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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:40am
Story Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:39am
Story Leftovers: Gaming (X-Plane and 'Battle Chasers: Nightwar') Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:37am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:35am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:35am
Story Phones/Devices With Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:34am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:33am
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:32am
Story Assimilation That Confuses/Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 29/11/2016 - 12:31am

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
  • N900: 2016 Week 47

    On November 8, 2016, the proto_v2 schematics were updated to the current version. We finished the last few improvements and our layouter is scheduling the layout to start in one week. We repeat our invitation to give the schematics a peer review: it's your last chance to peel your eyes on these schematics and be picky about details that our engineering team might have missed.

  • A Glimpse at Nodio, the Blockchain-Based Router

    A new device called Nodio has been recently announced that can run multiple decentralized applications (dApps), a Tor node, and other functionalities. Nodio is a blockchain router that aims to give users a chance to create decentralized solutions.

  • Packet.net strong-ARMs cloud for $0.005 per core per hour

    Packet.net, a bare-metal cloud aimed at developers, has flicked the switch on cloud-running servers powered by a pair of Cavium's 48-core ARMv8-A ThunderX processors.

    CEO Zachary Smith told The Register that the company's cooked up the cloud for a few reasons. Price is one: Packet will offer ARM cores at a tenth of the price it charges for Intel cores, at US$0.50 per hour per server, or $0.005 per core per hour. Smith thinks that will be a head-turner by itself.

  • Samsung Offers Developers $10,000 Per App Via Tizen Mobile App Incentive Program

    In the first half of 2014, Samsung released the Samsung Gear S2 smart watch running on Tizen, an open source, Linux-based operating system. Early in 2015, Samsung released the Samsung Z1 smartphone, which also ran on Tizen, in India for approximately $127. It was followed by the Z3 that got rolled out in Oct. 2015.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Minoca OS — An Interview With One Of The Engineers Of Open Source Operating System

    Everyone benefits in some way when a new operating system comes out, especially when that operating system is open source. Minoca OS is a case of just that, and what’s more is that it has been written entirely from the ground up, further contributing to the software landscape.

    Evan Green is the CEO of Minoca Corp, the organization currently maintaining Minoca OS, as well as a co-founder and engineer of Minoca OS. Evan has was kind enough to answer some questions about Minoca OS for us.

  • Open source and the problem of pure maintenance

    One of the things that people using open source often wish loudly for (via) is software that's stable and only gets bug fixes, including security updates, with no other changes at all. Oh, and they want this for free as part of an open source project.

    As you may have guessed, there is a fundamental problem with this. Indeed it is a classical fundamental problem in software development in general, namely that doing only maintenance is boring and very few people want to do it (especially for free, such as with open source software). This is why it's really quite hard to find anyone who does a good job of maintenance, especially over the long term and most especially for free. There are people who will provide you with well maintained systems that stay carefully stable for years, but generally they want money (often a fair amount of it).

  • List of RSS Feeds of GNU/Linux & Free Software/Open Source Related Websites

    There are so many websites, planets, or blogs related to Free Software/Open Source (FLOSS) and GNU/Linux in English. It is difficult for someone to grabs many of their RSS feeds one by one. To solve this, I try to collect many URL of RSS feeds of them here. This is not complete by now (November 15th 2016) but I planned to complete the missing links below as soon as possible. I hope this list helps anyone in free software community worldwide.

  • Project proposal: The GNUnet of autonomous Things
  • Is SVG 2 really on life support?

    Between SVG 1.1 W3C Recommendation and SVG 2 in its current form, people have raised kids and sent them off to the college. And yet SVG 2 might arrive sometime in the future without quite a few useful features that have been already developed and tested. What's up with that?

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • RHEL 7.3 Firewalld new features.
  • Stocks To Track: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Apollo Commercial Real Estate Finance, Inc. (ARI), EnLink Midstream Partners, LP (ENLK)
  • Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) Analyst Opinion
  • Fedora - retiring xorg-x11-drv-synaptics

    The Fedora Change to retire the synaptics driver was approved by FESCO. This will apply to Fedora 26 and is part of a cleanup to, ironically, make the synaptics driver easier to install.

