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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Intel, Mesa, Wayland and Bosch Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:21pm
Story Software: Nuclide, QEMU, Mailspring, GNOME Calendar and To Do, LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:18pm
Story Red Hat: OpenShift Container Platform and Financial News Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:16pm
Story Tizen News Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:14pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:13pm
Story The Latest Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:12pm
Story Security: Boeing 757, Security Education Companion, Kaspersky 'Damage Control' and FUD Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 10:09pm
Story Firefox Quantum Raves Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 9:33pm
Story US Government Embrace of FOSS in the Pentagon Roy Schestowitz 16/11/2017 - 9:16pm

MINIX's creator would have liked to know Intel was using it

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OS

When Andrew S. Tanenbaum created the educational, open-source operating system MINIX, he did it to teach operating system principles to his students at Amsterdam's Vrije Universiteit and to readers of his classic textbook, Operating Systems Design and Implementation. MINIX would become Linux's forefather. Tanenbaum knew that. What Tanenbaum didn't know was Intel would take MINIX and embed it within its CPUs for almost a decade.

As Tanenbaum wrote in an open letter: "Thanks for putting a version of MINIX inside the ME-11 management engine chip used on almost all recent desktop and laptop computers in the world. I guess that makes MINIX the most widely used computer operating system in the world, even more than Windows, Linux, or MacOS. And I didn't even know until I read a press report about it."

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OSS: TensorFlow, Serial, Deloitte Report, CUPS

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OSS
  • What is the TensorFlow machine intelligence platform?

    TensorFlow is an open source software library for numerical computation using data-flow graphs. It was originally developed by the Google Brain Team within Google's Machine Intelligence research organization for machine learning and deep neural networks research, but the system is general enough to be applicable in a wide variety of other domains as well. It reached version 1.0 in February 2017, and has continued rapid development, with 21,000+ commits thus far, many from outside contributors. This article introduces TensorFlow, its open source community and ecosystem, and highlights some interesting TensorFlow open sourced models.

    TensorFlow is cross-platform. It runs on nearly everything: GPUs and CPUs—including mobile and embedded platforms—and even tensor processing units (TPUs), which are specialized hardware to do tensor math on. They aren't widely available yet, but we have recently launched an alpha program.

  • Twitter Introduces Serial: an Open Source Library for Serialization

    UI smoothness in Android is something that gets brought up from time to time as it can be really easy for the average user to notice what is commonly referred to as jank. This is quite often noticed when scrolling through a list of items and Twitter noticed that serializing and deserializing data both to and from the database using the standard Android Externalizable classes took up about 15% of the UI thread time. The team took some time to optimize this issue and today they’ve announced Serial — a new, open source library for serialization.

  • Deloitte Report: Over 26,000 Blockchain Projects Began in 2016

    More than 26,000 new projects related to blockchain were created on code repository GitHub last year, according to data collected by Deloitte.

    For its new report – titled "Evolution of Blockchain Technology: Insights from the GitHub Platform" and published today – the professional services firm drew information from the development platform, which plays home to the code for over 86,000 blockchain initiatives, including major projects like bitcoin.

  • CUPS relicensed to Apache v2

    Apple has let it be known that the CUPS printing system will, as of version 2.3, switch from GPLv2 to the Apache License. This change is possible because Apple requires that contributors sign a contributor agreement [PDF] giving joint ownership of any copyrights to Apple.

Ubuntu 18.04 Daily Builds Now Available to Download

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 18.04 daily builds are now available to download. Their availability comes as the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' development cycle gets in to gear.

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The Definitive OpenStack Map

Filed under
Server
OSS

When OpenStack launched in 2010, there were only two projects at the time: Nova compute and Swift storage. Over the last seven years, OpenStack has gotten significantly larger and more complicated, with many different projects that are all part of the open-source cloud platform effort.

In a session at the OpenStack Summit in Sydney, Australia on Nov. 8, Thierry Carrez, VP of Engineering at the OpenStack Foundation, detailed a new effort to help map the OpenStack landscape.

