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Saturday, 22 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kernel Space/Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:45pm
Story GNU/Linux Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:44pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:40pm
Story Linux Devices: ESLOV, EOMA68, Android and Tizen Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:38pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:36pm
Story FOSS/Sharing in Government Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:33pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:32pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 4:31pm
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 1:27pm
Story Printing (3-D and 2-D) Roy Schestowitz 16/10/2016 - 1:11pm


Filed under
  • GTK+, version numbering, and long-term support

    GTK+ version 3.22 was released on September 21, bringing with it a range of improvements to Wayland support, gesture support for pressure-sensitive tablets, several new widgets, and more. The release also marks a turning point for how stable and development branches of the code will be maintained. Moving forward, the project is adopting a new scheme that allows it to designate certain stable releases for long-term support. The plan also breaks with past releases where version numbering is concerned, though the project is keen to downplay that change in favor of focusing on the support that stable releases will offer to downstream projects.

    The new release scheme was announced on September 1 in a Google+ post and an accompanying blog post written by Allan Day. The blog post explains more of the background issues that led up to the decision to adopt a new scheme.

  • Back from the GNOME Summit

    In practice, it turned out to be a great event. It was halfway between the traditional highly technical gathering and the “event aimed at new contributors”, with 13 attendees including myself.

  • gspell and LaTeXila fundraisings – thanks!

    The gspell fundraising has reached its initial goal! So thanks a lot for your support!

    Expect GtkEntry support in the next version of gspell, which is planned for March 2017.

Leftovers: Software

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  • 9 Best Free FTP Clients for Linux
  • 6 Best Linux Video Editing Software for Free Download

    Technology has been serving humanity with its best. It is a technology that has encouraged us to explore the unexplored and it is technology that gives us confidence. One such technology that has been changing the world is the movie making tools. Now it is a common thing to shoot a movie and edit it. You can do it in your PC. IT is that simple. This has encouraged many of us to explore the world of movie making. And for others just making a surprise birthday video or a wedding anniversary video is unexplainable. These are the videos that are uploaded all over the social media and these are the videos that make people famous at times. But who does the trick? That is when we need to mention the amazing movie editing tools that you can use online.

  • issue #49: kernel 4.8, IP Spoofing, RethinkDB, ProxySQL, Postgres, Elasticsearch & more!
  • issue #48: PostgreSQL 9.6, Security, Otto, armor, Config Mgmt Camp & more!
  • PacketFence v6.3 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PacketFence v6.3.0. This is a major release with new features, enhancements and important bug fixes. This release is considered ready for production use and upgrading from previous versions is strongly advised.

  • Rambox - an alternative Messaging and Email app for Ubuntu

    Gone were the days when the Internet was only used by corporates and tech enthusiasts. With government departments and services going online and even schools recommending online learning systems, the Internet is fast becoming a common household technology.

    As more and more people are learning to use the Internet, the number of those using emailing and messaging services is also going up. Consequently, the competition in the email and online messaging market is intensifying - just to give you an idea, a single company like Google is offering three services (Hangouts, Messenger, and now Allo) just for messaging purpose.

    This, in turn, has resulted in people using multiple services in order to get the best of all worlds. While there's no harm in using several services, you'd likely agree that after a point it becomes really difficult to manage and keep up with all of them. It's then when you start searching for a way that can make life easier for you.

    You'll be glad to know that there exists an application, dubbed Rambox, that's built specifically for this purpose - it lets you access all your commonly used web services from within a single window. In this article, we will discuss the basics of this application as well as the features it provides.

  • Freecell Solver 4.4.0 was Released
  • PVS-Studio is now friends with Linux

    PVS-Studio is a tool for bug detection in C, C++, and C# projects. It is intended for use in finding and fixing security and quality issues in code, before they turn into vulnerabilities, crashes, or painful debugging. Until now it was working for the developers who use the Visual Studio environment.

    The development team of PVS-Studio static code analyser has long and persistently been developing their product for Windows OS, and thus, proved itself as a reliable provider of high quality software.

    Now the team set a bigger goal and started Linux support. In the article devoted to their Linux support the author tells about various tasks that the programmers have set on the stage of the product development.

Linux Kernel News

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  • Perf Subsystem Updates Submitted For Linux 4.9
  • A look at the 4.8 development cycle [Ed: no longer behind paywall]

    As of this writing, the 4.8 development cycle is nearing its end. Linus has let it be known that a relatively unusual -rc8 release candidate will be required before the final release, but that still means that the cycle will only require 70 days, fitting into the usual pattern. A look at the development statistics for this release also fits the pattern about now.