    Since Fedora 22, xorg-x11-drv-libinput is the preferred input driver. For historical reasons, almost all users have the xorg-x11-drv-synaptics package installed. But to actually use the synaptics driver over xorg-x11-drv-libinput requires a manually dropped xorg.conf.d snippet. And that's just not ideal. Unfortunately, in DNF/RPM we cannot just say "replace the xorg-x11-drv-synaptics package with xorg-x11-drv-libinput on update but still allow users to install xorg-x11-drv-synaptics after that".

  • OCaml 4.04, RISC-V, S/390, POWER and more …

    And talking about Fedora/RISC-V, it took a month, but the mass-rebuild of all Fedora packages completed, and now we’ve got about ⅔rds of all Fedora packages available for RISC-V. That’s quite a lot:

  • FUDCon 2016 Phnom Penh, Cambodia

    FUDCon (Fedora Users and Developers Conference) is an important event in the world of free software that is held in different parts of the world organized by Fedora Organization. The FUDCon comprised of sessions, talks, workshops and hackfest in which project participants worked on specific initiatives. FUDCon Phnom Penh was conducted at Norton University, Phnom Penh along Barcamp ASEAN. Around 50 speakers from around the world gave talks related to entrepreneurship and open source software. I was traveling with one my friends, Abhinand N, who also got selected to deliver a talk on Mediawiki. Looked like, we were the only two undergrads who were invited to deliver talks.

Microsoft 'Loves' Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • How to contribute to an open source project on GitHub

    A step by step guide that will show you how to contribute to an open source project on GitHub, one of the most popular and used git repository hosting services.

    GitHub is the home of many popular open source projects like Ruby on Rails, jQuery, Docker, Go and many others.

    The way people (usually) contribute to an open source project on GitHub is using pull requests. A pull request is basically a patch which includes more information and allows members to discuss it on the website.

    This tutorial will guide you through the whole process to generate a pull request for a project.

  • The code I’m still ashamed of

    The more software continues to take over every aspect of our lives, the more important it will be for us to take a stand and ensure that our ethics are ever-present in our code.

    Since that day, I always try to think twice about the effects of my code before I write it. I hope that you will too.

  • Not only coders are hard to recruit

    The problem with technical positions such as programmers or system administrators is that there is an actual difference between knowing an algorithm/programming language/software and actually implementing it. For instance, Johnny found it hard to differentiate between someone who said he knows about Apache web server and someone who can actually administer it. Johnny said ( this later became our headline):

  • PHP 7, LessPass, addrwatch, tmux, bash, PackPack & more!

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” – Default skin: Next Gen

    Past March we announced that v17 would feature a brand new default skin called Estuary and since then it has been included in every build we have released. During this period our developers kept improving on how it looked, behaved and made use of the latest features that got included from what is shaping up to be the final release of v17. Since more and more users also started to use these development builds we started to receive a lot of feedback, where most was positive there was also some negative or at least constructive comments. As we are not deaf to these comments and try to create the best experience, our skin developer phil65 went back to the drawing board and rethought on how to incorporate this feedback into wat should become the final skin. With some help from ryanmah for the mockups, ichabod-fletchman for helping out this didn’t resulted in a total rewrite but simply reworking some parts of how the skin looks and behaves. The underlying skin code still remains the same for a very large part except for the parts where a smarter way of doing this magic was found. The visual top layer what you will see should still feel quite familiar if you have used any past v17 builds as not everything was redone.

  • Fix Ubuntu/Linux Mint boot and grub issues with Boot-Repair

    Boot-Repair is around from quite sometime, released under license GNU-GPL and it is great tool to fix the issues with your Grub and Boot, it repair frequent boot issues you may encounter in Ubuntu like when you can't boot Ubuntu after installing Windows or another Linux distribution, or when you can't boot Windows after installing Ubuntu, or when GRUB is not displayed anymore, some upgrade breaks GRUB, etc. Boot-Repair lets you fix these issues with a simple click, which (generally re-installs GRUB and) restores access to the operating systems you had installed before the issue.