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Red Hat News and Tools

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Red Hat

Pseudo-Open Source and Openwashing

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OSS

LWN Coverage From Realtime Summit, Kernel Summit, GStreamer Conference and More

Filed under
Linux
  • The state of the realtime union

    The 2017 Realtime Summit was held October 21 at Czech Technical University in Prague to discuss all manner of topics related to realtime Linux. Nearly two years ago, a collaborative project was formed with the goal of mainlining the realtime patch set. At the summit, project lead Thomas Gleixner reported on the progress that has been made and the plans for the future.

  • The 2017 Kernel and Maintainers Summits

    The 2017 Kernel and Maintainers Summits were held in Prague, Czechia, in late October, co-located with the Open-Source Summit Europe. As usual, LWN was there, and has put together coverage of the topics that were discussed at these meetings.

    The format of the Kernel Summit was changed significantly for this year. The bulk of the schedule has been moved into an completely open set of talks that ran alongside the rest of the OSS tracks; as a result, the attendance at these discussions was larger than in past years and included more people outside of the core kernel community. The invitation-only discussion has been made much smaller (about 30 core maintainers) and turned into a half-day event.

  • Another attempt to address the tracepoint ABI problem

    Tracepoints provide a great deal of visibility into the inner workings of the kernel, which is both a blessing and a curse. The advantages of knowing what the kernel is doing are obvious; the disadvantage is that tracepoints risk becoming a part of the kernel's ABI if applications start to depend on them. The need to maintain tracepoints could impede the ongoing development of the kernel. Ways of avoiding this problem have been discussed for years; at the 2017 Kernel Summit, Steve Rostedt talked about yet another scheme.

    The risk of creating a new ABI has made some maintainers reluctant to add instrumentation to their parts of the kernel, he said. They might be willing to add new interfaces to provide access to specific information but, in the absence of tools that use this information, it is hard to figure out which information is needed or what a proper interface would be. The solution might be to adopt an approach that is similar to the staging tree, where not-ready-for-prime-time drivers can go until they are brought up to the necessary level of quality.

  • Restartable sequences and ops vectors

    Some technologies find their way into the kernel almost immediately; others need to go through multiple iterations over a number of years first. Restartable sequences, a mechanism for lockless concurrency control in user space, fall into the latter category. At the 2017 Kernel Summit, Mathieu Desnoyers discussed yet another implementation of this concept — but this one may not be the last word either.

    The core idea behind restartable sequences has not changed. An application defines a special region of code that, it is hoped, will run without interruption. This code performs some operation of interest on a per-CPU data structure that can be committed with a single instruction at the end. For example, it may prepare to remove an item from a list, with the final instruction setting a pointer that actually effects this change and makes it visible to other threads running on the same CPU. If the thread is preempted in the middle of this work, it may contend with another thread working on the same data structure. In this case, the kernel will cause the thread to jump to an abort sequence once it runs again; the thread can then clean up and try again (the "restart" part of the name). Most of the time, though, preemption does not happen, and the restartable sequence will implement a per-CPU, atomic operation at high speed.

  • Kernel regression tracking, part 1

    The kernel development community has run for some years without anybody tracking regressions; that changed one year ago when Thorsten Leemhuis stepped up to the task. Two conversations were held on the topic at the 2017 Kernel and Maintainers summits in Prague; this article covers the first of those, held during the open Kernel-Summit track.

    Leemhuis begin by pointing out that he started doing this work even though he does not work for a Linux company; he is, instead, a journalist for the largest computer magazine in Germany. He saw a mention of the gap that was left after Rafael Wysocki stopped tracking regressions, and thought that he might be a good fit for the job. This work is being done in his spare time. When he started, he had thought that the job would be difficult and frustrating; in reality, it turned out to be even worse than he expected.

  • Improving printk()

    When a kernel developer wants to communicate a message to user space, be it for debugging or to report a serious problem with the system, the venerable printk() function is usually the tool of choice. But, as Steve Rostedt (accompanied by Petr Mladek and Sergey Senozhatsky) noted during a brief session at the 2017 Kernel Summit, printk() has not aged well. In particular, it can affect the performance of the system as a whole; the roots of that problem and a possible solution were discussed, but a real solution will have to wait for the appearance of the code.

