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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft Copying Free/Libre Software Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 11:01am
Story Fuchsia Friday: ‘Machina’ brings support for running Linux on top of Fuchsia Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 9:06am
Story GNU/Linux on Google's Chromebooks and Creator Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 9:01am
Story Kernel and Graphics: RISC-V, Intel, Wayland and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 8:44am
Story Server: HPC, Docker, and Loss of Control in Age of 'Cloud', Kubernetes etc. Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 8:40am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 8:20am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/06/2018 - 12:23am
Story Debian Is Looking For Help Coming Up With The Artwork For 10.0 Buster Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 11:19pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 11:15pm
Story Analysts Expect 23% Growth in Red Hat's 1st Quarter Earnings (and More Financial News) Roy Schestowitz 15/06/2018 - 11:13pm

28-Way Linux CPU/System Comparison From Old To New

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

This week have been various unique and extra articles and benchmarks for commemorating the Phoronix 14th birthday. The latest of these fun articles is taking a look back at how various CPUs over the years compare to today's Intel Core and AMD Ryzen offerings.

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Also: A Revived Linux Driver To Be Attempted For The ATI RAGE 128

GeckoLinux updates all ROLLING and STATIC spins

Filed under
Development
Linux
News
SUSE

The GeckoLinux project is pleased to release updated spins of both ROLLING and STATIC editions. GeckoLinux spins are based on the openSUSE distribution, with a focus on polish and out-of-the-box usability on the desktop. A large variety of customized desktop options are available in STATIC (based on openSUSE Leap) and ROLLING (based on openSUSE Tumbleweed) editions. After installation to the hard disk, a GeckoLinux system will continue to receive updates from the openSUSE and Packman infrastructures. An installed system can even be upgraded smoothly to future openSUSE releases while at the same time retaining its unique GeckoLinux configuration.


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World’s Fastest Supercomputer Running GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Move Over, China: U.S. Is Again Home to World's Speediest Supercomputer [Ed: In Top 500 everything runs GNU/Linux]
  • IBM's world-class Summit supercomputer gooses speed with AI abilities
  • The US again has the world's most powerful supercomputer
  • The US Again Has World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer

    Plenty of people around the world got new gadgets Friday, but one in Eastern Tennessee stands out. Summit, a new supercomputer unveiled at Oak Ridge National Lab is, unofficially for now, the most powerful calculating machine on the planet. It was designed in part to scale up the artificial intelligence techniques that power some of the recent tricks in your smartphone.

    America hasn’t possessed the world’s most powerful supercomputer since June 2013, when a Chinese machine first claimed the title. Summit is expected to end that run when the official ranking of supercomputers, from an organization called Top500, is updated later this month.

    [...]

    Summit has nearly 28,000 graphics processors made by Nvidia, alongside more than 9,000 conventional processors from IBM. Such heavy use of graphic chips is unusual for a supercomputer, and it should enable breakthroughs in deploying machine learning on tough scientific problems, says Thomas Zacharia, director of Oak Ridge National Lab. “We set out to build the world’s most powerful supercomputer,” he says, “but it's also the world’s smartest supercomputer.”

  • IBM and the DoE launch the world’s fastest supercomputer

    IBM and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) today unveiled Summit, the department’s newest supercomputer. IBM claims that Summit is currently the world’s “most powerful and smartest scientific supercomputer” with a peak performance of a whopping 200,000 trillion calculations per second. That performance should put it comfortably at the top of the Top 500 supercomputer ranking when the new list is published later this month. That would also mark the first time since 2012 that a U.S.-based supercomputer holds the top spot on that list.

    [...]

    IBM was the general contractor for Summit and the company collaborated with Nvidia, RedHat and InfiniBand networking specialists Mellanox on delivering the new machine.

Observing and Replacing GitHub

Filed under
Development
Microsoft
  • GitHub’s New CEO Did a Reddit AMA, This is What he Said

    There is a growing concern that Microsoft may seek to bloat the service with add-ons, feature creep, and integrations with their own services, like Azure and LinkedIn.

    Is that likely?

  • 5 Github Alternatives

    Although GitHub is the most used platform for storing open source projects on the Internet but being acquired by Microsoft, the open source community may like to prefer the alternatives. So we have other very interesting options that we recommend to know in order to decide which one to publish and store your own creations and adaptations in the cloud.

  • Three Takes On Microsoft Acquiring Github

    But, as someone who believes in the value of reinvention and innovation among the tech industry, it's not necessarily great to see successful mid-tier companies just gobbled up by giants. It happens -- and perhaps it clears the field for something fresh and new. Perhaps it even clears the field for that utopic git-driven world that Ford envisions. But, in the present-tense, it's at least a bit deflating to think that a very different, and very powerful, approach to the way people collaborate and code... ends up in Microsoft's universe.