  • Sayonara: Try another great audio player in Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Ubuntu Derivatives

    Sayonara is a simple, lightweight and quite fast audio player only for Linux which is written in C++, it also supportet by Qt framework. For audio backend it uses gstreamer. It carries a lot of feature to manage big audio collections. While developing this program they focused on it's performance, it consumes very low CPU and memory.

    One of Sayonara's goals are intuitive and easy usability never leading to the impression you are using an unnecessary bloated program therefore it should be able to compete with the most popular music players. It has a lot of features like a library, id3 tag editor, equalizer, lastfm radio, lastfm scrobbler, stream recorder and so on..

  • PacketFence v6.4 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of PacketFence v6.4.0. This is a major release with new features, enhancements and important bug fixes. This release is considered ready for production use and upgrading from previous versions is strongly advised.

  • Bypass ISP Website Censorship With Alkasir 2.0

    Alkasir is a free, open source website censorship circumvention tool, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Android and iOS versions are "main objectives for 2016". For now it only works with Google Chrome.

  • "ANGRYsearch" and "FSearch" Helps You Find Your Files/Folders Quickly And Easily

    ANGRYsearch is a simple and lightweight tool to find files/folders from your mounted drives quickly and easily, it is written in Pythong and inspired from "Everything" which is available for Windows. It displays results as you type the name of the file/folder you are looking for.

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Portable system services

    In the refereed track of the 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference, Lennart Poettering presented a new type of service for systemd that he calls a "portable system service". It is a relatively new idea that he had not talked about publicly until the systemd.conf in late September. Portable system services borrow some ideas from various container managers and projects like Docker, but are targeting a more secure environment than most services (and containers) run in today.

    There is no real agreement on what a "container" is, Poettering said, but most accept that they combine a way to bundle up resources and to isolate the programs in the bundle from the rest of the system. There is also typically a delivery mechanism for getting those bundles running in various locations. There may be wildly different implementations, but they generally share those traits.

  • Kernel 4.8.7 fixes Realtek card disconnects!

    Ladies and gentlemen, this is the day worth remembering. The long outstanding problem with the disconnects on a variety of Realtek Wireless devices, my RTL8723BE included, which has shown problems time and again in pretty much every single distro out there, has been finally resolved. Word.

    A reader emailed me a few days back and said the new kernel 4.8.7 fixes the issue. I decided to test this, and completed a long and arduous set of checks in Manjaro 16.10, which has the kernel 4.8.7 available in its repos. One of the perks of bleeding-edge Arch-based distros. The Manjaro review is still a few weeks away, but we can at least focus on this burning issue. Let me proudly and happily elaborate.

  • Making WiFi fast

    The result of all this work is WiFi latencies that are less than 40ms, down from a peak of 1-2 seconds before they started, and much better handling of multiple stations running at full rate. Before the changes, a test involving 100 flows all starting together collapsed entirely, with at most five flows getting going; all the rest failed due to TCP timeouts caused by excessive buffering latency. Afterward, all 100 could start and run with reasonable latency and bandwidth. All this work, in the end, comes down to a patch that removes a net 200 lines of code.

    There are some open issues, of course. The elimination of the queuing discipline layer took away a number of useful network statistics. Some of these have been replaced with information in the debugfs filesystem. There is, he said, some sort of unfortunate interaction with TCP small queues; Eric Dumazet has some ideas for fixing this problem, which only arises in single-station tests. There is an opportunity to add better air-time fairness to keep slow stations from using too much transmission time. Some future improvements, he said, might come at a cost: latency improvements might reduce the peak bandwidth slightly. But latency is what almost all users actually care about, so that bandwidth will not be missed — except by Ham the monkey.

  • Enhanced File Stats Being Worked On For The Linux Kernel

    Red Hat has been working on a new statx system call for the Linux kernel to provide "enhanced" file information.

