities in the Linux operating system.

On Thursday, the private exploit acquisition program announced the new addition to its bounties on Twitter. Until 31 March, Zerodium is willing to offer increased payouts of up to $45,000 for local privilege escalation (LPE) exploits.

The zero-day, unreported vulnerabilities, should work with default installations of Linux such as the popular Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and Fedora builds.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2017 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

    The polls are closed and the results are in. We once again had some extremely close races and the large number of new categories this year certainly kept things interesting. Congratulations to each and every nominee.

  •  

  • MATE 1.20 Released
  • Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

    This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

    A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

    This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

Tizen TV and Tizen Software

Filed under
Linux

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

OSS Events and More Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Percona Announces Tutorial Schedule for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • FSFE Assembly at 34C3: Wir taten was

    In December 2017, the Chaos Communication Congress moved for the first time onto the Messegelände Leipzig. The FSFE came along and as in recent years, our assembly attracted a lot of visitors. Together with EDRi, for the first time we have been setting up a cluster called “Rights & Freedoms” with our own stage for multiple sessions. Although there have been some organisational issues, this Cluster was a big success and during three days, it has been visited by thousands of people.

    I am happy to see the FSFE assembly again growing every year and having the possibility to bring our message of Software Freedom to the people at the Chaos Communication Congress. The CCC is Germany’s biggest annual meetup of hackers and political activists and is “considered one of the largest events of this kind, alongside the DEF CON in Las Vegas” (wikipedia).

  • a2k18 Hackathon preview: Syncookies coming to PF

    One eagerly anticipated item is the arrival of TCP syncookies (read: another important tool in your anti-DDoS toolset) in PF. Henning Brauer (henning@) added the code in a series of commits on February 6th, 2018, with this one containing the explanation

  • design notes on inline caches in guile

    Next, there are the arithmetic operators: addition, multiplication, and so on. Scheme's arithmetic is indeed polymorphic; the addition operator + can add any number of complex numbers, with a distinction between exact and inexact values. On a representation level, Guile has fixnums (small exact integers, no heap allocation), bignums (arbitrary-precision heap-allocated exact integers), fractions (exact ratios between integers), flonums (heap-allocated double-precision floating point numbers), and compnums (inexact complex numbers, internally a pair of doubles). Also in Guile, arithmetic operators are a "primitive generics", meaning that they can be extended to operate on new types at runtime via GOOPS.

  • The State of OpenJDK In Early 2018

    Oracle's Mark Reinhold spoke at last weekend's FOSDEM conference about the state of OpenJDK for open-source Java.

    Reinhold's presentation covered the bumpy OpenJDK 9 release and then a look ahead to their next six-month release cadence for future OpenJDK releases. He sought to relieve some who feared more frequent breakage and about the handling of new features/functionality in Java and more. Long story short, Oracle hopes for a smooth transition.

  • LinkedIn open-sources Dynamometer for Hadoop performance testing at scale [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing its surveillance (spying on businesses)]
  • Open Source Services Market Worth 32.95 Billion USD by 2022

Security: Data Breaches, Apple, and DRM Threats

Filed under
Security
  • Data breach law: primary concern is information security, says expert

    The primary concern for businesses after the Australian data breach law takes effect on 22 February will be information security, as without that in place, it will not be possible to protect personal information, an expert in cyber security and law says.

  • Apple confirms source code for iBoot leaked to GitHub

    Apple has confirmed that the source code for iBoot from a version of iOS was posted on GitHub on Thursday, with the company forced to make the admission as it filed a DMCA takedown request to the hosting site.

  • Warning hackers quick to bypass anti-virus walls in latest attacks

    Anti-virus software doesn’t stop new threats or advanced malicious-email attacks.as hackers use scam emails to deliver new ‘fast-break’ or ‘zero-day’ attacks, according to security firm MailGuard.

  • Thousands of students affected in online data leak

    According to Helsingin Sanomat the leak was due to an online security breach on the servers of the matriculation examination board's website. Approximately 7,695 students have fallen victim to the leak.

  • EFF vs IoT DRM, OMG!