    With regard to the release cycle, it has become boringly regular in recent years. The 3.8 kernel, released on February 18, 2013, came out on a Sunday, as has every subsequent release with the exception of 3.11, which was released on Monday, September 2, 2013. In these last few years, the only cycle that has taken longer than 70 days was 3.13, which required 77 days. The extra week that time around was forced by Linus's travels, rather than anything inherent in that cycle itself. Since then, every cycle has taken 63 or 70 days, with the sole exception of 3.16, which showed up in 56 (and one could quibble that it was really a 63-day cycle as well — that was the time Linus experimented with opening the merge window before the previous final release had been made).

  • What Makes the Linux Kernel Media API Documentation so Challenging?

    The first article of this series, described the efforts to provide a better documentation for the Linux Kernel. This article will explain how we handled the conversion of the Linux Media subsystem documentation.

  • MuQSS - The Multiple Queue Skiplist Scheduler v0.105
  • Systemd programming, 30 months later

Linux Graphics

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  • Fresh AMDGPU-PRO vs. NVIDIA OpenCL LInux Benchmarks - 11 GPUs

    While running the fresh NVIDIA vs. AMD Vulkan Linux benchmarks (that also included some OpenGL numbers too), I had also taken the opportunity to run some fresh OpenCL compute benchmarks of the latest NVIDIA 370 proprietary Linux driver against AMDGPU-PRO on different graphics cards.

    Just for kicks and some extra benchmarks to look at over the weekend, here are some fresh benchmarks of 11 different GPUs when using the latest NVIDIA (370.28) and AMDGPU-PRO (16.30.3) Linux drivers on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The open-source (Clover-based stack) wasn't used for any open-source AMD OpenCL testing due to its less than stellar state.

  • Marek Has Taken To Improving Mesa's GLSL Compiler Performance

    With catching up on the OpenGL extensions, Marek Olšák of AMD has been spending a fair amount of time on performance optimizations for the AMD's open-source OpenGL driver and some code that benefits Mesa as a whole too.

  • Nouveau NVC0 Preps For OpenGL 4.5 / GLSL 4.5

    Building off the exciting patches published Friday for completing ARB_enhanced_layouts that finish off the RadeonSI OpenGL 4.4~4.5 support, the Nouveau NVC0 support is basically done too with the finishing up of that final extension being done in the Mesa state tracker.

    Nouveau contributor Samuel Pitoiset went ahead and set the cap to enable ARB_enhanced_layouts for NVC0 along with exposing GLSL 4.5. The patches are currently on the mailing list but hopefully all of this latest GL4 work will hit Mesa Git in the week ahead to make it into the next Mesa release.

  • [Mesa-dev] radv initial submission

​Nextcloud/ownCloud Progress

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  • Indian Government Embraces ownCloud

    A government investing in free and open source software, rather than in proprietary solutions, is always a wonderful thing (unless it’s a poor implementation…). When I heard about India’s DigiLocker project, which is built on ownCloud, I was excited to learn more and grateful when someone from ownCloud was able to connect me with the project team.

  • New Nextcloud maintenance releases out with improved updater and over 40 fixes
  • Recent ownCloud Releases

    Even though we just had the nice and successful ownCloud Contributor Conference there have quite some ownCloud releases happened recently. I like to draw your attention to this for a moment, because some people seem to fail to see how active the ownCloud community actually is at the moment.

KDE Leftovers

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Ubuntu tablet, Oct 2016 - We need more!

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My October adventure is one of mixed emotions, again. One step forward, one step back, two to the side, a quick hopscotch through a minefield, and then you land your foot in dung but also find Cinderella's ever-so-smelly shoe amidst all that dross. That's the best way to describe the latest update and what it offers to the user.

Frankly, people would be far more inclined to ignore the stability bugs and the early release problems if they had proper apps to play with. They did it with Android. But when you have nothing meaningful to do, you start picking scabs and your nose, and one thing leads to another. In the desktop mode, there's more to do, yes. But the Store is just crippled at this point. Horrible. It causes serious damage to the Ubuntu Touch reputation. There has to be more there. More! Otherwise, it's just a sad graveyard of enthusiasm and dashed hopes. The touch side needs to shine, hook users in, make them feel that Ubuntu is all about fun and joy but also serious work.
Anyhow, nothing to be too excited about. There's more progress on the phone than the tablet, but that's understandable, the phone has been around for much longer. Still, I do hope Canonical will soon unleash dozens if not hundreds of modern and relevant apps to compensate for its other failings, and give the tablet the needed breathing space until the functional bugs can be ironed out. If not, all that users will have to play with will be issues, boredom and resentment. C'mon. Just do it!