    This new statx() system call would be able to return the file's creation time, data version number, and other new attributes not currently provided. These new attributes wouldn't work for all file-systems, but would work for a subset of them such as CIFS, NFS, and others that track such information.

  • Btrfs Heatmap - visualize your filesystem
  • RAID5/6 scrub race fix
  • Intel Vulkan Linux Driver Now Has Patches For Fast Clears

    Building off the input attachments work earlier this week for the Intel open-source Vulkan driver (covered in More Intel ANV Vulkan Code Hits Mesa Git, Other Patches Pending), there are now patches up for review to implement support for fast clears.

    Jason Ekstrand at the Intel Open-Source Technology Center who has been leading the "ANV" Vulkan driver effort wrote this Saturday, "This little series builds on top of the input attachment series I sent out earlier this week and adds support for fast clears in Vulkan. I've tested it on both Sky Lake and Haswell and it has no regressions over the input attachments series."

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Unity 8 snap rev 178
  • Get A Live Preview Of A Window From Another Workspace With WindowSpy (Unity)

    WindowSpy is a new Unity AppIndicator that allows displaying a small live (well, almost) preview of a window on another workspace.

  • Recent Notifications Indicator Lets You Access Missed Desktop Notifications

    Recent Notifications is an Ubuntu Indicator that collects desktop notifications, displaying them in its menu. This is useful if you missed some important notification for various reasons, like being away from the computer, etc.

  • Making your snaps available to the store using snapcraft

    Now that Ubuntu Core has been officially released, it might be a good time to get your snaps into the Store!

  • MacBuntu 16.10 Transformation Pack for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Yosemite/El Capitan) transformation pack is ready to take off and land on your Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak. It offers two themes for GTK (which supports: Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate and Xfce), one theme for Gnome Shell, one for Cinnamon, two icon packs, and cursors. Unlike last time we are not sharing boot/splash for macbuntu and theme for lightdm-webkit because there are some issues within the Ubuntu 16.10. Slingscold which is known as launchpad, it does work on some desktops but it may don't work for some users and you may see blank launcher. We are using and recommending Plank dock with this pack because it is lightweight and works with all desktops without any issues. Also credit goes to Jared for helping us with this transformation pack. By following these instructions you can change look of your Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety to look like Mac. In previous packs we used LightDM webkit theme which looks quite similar to Mac OS X login screen, this time we aren't offering, because we experienced a lot of issues after installing it (like: not able to login/blank screen). Also Bootscreen has some issues.

  • Adding Sega Genesis to EmulationStation on Ubuntu
  • Busting Major Myths Around elementary OS

    The open source desktop landscape is complicated. There are many distros, many desktop environments, and so many things to know about each of them. We often see folks fall into some of the same pieces of misinformation when reporting on or commenting about elementary OS. So here’s a look at some of the major myths around elementary OS and what the actual facts are.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

8 Major Advantages of Using MySQL

Filed under
Server
OSS

MySQL is a free-to-use, open-source database that facilitates effective management of databases by connecting them to the software.

Read more

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • fill bug reports!

    Everything starts with a good idea or a bug report. Someone asked for an app icon for claws mail (https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=371914) and Jens Reuterberg make one. As I don’t think that every application need an breeze specific app icon, I’m look more for a consistent look of the applications so I made an claws breeze icon theme. You can download the icon pack from the claws webpage and dont’t forget to give me feedback cause I don’t use claws.

  • Cutelyst benchmarks on TechEmpower round 13

    Right on my first blog post about Cutelyst users asked me about more “realistic” benchmarks and mentioned TechEmpower benchmarks. Though it was a sort of easy task to build the tests at that time it didn’t seem to be useful to waste time as Cutelyst was moving target.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 branches created
  • KSyntaxHighlighting – A new Syntax Highlighting Framework

    This year, on March 31st, KDE’s advanced text editor Kate had its 15th birthday. 15 years are a long time in the software world, and during this time Kate won the hearts of many users and developers. As text editing component, Kate uses the KTextEditor framework, which is used also by applications such as KDevelop or Kile.