    What with the $400 juicers and the NSFW smart fridges, the Internet of Things has arrived at that point in the hype cycle midway between "bottom line" and "punchline." Hype and jokes aside, the reality is that fully featured computers capable of running any program are getting cheaper and more powerful and smaller with no end in sight, and the gadgets in our lives are transforming from dumb hunks of electronics to computers in fancy cases that are variously labeled "car" or "pacemaker" or "Alexa."

    We don't know which designs and products will be successful in the market, but we're dead certain that banning people from talking about flaws in existing designs and trying to fix those flaws will make all the Internet of Things' problems worse.

GNOME: GNOME 3.28, FOSDEM 2018 and More

Filed under
GNOME
  • Entering the “home stretch” for GNOME 3.28

    Earlier this week I´ve released GNOME Maps 3.27.90 (even though I just read an e-mail about the deadline for the release tarballs had been postponed for one week just after uploading the tarball).

    This weekend I (like some 8000 others) participated in an exciting FOSDEM with lots of interesting talks and the week before that I gave presentation of GNOME Maps, and in particular the public transit functionality for TrafikLab (the sort of “developer community” driven by the Swedish organization Samtrafiken AB, who coordinates and aggregates data from all public transit operators, both commercial/private and regional/public ones.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: Behind the GNOME Booth, FOSDEM 2018

    Saturday was spent selling lots and lots of socks. I choose this year not to go to any talks and instead hangout with fellow GNOMEies in the booth and have a chat with bypassing users. I’m accumulating many advertising arguments for buying socks including that it allows you to have feet on your feet and that you have an excuse to say “GNOME Socks!” as much as you want, once you own a pair. Wink Kat brought the awesome hoodies and then we had a big load of leftover t-shirts from GUADEC 2017 which we more or less sold (I think there’s still some 20 left in small). In the end we sold a 160 pairs of socks which is almost half the enormous stock of socks I purchased. When the evening came by and the booth had to close, we went to the GNOME Beer Event in La Bécasse, where I had my annual taste of Lambic Blanc, which is one of the few beers I really enjoy drinking.

  • Speaking at FOSDEM 2018 in Brussels, Belgium

    I think that we in the GNOME community can use data to make more informed decisions. For example, right now we’re fading out our Bugzilla instance and we don’t really have any way to measure how successful we are. In fact, we don’t even know what it would mean to be successful. But by looking at data we might get a better feeling of what we are interested in and what metric we need to refine to express better what we want to know. Then we can evaluate measures by looking at the development of the metrics over time. Spontaneously, I can think of these relatively simple questions: How much review do our patches get? How many stale wiki links do we have? How soon are security issues being dealt with? Do people contribute to the wiki, documentation, or translations before creating code? Where do people contribute when coding stalls?

  • Gnome without chrome-gnome-shell

    New laptop, has a touchscreen, can be folded into a tablet, I heard gnome-shell would be a good choice of desktop environment, and I managed to tweak it enough that I can reuse existing habits.

    I have a big problem, however, with how it encourages one to download random extensions off the internet and run them as part of the whole desktop environment. I have an even bigger problem with gnome-core having a hard dependency on chrome-gnome-shell, a plugin which cannot be disabled without root editing files in /etc, which exposes parts of my destktop environment to websites.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • The cpu_features library

    "Write Once, Run Anywhere." That was the promise of Java back in the 1990s. You could write your Java code on one platform, and it would run on any CPU implementing a Java Virtual Machine.

    But for developers who need to squeeze every bit of performance out of their applications, that's not enough. Since the dawn of computing, performance-minded programmers have used insights about hardware to fine tune their code.

  • Google Rolls Out cpu_features Library

    Google's cpu_features library makes it easier for detecting modern CPU capabilities like FMA, SSE, and AVX extensions when writing hand-tuned code.

  • 3 steps to reduce a project's failure rate [Ed: "Open Decision Framework" the latest Red Hat openwashing sound bite]

    It's no secret that clear, concise, and measurable requirements lead to more successful projects. A study about large scale projects by McKinsey & Company in conjunction with the University of Oxford revealed that "on average, large IT projects run 45 percent over budget and 7 percent over time, while delivering 56 percent less value than predicted." The research also showed that some of the causes for this failure were "fuzzy business objectives, out-of-sync stakeholders, and excessive rework."