  • GStreamer: state of the union

    The annual GStreamer conference took place October 21-22 in Prague, (unofficially) co-located with the Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The GStreamer project is a library for connecting media elements such as sources, encoders and decoders, filters, streaming endpoints, and output sinks of all sorts into a fully customizable pipeline. It offers cross-platform support, a large set of plugins, modern streaming and codec formats, and hardware acceleration as some of its features. Kicking off this year's conference was Tim-Philipp Müller with his report on the last 12 months of development and what we can look forward to next.

  • Using eBPF and XDP in Suricata

    Much software that uses the Linux kernel does so at comparative arms-length: when it needs the kernel, perhaps for a read or write, it performs a system call, then (at least from its point of view) continues operation later, with whatever the kernel chooses to give it in reply. Some software, however, gets pretty intimately involved with the kernel as part of its normal operation, for example by using eBPF for low-level packet processing. Suricata is such a program; Eric Leblond spoke about it at Kernel Recipes 2017 in a talk entitled "eBPF and XDP seen from the eyes of a meerkat".

Ubuntu 17.10 - unhappy remarriage

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 17.10 is a new operating system not just because it was released very recently, in October 2017. It is also the first operating system from Canonical since it reverted from Unity to the GNOME desktop environment as default. It was GNOME 2 in use at the divorce time, and now it is GNOME 3 after the re-marriage.

Linux notes from DarkDuck has already reviewed the GNOME version of Ubuntu, when Unity was still in place. There is also a quick screenshot-style review of Ubuntu 17.10, but it is now time to get a more in-depth look into this operating system.

Read more

GeckoLinux Beta Does openSuse Better

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
SUSE

GeckoLinux is an ideal option for switching to a new distro experience. I particularly like how the Cinnamon desktop works. Since I favor the Cinnamon environment in Linux Mint, changing over to GeckoLinux came with no difficulties. All the settings and features played out as expected.

Kudos to the developer for making GeckoLinux such a solid alternative computing platform. I did not expect a developing early beta to be so glitch-free.

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Linux Media Server with Kodi

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News

Today, we’re going to look at a different approach by setting up a Linux media server with Kodi. The Kodi media player, formerly known as XBMC, allows its users to have a big screen media server experience that looks just a great on the small screen as well. Kodi works great with Android and provides a great viewing experience in a web browser.

Graphics: RADV, VC5 Gallium3D, Radeon

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Canonical's Mir Patches Are Breaking RADV With Stock Mesa On Ubuntu

    If you have been trying to use the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver that's packaged for Ubuntu but find it not working, chances are it's caused by Canonical's patches for Mir support.

    RADV developer David Airlie of Red Hat today sent out a notice that Canonical's Mir patches in their Mesa packages are breaking the RADV driver. Ubuntu isn't shipping Vulkan drivers by default yet but ANV and RADV can be easily obtained on Ubuntu Linux systems via sudo apt install mesa-vulkan-drivers for the RADV/ANV drivers built against their stock version of Mesa.

  • VC5 Gallium3D OpenGL Driver Is Starting To Get Fit

    Broadcom's Eric Anholt has remained busy in bringing up the VC5 Gallium3D driver.

    Anholt has added occlusion query support to this driver for next-gen Broadcom graphics hardware as well as improving the debugging output, fixing some crashes, and fixing other OpenGL functionality with this driver. It's been a busy time for him in bringing up this new driver stack as well as continuing to maintain the VC4 driver that continues to be most notably used by the current range of Raspberry Pi ARM boards.

  • More RADV Radeon Vulkan Optimizations Are In The Works

    We are just one week into November and already there are a number of patches volleyed onto the mailing list for continuing to optimize the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver.

  • Radeon VCN Encode Support For RadeonSI Gallium3D

    Earlier this year patches were posted and merged for VCN video decode support with RadeonSI/Gallium3D while now patches are coming from AMD for wiring up VCN video encoding support.

    VCN is a new media block with the upcoming Raven Ridge (Zen+Vega) APUs for both video encode and decode. In the past there was UVD for video decoding and VCE for video encoding while now VCN offers both multimedia encode/decode unified functionality via this new implementation. As mentioned, the VCN video decode bits are already in Mesa while the video encode pieces are now under review.