    The KTextEditor framework essentially is an embeddable text editing component. It ships everything from painting the line numbers, the background color, the text lines with syntax highlighting, the blinking cursor to code completion and many more features. One major feature is its very powerful syntax highlighting engine, enabling us to properly highlight around 275 languages.

    Each syntax highlighting is defined in terms of an xml file (many examples), as described in Kate’s documentation. These xml files are read by KTextEditor and the context based highlighting rules in these files are then used to highlight the file contents.

  • KStars 2.7.2 for Windows is released

    Less than a month from the release 2.7.0, KStars v2.7.2 for Windows 64bit is now available for download on KStars website! Get it now and give it a go.

  • Multiple notifications across multiple monitors in KDE Plasma 5?

    I have 3 monitors, and on each monitor, I have a Plasma panel at the bottom. When any notification pops up, I get 3 notifications on each monitor. I have a full fledged panel on each monitor with everything including task bar and system tray.

  • Interview with Katharina

    I love the professionality of Krita. It really does not need to hide behind the big guys in business. You can use your photoshop or whatever brushes and formats and many more, there is no “Meh, that brush is not made by us, you can’t use it!“. The user interface is smart and chic, the brushes work smooth and I never had any problems with my hardware. It simply combines everything I need, without the need to check a manual too often. It feels effortless to use it! And also it is nice to find other Krita artists randomly on the internet, it is always a nice way to start a conversation.

  • Wiki(1.0), what’s going on? (Part17)
  • Minuet in KDE Applications 16.12: code convergence, tablet UX and Windows release

    Yesterday was the feature freeze for KDE Applications 16.12 and that's the time where you look forward for all the new awesome features will land at users devices at 15th December. As for the Minuet land, I'd like to disappointingly let you know no new features are coming but that doesn't mean things are not progressing. After some days of quite intense work ‒ trying to find some spare time between daily job, my fluffy 10 month old baby <3, and the work on the KDE e.V. board ‒ I'm right now enjoying some booze while writing these words about recent advances in Minuet.

Kubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak - Cautiously good?

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Let us draw the verdict. It's a strange one. Oddly, this is probably the best Kubuntu that I've tested in a long time. Sadly, that's like saying losing one finger in a freak chainsaw accident is better than losing two fingers. Not the best measure stick. Not something to be proud of. There are many, many problems in Yakkety Yak Plasma, including but not limited to the application stack, stability, performance, package management, and the ability to customize. That's not a happy list.

Brave face on, we also have a lot of goodies to focus on. A very decent - and FIRST for Plasma - smartphone support stack and multimedia playback as they should be. Lots of old bugs have been fixed. If only we had Samba printing support out of the box, and the network card driver was given a little bit of love, this might be a reasonable distro.

Kubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak is nothing to be proud of, but it is an okay Plasma release that has redeemed a whole generation of failed distributions in the past year or so. It's funny how it's gone from being my favorite to a pariah, and now it's slowly recovering. Such a waste of effort. And why? There was really no need for this whole regression saga. Anyhow, the road to success is still a long and perilous one. It will take a lot more before Kubuntu becomes a recommended household item again. But at the very least, 16.10 is showing a little of that promise. 7/10, if I'm being generous, more like 6/10, but you might want to give it a spin and see what gives. QED.

Read more

Under the (Linux) Hood

Filed under
Linux

We’ve often heard that you don’t need to know how an engine works to drive a car, but you can bet that professional race car drivers know. By analogy, you can build lots of systems with off-the-shelf boards like Raspberry Pis and program that using Python or some other high-level abstraction. The most competent hackers, though, know what’s going on inside that Pi and what Python is doing under the hood down to some low level.