  • Symphony Now Available on OpenFin Through Open Source Contribution to Symphony Software Foundation

    OpenFin, the desktop operating system built specifically for the needs of capital markets, announced today that it has publicly contributed code to the Symphony Software Foundation that allows, for the first time, any OpenFin customer to deploy Symphony Chat on the OpenFin operating system. The integration, currently in beta testing, enables seamless deployment and interoperability of Symphony alongside the expanding ecosystem of applications already running on OpenFin.

  • 2 startups are joining forces — and together they could pose a threat to Bloomberg

    Symphony, a messaging service that has gained some traction among Wall Street firms, has been integrated into OpenFin, an operating system built for financial-services, the two companies announced Thursday. 

    OpenFin hosts more than a hundred applications on its platform, and the integration means Symphony will be "interoperable" with those apps, the same way social media apps on your phone are able to talk with one another.

    “By enabling Symphony to run on the OpenFin operating system, we are making it easy for our mutual customers to unify the Symphony desktop experience with their other OpenFin-based apps," Mazy Dar, chief executive of OpenFin, said of the news. 

  • Gleif and Swift debut open source BIC-to-LEI mapping

    The Global Legal Entity Identifier Foundation (GLEIF) has published the first monthly relationship file that matches a Business Identifier Code (BIC) assigned to an organization against its Legal Entity Identifier (LEI).
    With the launch of this open source file, GLEIF and SWIFT have pioneered a cooperation model that, for the first time, enables market participants to link and cross-reference these key entity identifiers free of charge. This will significantly streamline entity verification processes and reduce data management costs.

  • Integrating continuous testing for improved open source security

    To protect yourself, you need mechanisms to prevent vulnerable packages from being added, and to ensure you get alerted and can quickly respond to new vulnerability disclosures. This chapter will focus on the first concern, discussing how you can integrate SCA vulnerability testing into your process, and prevent the addition of new vulnerable libraries to your code. The next chapter will deal with responding to new issues.

    Preventing new security flaws is conceptually simple, and very aligned with your (hopefully) existing quality control. Because vulnerabilities are just security bugs, a good way to prevent them is to test for them as part of your automated test suite.

Linux: Detainting the Kernel, x86, and LF's Open Networking Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • diff -u: Detainting the Kernel

    Sometimes someone submits a patch without offering a clear explanation of why the patch would be useful, and when questioned by the developers, the person offers vague or hypothetical explanations. Something like that happened recently when Matthew Garrett submitted a patch to disable a running kernel's ability to detect whether it was running entirely open-source code.

    Specifically, he wanted to be able to load unsigned modules at runtime, without the kernel detecting the situation and "tainting" itself. Tainting the kernel doesn't affect its behavior in any significant way, but it is extremely useful to the kernel developers, who typically will refuse to chase bug reports on any kernel that uses closed-source software. Without a fully open-source kernel, there's no way to know that a given bug is inside the open or closed portion of the kernel. For this reason, anyone submitting bug reports to the kernel developers always should make sure to reproduce the bug on an untainted kernel.

  • Intel & AMD IOMMU Improvements Slated For Linux 4.16

    With the in-development Linux 4.16 kernel there are improvements to note for both AMD and Intel users.

  • The Complete Schedule for Open Networking Summit North America Is Now Live

        

    In addition, hear from industry visionaries in keynote sessions; attend LF Networking, Acumos Project, and Open Networking Foundation Developer Forums; and sign up for technical training on ONAP & OPNFV.

Graphics: AMDKFD, XWayland, RADV, Radeon Polaris

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDKFD GPUVM Support Updated For Radeon Discrete GPUs

    Many of you have been anxious to get ROCm/OpenCL compute working with the open-source Radeon Linux driver on modern GPUs while using a mainline kernel and that day continues inching closer.

    That long sought after goal should be achieved for Linux 4.17 and there are updated AMDKFD patches now available that work in that direction. But as noted previously, the Linux 4.17 mainline paired with working ROCm/OpenCL will initially be just for select GPUs while hardware like Vega will likely end up needing more time before it's running off a mainline kernel for GPGPU compute.