If you'd still like a chance to win a tablet for your own games and entertainment, then take a look at my contest, link in the second paragraph of this article. There's still enough time, and plenty of opportunity. Worst case, just load it with Android. But let's hope we must never do that. Off you go reading, gents and ladies.

Read more

BeanDuino: Tiniest Arduino compatible ever?

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Pemi’s $10 “BeanDuino” DigiSpark clone gives you an 8-bit ATtiny85 MCU with 8K flash and a micro-USB in a 20 x 11mm package.

Pemi Technology is a Slovakian company run by Arduino hacker Bobricius, who wears a Star Trek Next Generation uniform, so you know you’re in solid geek territory here. Customers seemed to like Pemi’s 27 x 12mm PicoDuino Arduino clone, which like the new BeanDuino is a tiny, Arduino compatible based on Microchip/Atmel’s 8-bit ATtiny85 MCU. The BeanDuino is even smaller, at 20 x 11mm, which leads Bobricius to tap his communicator and announce: “I believe the BeanDuino is the smallest complete development platform in the world.”

Read more

today's leftovers

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  • Beginner’s Guide to the Linux Desktop

    There is much talk in the Linux world about the mythical “average user.” There is no such thing with Linux. First off, people who use Linux usually are those who know a thing or two about computers to begin with and want to take advantage of all the choices Linux offers. Linux has been considered the place for nerds, hackers and programmers for years. These folks are NOT typical at all. Secondly, it is unfortunate but true that most advanced Linux users are completely out of touch with what an average user really is.

    The vast majority Windows and Mac users are those who have learned just enough to get done what they need to get done. They’re clueless about how the machines they use everyday get those tasks accomplished and the idea of popping open a bash terminal to work with configuration files or fix problems is way out of their comfort zones. This does not mean that Linux can’t offer them a safe and friendly environment to work in, far from it. Linux offers a wide variety of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) that make working with a Linux box a point and click affair.

  • tint 0.0.2: Tint Is Not Tufte

    The tint package is now on CRAN. Its name stands for Tint Is Not Tufte and it offers a fresh take on the excellent Tufte-style html (and now also pdf) presentations.

  • Superb Mini Server(SMS) version 2.0.9 released

    Superb Mini Server finally got a new updated version release after a long time period.Yes, After a long awaited time,the previous version of SMS(Superb Mini Server)2.0.8 which was released back in 2015,now in 2016 got a new release of SMS 2.0.9.

    Even if the releases are less-frequent,this slackware based distribution really makes a good amount of users,who works with servers,mostly looks at this fellow distro,because of set of applications available and the environment is completely perfect for those who love to work with the web-server based developments and managements.

  • 2 Stocks Analyst-Opinion Need Close Attention Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT), Mondelez International Inc (NASDAQ:MDLZ)
  • Fedora 25 Beta a GO, Last Chance to Test Before Final

    The development cycle of Fedora 25 has suffered two setbacks causing the release dates to slip, the last time with the Alpha. But not today. The release team agreed that the Beta is ready to go on time. This will be the last public build before the Final, so now is the time to report those bugs. Fedora 25 will bring some new features to test, like Ctrl-Shift-e to type in Emoji.

    Jan Kurik posted this afternoon to the developers mailing list that the Fedora 25 Beta Go/No-Go Meeting had ended in a Go. There were five accepted blocker bugs earlier but the fixes are in and the team set about deciding on two proposed. The first concerned the Anaconda installer failing on RAID when it's in a "migrating state." It's reproducible by creating a new RAID-1 set and immediate starting the install. However, the team decided that since the install will complete if the user waits for the initial sync to complete it wasn't serious enough to hold up the Beta. They plan on having it fixed for Final as they've already decided it's an accepted Final blocker.