If you’ve been using Linux “under the hood” often means understanding what happens inside the kernel–the heart of the Linux OS that manages and controls everything. It can be a bit daunting; the kernel is simple in concept, but has grown over the years and is now a big chunk of software to approach.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu Mate, Windows 10 and macOS Sierra: A marriage of 3 OSs

    I gave myself a little gift recently and revisited Ubuntu Mate by virtue of a transplanted hard disk.

    In my case, Mate was a gift that was giving and giving until it wasn’t.

    When the eMachines T6528 went belly up due to leaky logic board capacitors, I parted this tank of a tower out, half-heartedly vowing to get back to this low-footprint Linux distribution as soon as I could.

    Fast forward several months and with some precious free time on my hands, I was finally able to make good on the promise.

  • Ubuntu Core [Comic]

    Nowadays, Linux processes are forever in conflict. Is there somewhere out there for them to live together in harmony... perhaps by separating them via full resource isolation?

  • The Dashbot is a $49 gadget that turns your car into Knight Rider's KITT
  • Dashbot is a $49 hands-free, in-car controller for your phone (crowdfunding)
  • Quick Notes from Smartphone Wars - Kodak, Nintendo, Lenovo and Blaupunkt

    A few quick notes from a few less-familiar players in smartphone wars. So yes, I'll do the math shortly on Q3 smartphone market (nothing exciting there, we know Samsung, Apple, Huawei are the top 3, the excitement is long gone from that 'race').

    But first off, as I was doing some back-log Tweets of old tech news items to cover, on Twitter, today, I noticed a few interesting tidbits of smartphone-related news. These are all October-timeframe news items (so they're old but went to cover them anyway).

  • BH 1.62.0-1

    The BH package on CRAN was updated to version 1.62.0. BH provides a large part of the Boost C++ libraries as a set of template headers for use by R, possibly with Rcpp as well as other packages.

    This release upgrades the version of Boost to the upstream version Boost 1.62.0, and adds three new libraries as shown in the brief summary of changes from the NEWS file which follows below.

  • Rcpp 0.12.8: And more goodies

    Yesterday the eighth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R where the Windows binary has by now been generated too; the Debian package is on its way as well. This 0.12.8 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, and the 0.12.7 release in September --- making it the twelveth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. While we are keeping with the pattern, we have managed to include quite a lot of nice stuff in this release. None of it is a major feauture, though, and so we have not increased the middle number.

  • Axcient Introduces Expanded Support for Linux on Fusion Platform
  • ESG Validates One-Hour Recovery of Data Centers with Axcient Fusion
  • Axcient Announces Linux Support and Enhanced Orchestration for Fusion

Server Administration

Filed under
Server
  • Cloud Native: Service-driven Operations that Save Money, Increase IT Flexibility

    I obsess about operations. I think it started when I was a department IT manager at a financial services institute. It was appallingly difficult to get changes deployed into production and the cost of change was spectacularly high. It felt like there had to be a better way, and most every decision I have made professionally since 2008 has led me to work on technology that makes that guy or gal’s life easier.

  • Planning Microservices: Know the Tradeoffs With Monolithic Design

    By now, you no doubt understand the advantages of using a microservices architecture, especially in greenfield applications and in new organizations that need to achieve efficiencies wherever they can. But what about your legacy code and applications? Do you totally rewrite the monolith or do you chip away at it with new functionalities, added as microservices, over time?

  • Docker Containers and Synnex Distribution? Oh My

    In a quiet corner at the Synnex Varnex conference, Rob Moyer is pulling back the curtain — just a bit — on the Synnex CloudSolv strategy for channel partners. The conversation with ChannelE2E includes some familiar themes. But there are also some surprises — including a serious bet on container technology and Docker.

    Synnex CloudSolv is a management and deployment platform that helps channel partners to activate cloud solutions for their end-customers. Moyer, VP of software and cloud services at Synnex, isn’t pursuing a toe-to-toe cloud marketplace battle against Ingram Micro, Tech Data and other distributors. Instead of vetting hundreds of software and SaaS solutions for online distribution, Moyer discreetly but purposely made a few strategic bets — including Docker, Microsoft Office 365, Google G Suite (particularly for education) and Red Hats.