Free Software/Games, Proprietary and Sales

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Five Desktop Environments, Updated KDE Plasma 5, and GNOME News

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Linux Desktop Roundup | A Look at Five Desktop Environments

    Here are my thoughts on KDE Plasma, GNOME, Cinnamon, MATE and XFCE.

    Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.

  • Plasma 5.11.3

    Tuesday, 7 November 2017. Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.11.3. Plasma 5.11 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

  • GtkSourceView fundraising – September/October report

    I’ve launched two months ago a fundraising for the GtkSourceView library. I intend to write a report every two months, so that you can follow what’s going on in that project, and at the same occasion I can explain in more details some facets of the fundraising.

  • Closures with Async Operations

    Way back in 2011 people were discussing usage of modern GCC features like __attribute__((cleanup())). A few years later it found it’s way into our API’s in GLib with one small caveat, only GCC/Clang support (so no MSVC/Xlc/SunProC). Since I couldn’t care less about MSVC I’ve been using it for years (and really Microsoft, you could contribute more to the mental health of open source programmers by modernizing MSVC).

Orange and Red Hat, Bodhi 3 in Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Orange and Red Hat Join Forces to Spearhead Network Virtualization Innovation

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it is collaborating with Orange, a major multinational telecom operator, to build a modern infrastructure for an agile, responsive network aimed at bringing innovations to customers more quickly and scaling out services dynamically. They are collaborating in open source community projects to accelerate technology innovation in network virtualization, while Orange is using Red Hat OpenStack Platform for its network functions virtualization infrastructure (NFVi) deployments.

  • Stock Under Review: Looking at the Levels for Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Bodhi 3

    Bodhi 3.0.0 was released and deployed to production a few weeks ago, but I wanted to give it the dignity of a blog post since it is a pretty significant milestone in the project's history. Bodhi 3.0.0 is the first Bodhi release that fully supports a non-RPM content type with the addition of the ability to mash modules.

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Uber Made Its Homegrown AI Language Open Source, but Not Entirely out of Altruism

    Uber’s artificial-intelligence lab is less than a year old, but researchers there have already built their own programming language for AI applications—and now they’re releasing it for anyone to use. Quite a generous move for a company known more for its hard-nosed business tactics than for handing out in-house innovations to potential competitors.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 10 compelling stats

    How quickly has Kubernetes’ popularity soared? By most accounts, very quickly. Earlier this year, Cloud Native Computing Foundation executive director Dan Kohn penned a blog post that dug into that claim. People regularly tout Kubernetes as one of the highest velocity projects ever in open source history: Does the data back it up?

    As Kohn found, there may not be a single definitive metric, but they all point in the same conclusion: “You can pick your preferred statistic, such as that Kubernetes is in the top 0.00006% of the projects on GitHub,” Kohn wrote. “I prefer to just think of it as one of the fastest moving projects in the history of open source.”

  • HyperLedger – The Linux Foundation’s Blockchain Framework for Business

    Blockchain development is a novelty in the tech world, but has been around long enough to see platforms such as Ethereum give birth to a myriad of decentralized applications. These dApps aim to solve some of the world’s problems, challenges, or to create new marketplaces.

    Hyperledger is a blockchain project started by the Linux Foundation in January of 2016 as an enterprise-level development framework. This open-source collaboration has attracted the support of many leaders across various industries that want to utilize blockchain technology to facilitate interconnectivity between businesses.

  • The Open-Source Model And Wall Street
  • Open Source Machine Learning: Open Source Dominates Preferred ML and AI Tools and Frameworks

    Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies are being developed and adopted at a rapid pace. This area has become a hot topic in 2017. Interestingly, many of the more prominent tools are Open Source. The technologies are being used with a wide variety of applications, like search, data mining, spam detection, character recognition, autonomous vehicles, online recommendations

    Many of those Open Source tools offer a Python interface to allow developers to jump in quickly. For example, there are core libraries like NumPy, SciPy and SciKit. Keras is a Deep Learning library and TensorFlow is Google’s Open Source Machine Learning tool.