  • Debian/TeX update October 2016: all of TeX Live and Biber 2.6

    Finally a new update of many TeX related packages: all the texlive-* including the binary packages, and biber have been updated to the latest release. This upload was delayed by my travels around the world, as well as the necessity to package a new Perl module (libdatetime-calendar-julian-perl) as required by new Biber. Also, my new job leaves me only the weekends for packaging. Anyway, the packages are now uploaded and should appear soon on your friendly local server.

  • Will You Upgrade to Ubuntu 16.10 Next Week?

    The release date of Ubuntu 16.10 is now less than a week away — but do you plan to upgrade to the 'Yakkety Yak' once it arrives?

  • Samsung Z3 gets small firmware update in India – version BP12

    Today, the Samsung Z3 (model SM-Z300H) smartphone got a little software update in India, taking it to version Z300HDDU0BP12. This update only measure in at 5.9MB, so nothing much to really brag about, but still worth updating. This is a maintenance release and does not bring any new features with it and is mainly for performance and bug-fixes. No change log has been provided.

  • Samsung will be acquiring AI firm Viv Labs to build a Virtual assistant

Development News

Filed under
  • The most important coding languages for IoT developers

    We have seen a changing of the guard in the past few years as software takes center stage and once-beloved hardware simply becomes a canvas for developers. The ability to code is an important skill for the production of any modern technology, especially a product that falls within the “internet of things.” If IoT developers are to create the next big thing in tech, they will need to know the most important and popular IoT coding languages. Here is a list of top coding languages providing the backbone of IoT software:

  • French programmers haul Apple into court over developer rules

    Nexedi, an open source software company based in France, has filed a lawsuit against Apple in Paris alleging that Apple's App Store contract is unfair.

    In a blog post, founder and CEO Jean-Paul Smets and UI designer Sven Franck said that the company has undertaken the lawsuit to force Apple to improve its support for the latest web technology in iOS.

    Smets and Franck point to technical shortcomings in mobile Safari such as lack of support for HTML5 service workers, webRTC, and WebM – web technologies necessary for running applications like the OfficeJS spreadsheet and online conferencing.

  • Why we are suing Apple for better HTML5 support in iOS?

    The primary reason for starting this lawsuit is because we hope that it will help Apple to sooner support the latest Web and HTML5 standards on its iOS platform - the operating system used by all iPhones.

    Anyone running html5test ( on his iPhone will find out that current iOS support of HTML5 Web technologies is lagging behind other platforms.

  • Vulkan 1.0.30 Released With Minor Changes

    With "Vulkan Next" likely not debuting until 2017, the Vulkan 1.0.x point releases continue with minor fixes to the Vulkan documentation.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • The legacy of Pieter Hintjens

    When I watched Chad Fowler’s GOTO Amsterdam 2014 Keynote it got me thinking about what our aims should be in life.

    He mentions Joel Spolsky’s post from 2001: Good Software Takes Ten Years. Get Used To It, and says software typically only lasts five years so rarely gets to be very good.

    He asks, what does it take create legacy software with a positive meaning, that is software so good that you are fondly remembered for it for many years to come.

    How many very famous developers, or ex-developers are there in the world. You may disagree, but I would argue that Bill Gates is the only living person with worldwide fame partly associated with writing code.

    Only big company CEOs have any chance of becoming a household name. Even Sir Tim Berners Lee has only about half as many Twitter followers as Grumpy Cat.

  • AT&T Will Launch ECOMP Into Open Source in 2017

    A top AT&T executive said the company will launch its Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management, and Policy (ECOMP) platform into open source by the first quarter of 2017. And the Linux Foundation will be the host of the open source project.

    In a blog post, Chris Rice, SVP of AT&T Labs Domain 2.0 Architecture and Design, said that after the company developed ECOMP, it received a tremendous amount of feedback from service providers and virtual network function (VNF) providers that wanted more details about the platform. He also said the companies wanted AT&T to publicly state that it was going to open source the project.

  • What to Expect from OSCON London 2016

    It’s autumn/fall technology conference season… but you already knew that, so what’s coming next? O’Reilly’s OSCON event is just around the corner and the conference itself has seen the launch of many new projects from to OpenStack.

  • 8 Years Later: Saeed Malekpour Is Still In An Iranian Prison Simply For Writing Open Source Software

    We talk a great deal on Techdirt about the importance of free speech alongside the importance of not damning technological tools for the way third parties choose to use them. These matters can delve into minutiae in the American and Western forms of this conversation, with discussions about Section 230 protections and the like. But in other parts of the world, the conversation is much different.