  • XWayland Gets Initial Support For EGLStreams To Support NVIDIA's Driver

    With the NVIDIA proprietary driver continuing to only support EGLStreams for their Wayland support until the new "Unix device memory allocator" project pans out, one of the big limitations has been no XWayland support for running X11 applications. Fortunately, that's now changing.

    Besides needing a Wayland compositor patched with EGLStreams support in order to work with the NVIDIA proprietary Linux driver, there hasn't been XWayland support with this approach. But Red Hat's Lyude Paul today published initial support for using XWayland with EGLStreams.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Now Exposes VK_EXT_external_memory_host

    RADV, the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver, now has external memory host support via the VK_EXT_external_memory_host extension that was recently introduced in the Vulkan 1.0.66 update.

  • WattMan Support Coming For Radeon Polaris GPUs On Linux

Red Hat: OpenShift, Mac Asay, and Fedora Project

Filed under
Red Hat

KDE: Slimbook, Decade of Plasma, Kubuntu Bionic and More

Filed under
KDE
  • Who, wha, FOSDEM?

    Underneath the Konqui Pinebook is my KDE Slimbook. Someone was handing out Nopetopus stickers; I wish I had gotten more. My Slimbook is starting to look a little beat-up — which is good, from a Hitch-Hikers-Guide-to-the-Galaxy point of view, since it’s been baked under the suns of Kakrafoon^WAlmeria, shivered in the snows of Allosymanius Syneca^W^WBrussels. At the KDE booth we were also could show a second-generation machine: the KDE Slimbook II (in Spanish, their English site doesn’t mention it yet). A faster, brighter version of the Free-Software friendly laptop with Linux and KDE Plasma pre-installed. This generation is a little more angled / chunky than the previous generation. It might get fewer “why do you guys have Macbooks .. oh, hey” comments. So an aluminum but not-quite-clamshell look might be more distinctive.

  • A Decade of Plasma

    I realised that it’s now a decade of KDE releasing its Plasma desktop.  The KDE 4 release event was in January 2008.  Google were kind enough to give us their office space and smoothies and hot tubs to give some talks and plan a way forward.

    The KDE 4 release has gained something of a poor reputation, at the time we still shipped Kubuntu with KDE 3 and made a separate unsupported release for Plasma, but I remember it being perfectly useable and notable for being the foundation that would keep KDE software alive.  It had been clear for sometime that Kicker and the other elements of the KDE 3 desktop were functional but unlikely to gain much going forward.  When Qt 4 was announced back in (I’m pretty sure) 2004 Akademy in Ludwigsberg it was seen as a chance to bring KDE’s desktop back up to date and leap forward.  It took 4 long years and to keep community momentum going we had to release even if we did say it would eat your babies.

  • Heading out of winter and into Spring

    In KDE, Plasma 5.12 has been released, and it is great! It has been released in time to make it into Kubuntu Bionic, our next big release which will become an LTS. Plasma 5.12 is a great fit there, since it is also an LTS. After living through the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerability early-exposure, it feels great to finally be back on track. We have it available right now in Artful (17.10) as well: https://kubuntu.org/news/plasma-5-12-arrives-in-backport-ppa-for-kubuntu-17-10-artful-aardvark/. I'm using it now.

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Schedule finalized
  • print-manager 0.4.0

    This last month I decided to do some work on print-manager, it’s code dates back to 2010, so it’s 8 years old now, my last commits where on 2014, after that Jan Grulich did the KF5/Qt5 port and last year I tried to do some improvements but only managed to do a single commit.

  • App popularity in Discover

    Currently, Discover sorts apps by popularity. In this case, popularity means “number of ratings”, and ratings come from user reviews. This is why GNOME Tweak Tool shows up first in Discover’s browse list: apparently it’s very popular among GNOME users, and they’ve written lots of reviews about it. We should all follow their lead and write some quality reviews about our favorite software; this helps the best apps bubble up to the top, and users love reading reviews from other users when determining whether or not to install an app.