  • Global Application Modernization Services Market 2017-2022 - Open-Source Technology Paving the Way for Untapped Possibilities
  • Service providers use NFV open source to innovate the network

    With NFV open source, service providers can push network innovation and reduce network costs. But service providers will need to adjust to a new open source culture.

  • Open Source Initiative Announces DigitalOcean Corporate Sponsorship

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), dedicated to increasing the awareness and adoption of open source software, is delighted to welcome DigitalOcean as a Premium Sponsor. DigitalOcean, a cloud services platform designed for developers, will provide both financial support and hosting for several OSI community-driven services.

    A Forbes' Cloud 100 company, DigitalOcean's active engagement and investment in open source software highlights how today's most innovative and successful companies have recognized the value of, and opportunities within, open communities of collaboration. The company regularly sponsors open source related MeetUps and Hackathons—including their popular "Hacktoberfest", develops tutorials on open source technologies and techniques, maintains and contributes to a number of open source projects, and of course offers hosting to open source projects and foundations.

  • Highlights from the fifth annual SeaGL conference

    The fifth annual Seattle GNU/Linux Conference (better known as SeaGL), held Oct. 6–7 at Seattle Central College, was again a great event. Seattle even rolled out the welcome committee for us with penguins on the train and geek-oriented tagging posted around town.

  • R / Finance 2018 Call for Papers

    The tenth (!!) annual annual R/Finance conference will take in Chicago on the UIC campus on June 1 and 2, 2018. Please see the call for papers below (or at the website) and consider submitting a paper.

    We are once again very excited about our conference, thrilled about who we hope may agree to be our anniversary keynotes, and hope that many R / Finance users will not only join us in Chicago in June -- and also submit an exciting proposal.

    So read on below, and see you in Chicago in June!

  • Juniper Integrates AppFormix into Contrail Cloud for OpenStack

    At the OpenStack Summit in Sydney, Australia, Juniper announced multiple enhancements to its Contrail Cloud Software Defined Networking (SDN) platform. Among the enhancements are integrated AppFormix visibility capabilities and integrated support for Red Hat's Ceph Storage platform.

  • From imaging neurons to understanding space - what's happening in science with OpenStack?

     

    Scientists are increasingly turning to the open source infrastructure to support the enormous data their experiments yield

  • Stressed about serverless lock-in? Don't be [Ed: Mac Asay continues to promote dangerous buzzwords like "serverless" and denies the fact it's all just lock-in]
  • How to Monetize an Open Source Project [Ed: Engaging Steven Grandchamp from Microsoft as though he's a FOSS expert?!]

Copyleft and Licensing

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • FSFE makes copyrights computer readable

    The Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) is proud to release its next version of our REUSE practices designed to make computers understand software copyrights and licenses.

    The REUSE practices help software developers make simple additions to license headers which make it easier for a computer to determine what license applies to the various parts of a programs source code. By following the REUSE practices, software developers can ensure their intent to license software under a particular license is understood and more readily adhered to.

    Together with the updated practices, which mostly clarify and make explicit some points, the FSFE is also releasing a set of developer tools and examples which show the REUSE practices in action. Three example repositories, together with an example walkthrough of the process used to make the cURL project REUSE compliant, are complemented with a simple tool to validate whether a program is REUSE compliant.

  • Apple Will No Longer Be Developing CUPS Under The GPL

    One decade after Apple bought out CUPS as the de facto printing system for Unix-like operating systems, they are changing the code license.

    The CUPS Common UNIX Printing System up to now had been developed under the GPLv2 license while now Apple will be switching it to the Apache 2.0 software license.

  • Software Freedom Law Center and Conservancy

    There’s been quite a bit of interest recently about the petition by Software Freedom Law Center to cancel the Software Freedom Conservancy’s trademark. A number of people have asked my views on it, so I thought I’d write up a quick blog on my experience with SFLC and Conservancy both during my time as Debian Project Leader, and since.

    It’s clear to me that for some time, there’s been quite a bit of animosity between SFLC and Conservancy, which for me started to become apparent around the time of the large debate over ZFS on Linux. I talked about this in my DebConf 16 talk, which fortunately was recorded (ZFS bit from 8:05 to 17:30).

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

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