    Back in 2008 in Iran, for instance, the government there elected to imprison a Canadian resident of Iranian lineage, initially under a death sentence, but later commuting that sentence to mere life imprisonment. His crime? Saeed Malekpour created some open source code for sharing photos on the internet that others within Iran used for pornography.

  • Why Implanted Medical Devices Should Have Open Source Code

    As medical implants become more common, sophisticated and versatile, understanding the code that runs them is vital. A pacemaker or insulin-releasing implant can be lifesaving, but they are also vulnerable not just to malicious attacks, but also to faulty code. For commercial reasons, companies have been reluctant to open up their code to researchers. But with lives at stake, we need to be allowed to take a peek under the hood.

    Over the past few years several researchers have revealed lethal vulnerabilities in the code that runs some medical implants. The late Barnaby Jack, for example, showed that pacemakers could be “hacked” to deliver lethal electric shocks. Jay Radcliffe demonstrated a way of wirelessly making an implanted insulin pump deliver a lethal dose of insulin.

    But “bugs” in the code are also an issue. Researcher Marie Moe recently discovered this first-hand, when her Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) unexpectedly went into “safe mode”. This caused her heart rate to drop by half, with drastic consequences.

    It took months for Moe to figure out what went wrong with her implant, and this was made harder because the code running in the ICD was proprietary, or closed-source. The reason? Reverse-engineering closed-source code is a crime under various laws, including the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act 1998. It is a violation of copyright, theft of intellectual property, and may be an infringement of patent law.

  • Google releases open-source Cartographer 3D mapping library

    Google has released open-sourced Cartographer, a real-time simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) library in 2D and 3D with ROS (Robot Operating System) support. This technology which works with the open source ROS can be used by developers for many things, such as robots, drones and self-driving cars.

  • Reverse lookups in GNS

    DNS allows to resolve the name of an IP address. This is sometimes called "reverse lookup". In fact, it is actually "normal" resolution of a PTR record. The name of such a record would be, for example, The .arpa TLD is managed by IANA.

    This blogpost is meant to spread ideas that have been exchanged via private email and might be interesting for a broader audience. If you feel like you have useful comments, don't hesitate to do so.

  • California launches nation's first state data portal built on open source

Linux Kernel News

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Wine and Games

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  • The Wine Stable Release 1.8.5 Is Now Available

    The Wine team released yesterday sixth stable release of 1.8 branch of Wine. Version 1.8.5 has many small changes including 58 bugfixes.

    This stable release contains bugfixes, new features are included in development releases from 1.9 branch.

  • 'Enclave', the 2003 action RPG now has a Linux beta that uses Wine

    'Enclave' [Steam] is another Wine-port from Topware Interactive who promised to bring their older published titles to Linux. I'm totally okay with this, and it's currently in Beta.

    Wine enables us to play a great many things we otherwise wouldn't be able to, so for developers to actually test it and release their old games with a build of Wine that works well, can only be good for us in the long run.

  • Just a heads up, PAYDAY 2 is currently broken again on Linux

    For the second time in only a few months, Overkill has managed to push out an update for PAYDAY 2 [Steam] that has completely broken the Linux version.

    The developers have noted they are aware of it, but no solution has been offered as of right now.

  • 'Noob Squad' is a perfect example of why Valve need to pay more attention to their own store [Ed: Mono.]
  • Linux-Friendly X-Plane 11 Flight Simulator Shipping Later This Year

    X-Plane, one of the most realistic flight simulators that continues to be cross-platform, will be released "this holiday season" and it offers more flying improvements and much better visuals.

    The X-Plane crew announced today, "X-Plane 11 is the detailed, realistic, and modern simulator you’ve been waiting for. And it’s coming this holiday season."

    X-Plane 11 is slated to have a completely redesigned UI, improved 3D high-definition cockpits, new effects, realistic avionics, "living" airports, and a variety of new buildings, roads, and other scenery.

Android Leftovers

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KDE Frameworks 5.27 Released for Plasma 5.8 with New MIME Types Icons, Bug Fixes

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Today, October 8, 2016, KDE announced the monthly release of the KDE Frameworks project, a collection of over 70 add-on libraries to the Qt5 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.27 Released

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.27.0

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.
  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells
    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it. We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42
    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday). But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.
  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti
    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.
  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version
    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively. Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying. Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.
  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript
    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta. Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.
  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop
    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.
  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading
    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks. SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects. In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.
  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.