  • 5 Common Myths about Containers

    Containers are faster. Containers work only on Linux. Containers are insecure. These are all examples of myths about Docker and other container platforms that continue to persist.

    Some of these misconceptions reflect popular misunderstandings of containers. Others are based on information that was once accurate, but is no longer true. Either way, these myths are important to clear up if you want to deploy containers effectively.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source Solves and Supports Today's Business Needs

    Open source is free software that developers make available to benefit the community. The original developer of the software benefits from making their code freely available because doing so increases the number of end users with the ability to enhance the software. These enhancements can make the software more valuable for all. Some examples of open source software include Android, Wikipedia, Mozilla Firefox, WordPress and Drupal.

  • Calendar sharing in the XXIth century

    But the point is this one: It is 2016 and shared calendars that should be simple and straightforward are both complex and obscure. People should not think twice about what to use: they should be able to share their calendars seamlessly, post it online, move from one provider to another with very little hassle. Instead of this most are locked in and when they want to move to another provider the notion that they should learn about the various calendar sharing protocols is simply outlandish.

  • Can Node.js Scale? Ask the Team at Alibaba

    Alibaba is arguably the world’s biggest online commerce company. It serves millions of users and hosts millions of merchants and businesses. As of August 2016, Alibaba had 434 million users with 427 million active mobile monthly users. During this year’s Singles Day, which happened on November 11 and is one of the (if not the) biggest online sales events, Alibaba registered $1 billion in sales in its first five minutes.

  • Five Tenets of Thriving with Open Source without Risking Your Business

    Vendors, university researchers, students, and developers find that open source is a very effective tool for validating a solution to a particular problem. However, these solutions are often born within the context of a specific company’s use case or a specific research problem. Therefore, these projects are similar to code built in the context of a professional services engagement and often don’t have the polish and finish of an enterprise product. Some may not even have solved basic enterprise requirements like availability, resilience, security, and so on.

  • New Business Intelligence Performance Benchmark Reveals Strong Innovation Amongst Open-Source projects
  • A New Tool for LibreOffice

    Tony Get, my colleague, showed me an interesting tool available in Android: it's an app to turn your Android device into a remote control to work with your LibreOffice Impress presentations. It is called Impress Remote and it is very easy to use.

  • Centiq’s open source contribution speeds up HANA DevOps
  • Intel Quark SE Support Added To GCC Compiler

    Support for Intel's low-power Quark SE micro-controller has been added to the GNU Compiler Collection.

  • GDS Appoints Anna Shipman As Open Source Lead

    The Government Digital Service (GDS) has appointed its first open source lead, with the goal of driving the use of open source platforms and frameworks throughout Whitehall and beyond.

    Anna Shipman, who has been at GDS for several years will step into the role, having worked extensively with open source as the development lead for GDS’s open source infrastructure provisioning project vCloud Tools.

    Shipman also has experience working with open source projects outside of GDS with her work on government-as-a-platform, the GDS objective to create a range of open and reusable digital components that can be used to create digital services without the need for costly, bespoke systems.

  • Director's Forum: A Blog from USPTO's Leadership

    Improving the way the government delivers information technology (IT) solutions to its customers isn’t just a goal, it’s our mission. We at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office know that by publishing our open source code, the public can help us come up with new and better IT solutions. In advance of the new Federal Source Code Policy and in support of the Administration’s Open Government Initiative, we have been publishing content on Github for over a year, and it now includes source code for a mobile application for trademarks.