    And, as a final note on these three pieces: this is why we should seek out and promote people who actually understand technology and business in understanding what is happening in the technology world. The Guardian piece is laughable, because it appears to be written by someone with such a surface-level understanding of open source of free software that it comes off as utter nonsense. But the pieces by Ford and Thompson actually help add to our understanding of the news, while providing insightful takes on it. The Guardian (and others) should learn from that.

  • Mailing lists vs Github

    The alternative method is the developer mailing list. It arose in the late eighties to early nineties, and predates the popularity of the web browser. But far from being a mere historical curiosity, the discussion list is still the primary method of development in many important open source projects, from databases to operating systems to web browsers.

    In this article I’ll carefully compare the use of mailing lists with code collaboration web sites such as Github. I’ll do my best to present the pros and cons of each, so that projects assessing the two can make an informed decision.

How to Use GNOME Shell’s Secret Screen Recorder

Filed under
GNOME
HowTos

So you want to record your Ubuntu desktop, but you don’t know which desktop screen recorder to use?

Well, have you considered not using one at all?

Don’t look at me strangely: I promise this makes sense.

You’ve likely seen videos on YouTube where people share a screencast of their Linux desktops. Perhaps you want to join the fun. Well, you can, and you don’t need any special tools or separate screen recorder apps to do it.

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Jetson based embedded vision kit has three 4K cameras

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

E-con’s “e-CAM120_TRICUTX2” is a camera system powered by a Linux-driven Jetson TX1 or TX2 module that features three 13-megapixel, [email protected] cameras via 4-lane MIPI-CSI-2 interfaces.

Last September, E-con Systems launched an e-CAM30_HEXCUTX2 system with six 3.4-megapixel, HD cameras. Now it has followed up with an e-CAM120_TRICUTX2 camera rig with only three cameras but each with higher [email protected] resolution via 13-megapixel technology.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Get 13 Linux & Programming Stickers in $1 from Unixstickers (Includes Free Shipping World Wide)

    If you’ve been collecting stickers/goodies on UNIX & other programming languages that you love, Unixstickers should not require an introduction. Italy based e-commerce, Unixstickers has been the one-stop shop for getting Linux and programming stickers, magnets, mugs and other merchandises. Unixstickers has been the official merchandise vendor for a number of open source projects and it donated part of the profit to a number of open source projects.

  • Our Immodest Ambitions

    We should be for Linux what Make is for the maker movement.

  • Kubernetes at 4 Years Old Continues to Improve Cloud Native Technology

    On June 6, 2014, Joe Beda published the first code commit for the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration project. Four years later, Kubernetes has become a core enabler for cloud native technology and benefits from the support of all the major public cloud providers and many major enterprise IT vendors as well.

    When Beda made the first code commit, he was an engineer at Google. In 2018, Beda is now the co-founder and CTO of Heptio, which provides commercial support and services for Kubernetes. In a video interview with eWEEK, Beda discusses the scope of Kubernetes, what it is and what it isn't as well as providing some insight into what's coming next.

  • Tracking Mesa's VirGL OpenGL Features

    It's now much easier tracking the state of VirGL that allows for OpenGL acceleration within guest virtual machines by passing on the rendering calls to the system's host OpenGL driver via Mesa and the virglrenderer library.

    VirGL has come along a lot since its debut three years ago, but even with a host OpenGL driver having OpenGL 4.5, the VirGL code and renderer library aren't yet ready for those latest OpenGL 4.x capabilities.

  • Comparing files and directories with the diff and comm Linux commands
  • [Slackware] Security updates for Java and Flash
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in May 2018
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E14 – The Fourteenth Goldfish - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we review the KDE Slimbook II, experiment with Linux on the Hades Canyon NUC and play some Track Mania Nations Forever. We also bring you some command line love and go over your feedback.

  •  

  • Google freezes Android P: Get your shoes on, tire-kicking devs

    With Google freezing the Android P APIs yesterday, both major mobile platforms have shown their hand for 2018. The freeze comes as Google released "Beta 2", which is really the third Developer Preview release of Android P issued so far.

    The API freeze means developers can now compile and submit apps compatible with Android P to the Google Play Store.

    This is the first year in which Google has really invited a range of enthusiasts to come in and kick the tires. Previous Android previews only ran on Google devices, but this year a number of other devices - from Nokia, Sony, Xiaomi, OnePlus, Essential and Vivo - can also get a glimpse of code before it is baked into manufacturers' ROMs. These images will be pushed out shortly.