  • SoK 2018 wrap-up report

Software: Audacity, Cryptomator, VLC, Corydalis, RcppEigen, Cockpit, Flowblade

Filed under
Software
  • Audacity – An Ideal App for Multi-Track Recording & Editing

    Great history is always made whenever the greats rub minds together. In some cases, it is a groundbreaking finding in chemistry or biology. In some others, it is the solution to problems that impeded our technological advancements using computers.

    In this case, it is the release of a free open-source digital audio and recording computer software application for Windows, GNU/Linux, and OS X – Audacity. It was built by Roger Dannenberg and Dominic Mazzoni at Carnie Mellon university, around fall, in the years 1999-2000.

  • Cryptomator - Encrypt your Cloud Data Files on Linux

    Figuring out a good path to security for your cloud data can be quite a challenge. Normally, the cloud is a very safe place for data, despite Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) from those who might want to access their data everywhere anytime. But the security is a very problem so we need to use some tools or methods in other to prevent the risks. This is why you can use some tools like cryptomator to encrypt your data files.

  • VLC 3.0 Should Be Out By The End Of The Week

    The long sought after VLC 3.0 multimedia player release will be here anytime now.

    VLC 3.0.0 was already tagged in Git and the final preparations are underway in putting out this major update to the open-source, cross-platform media player.

    The VLC project expects to officially announce v3.0 by the end of the week, but considering how long this release cycle has been drawn out, it wouldn't surprise me if it becomes a few extra days.

  • Releasing Corydalis

    So, without further ado, … wait, I already said everything! Corydalis v0.2.0 (a rather arbitrarily chosen version number) is up on GitHub.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.4.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.4.0 of RcppEigen hit CRAN earlier today, and just went to Debian as well. It brings Eigen 3.3.4 to R.

  • Cockpit 161

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 161.

  • Screencasts on Linux, part 2

    Well, no more, it seems. I seem to have missed a beautiful, functional, easy to use, and relatively fast one, called Flowblade.

    I had never heard of it, and I haven’t seen it mentioned on any of the sites I looked for video editing software reviews on. I only ran into it while browsing the available Flatpaks on Flathub. However, it has been in development for a couple of years, and it’s development seems active, though a bit dependent on a single coder.

    Having said that, I tip my hat to that single coder, who goes by the name of jliljebl, because this software is A-MA-ZING!

Purism's Updates on Librem and Librem 5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Qubes 4.0 fully working on Librem laptops, coreboot added IOMMU and TPM

    It’s easy to take things for granted when your computer runs a non-free proprietary BIOS. While the BIOS that comes with your computer is usually configured to match its features that’s not always the case. You end up with a sort of binary arrangement: if your BIOS supports a feature or allows you to change a setting, great, but if it doesn’t, you are generally out of luck. One example is with some of the new UEFI computers that ship with stripped-down BIOS options. One example we ran across recently had legacy boot disabled, secure boot enabled, and no way to change either setting, which is a terrible restriction for users wanting a free software distribution like PureOS or any another distribution that avoids the misnamed “secure boot” UEFI option.

  • Designing the Mobile Experience with Convergence in Mind

    It is always great to have the opportunity to discuss face to face with community members to get the pulse of what their thoughts are and suggestions they might have for the Librem 5 project. As such, I was happy to spend time discussing at length with people attending FOSDEM this week-end. Comments from the many supporters made me realize that there are some points regarding goals and vision, in terms of design for the entire Librem line, that needed to be expanded upon and clarified. Keep in mind that although the vision for our short and long-term design goals for the Librem 5 is becoming increasingly clearer, it is of course still “work in progress” from a design perspective; things are not set in stone and therefore we are listening (and responding) to the community’s feedback.

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A premium member this week had requested some benchmarks of openSUSE Tumbleweed when looking at the performance of KDE Plasma vs. GNOME Shell in some open-source graphics/gaming tests while also looking at the Wayland vs. X.Org Server performance. With KDE Plasma 5.12 that openSUSE Tumbleweed has picked up, there is much better Wayland session support compared to previous releases. While KDE developers aren't yet ready to declare their Wayland session the default, in my experience so far it's been working out very well but still routinely will find application crashes in Kate and the like when testing under the KWin's Wayland compositor. Read more

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