  • Data Pipeline goes open, changing business models, and more open source news

    The world of open source software is a busy place. Sometimes keeping up with all of the news, announcements, and cool things to be discovered can be difficult. Here's a look at some of what we're reading today.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • The future of xinput, xmodmap, setxkbmap, xsetwacom and other tools under Wayland
    This post applies to most tools that interface with the X server and change settings in the server, including xinput, xmodmap, setxkbmap, xkbcomp, xrandr, xsetwacom and other tools that start with x. The one word to sum up the future for these tools under Wayland is: "non-functional". An X window manager is little more than an innocent bystander when it comes to anything input-related. Short of handling global shortcuts and intercepting some mouse button presses (to bring the clicked window to the front) there is very little a window manager can do. It's a separate process to the X server and does not receive most input events and it cannot affect what events are being generated. When it comes to input device configuration, any X client can tell the server to change it - that's why general debugging tools like xinput work.
  • Please don't use pastebins in bugs
  • Linux Top 3: SparkyLinux 4.5, Mageia 5.1 and Peppermint 7
    SparkyLinux is (yet another) Debian based Linux distribution. The SparkyLinux 4.5 update codenamed "Tyche' was released on December 3, providing users with multiple desktop choice other than GNOME. SparkLinux 4.5 ships with KDE, LXDE, LXQt, MATE and Xfce.
  • Upcoming Linux Distributions Releasing In December 2016
    In December 2016, a big Linux distribution release is taking shape in the form of Linux Mint 18.1 Serena, flavored by Cinnamon 3.2. It’ll be accompanied by the release of security and privacy-focused Anonymous Live CD Tails 2.9.
  • AMD Extends Strategic Partnership with Mentor Graphics for Linux-based Embedded Solutions
  • Samsung Z2 gets Firmware Update to Tizen 2.4.0.6 Z200FDDU0BPK3 in India
    Samsung’s latest Tizen-based smartphone, the Z2 model number SM-Z200F, has had a new software / firmware update land in India today. The update takes it to Tizen version 2.4.0.6., firmware Z200FDDU0BPK3. The update log mentions the following improvements: Improved send SOS message (panic mode) and also improvements to the security of the device. Additional bug fixes and performance improvements may have also been bundled in.

Leftovers: Software

  • choqok 1.6 Twitter Client was released and completely ported with KDE Frameworks 5
    Choqok is a fast, efficient and simple to use twitter client for Linux (especially built for the KDE desktop environment) that is installed by default to some of the Linux distribution which shipped with KDE Desktop Environment. The name comes from an ancient Persian word, means Sparrow!
  • 10 open source tools for your sysadmin toolbox [Ed: Terrible list which starts with two suggestions of Microsoft EEE]
    Sysadmins, no matter what platforms they work on, are awash in great open source software tools. In this article, we highlight well-known—and not-so-well-known—tools that have released new versions in 2016.
  • NetworkManager 1.2.6 Lets You Activate Multiple PPPoE Connections Simultaneously
    Beniamino Galvani was proud to announce the release and general availability of a new maintenance update to the stable NetworkManager 1.2 series of the open source network connection manager software for GNU/Linux distributions. NetworkManager is the most used network connection manager, adopted by almost all Linux-based operating systems on the market, and NetworkManager 1.2.6 is now the most advanced release of the 1.2 stable series, coming four months after the NetworkManager 1.2.4 update to fix a few bugs and regressions reported by users since then.
  • GNOME loves to cook
    With the upcoming 20th birthday of GNOME next year, some of us thought that we should make another attempt at this application, maybe as a birthday gift to all of GNOME. Shortly after GUADEC, I got my hands on some existing designs and started to toy around with implementing them over a few weekends and evenings. The screenshots in this post show how far I got since then.

today's howtos

Linux Foundation: Blockchain and Automotive Grade Linux

  • Linux Foundation’s Blockchain Collective Hyperledger Hits 100 Members
    Hyperledger aims to enable organizations to build robust, industry-specific applications, platforms and hardware systems to support their individual business transactions by creating an enterprise grade, open source distributed ledger framework and code base.
  • The Blockchain Milestone You May Have Missed
  • Sasken becomes member of Automotive Grade Linux
    Sasken Communication Technologies Ltd has announced its membership with Automotive Grade Linux as its bronze member. This will enable Sasken to provide solutions to customers on Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). Sasken will provide product development and system integration services for automotive customers spanning in-vehicle infotainment (IVI), instrument cluster, heads-up display and telematics.