  • BlackBerry Key2 Launches with Touch-Enabled QWERTY Keyboard, Dual Cameras

    BlackBerry unveiled on Thursday the BlackBerry Key2 smartphone during a live event hosted in New York City, the United States, which is currently live streamed on YouTube.

    Equipped with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 processor and 6GB of RAM, the BlackBerry Key2 smartphone is powered by Google's Android 8.1 Oreo mobile operating system, has a long-lasting 3,500 mAh Li-Ion battery with Quick Charge 3.0 support, and comes with either 64GB or 128GB internal storage that can be expanded to up to 256GB with a microSD memory card.

GSoC Work on KDE and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • GSoC’18 Week 2 && 3

    Thanks to Timothée Giet, for providing me the icons of different tools. We’ll be updating the remaining icons soon.

    We noticed some bugs with the default color picker, and decided to create our own Color picker, consisting of three bars –> Hue, Saturation and lightness to select the required color. This was a little difficult task for me at the beginning but finally managed to create this with the help of my mentors and resources on the internet.

  •  

  • Improving the reliability and usability of KStars

    The goal of my GSOC project to continue the improvements over the codebase what was started previous year. Improving the reliability and bring modern C++ features. I have the following goals for the first period to make KStars better:

  • GSoC 2018: Filter Infrastructure

    This summer I’m working on librsvg, a GNOME library for rendering SVG files, particularly on porting the SVG filter effects from C to Rust. That involves separating the code for different filters from one huge C file into individual files for each filter, and then porting the filter rendering infrastructure and the individual filters.

    Thankfully, in the large C file the code for different filters was divided by comment blocks, so several vim macros later I was done with the not so exciting splitting part.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Vue Vixens

    A new program, project and community was launched this year with a mission to introduce women to the open-source JavaScript framework Vue. While there are a variety of framework communities for women in the programming industry such as Django Girls, Rails Bridge, and ng-Girls, Jen Looper, developer advocate at Progress, saw a lack of community in the Vue.js space. Out of that lack of community, Vue Vixens was born.

  • OSI Welcoming Software Heritage
  • Google Open Sources Real-Time Visualisation Library Developed by Intern

    Google yesterday open sourced an improved algorithm for tSNE (a machine learning algorithm for data visualisation), developed by an intern, for its acclaimed machine learning framework Tensorflow, enabling interactive visual experiences when working with large datasets.  

    The tech giant posted on its Google Plus page for ‘Google AI’: “Some new research from an intern in our Zürich office shows an approach to tSNE that allows real-time interactive visualization of large, high-dimensional datasets by leveraging GPU capabilities through WebGL. Oh, and it’s open source too! Check it out”.  

  •  

  • Intel MPX Support Removed From GCC 9

    Support for Intel Memory Protection Extensions (MPX) is now pretty much dead on Linux.

    As a follow-up to the article in April of GCC looking to remove MPX support from their compiler with Intel no longer maintaining that portion of the code and MPX being deprecated already, today the commit went in deleting all of the MPX support in GCC.

  • How to defend your encrypted emails against prying eyes

    In May, a draft technical paper published at efail.de recommended that people stop using GPG plugins to encrypt their email. At the same time, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) raised the alarm about seemingly new vulnerabilities in GPG (GNU Privacy Guard), echoing the paper's cautionary recommendations. Others further reduced this recommendation to a simple shorthand: stop encrypting your email, because it isn't safe. (EFF has since modified its recommendations, depending on the mail client and GPG plugin you use, and with caveats that match some of the suggestions we'll make here.)

    Much of this information isn't new. The issue isn't a flaw in GPG, and there is no need to panic or discontinue using GPG, including for signing emails or for encrypting and decrypting files outside of your email client. Here are the facts:

    The EFAIL paper describes several methods of attack: "EFAIL abuses active content of HTML emails, for example externally loaded images or styles, to exfiltrate plaintext through requested URLs." The attacker accesses the encrypted emails, "by eavesdropping on network traffic, compromising email accounts, email servers, backup systems or client computers. The emails could even have been collected years ago." The attacker changes the encrypted email, sends it to the recipient, and if the recipient's mail client decrypts that message and automatically loads any external content, or users click on HTML links, the plaintext of the email is visible to the attacker.

  • Interview: Roger Uceda, BCN3D Technologies, ‘being in an open source community multiplies your efforts exponentially’

    Our series to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of RepRap continues with 3D printing insights from BCN3D Technologies.

    Roger Uceda is the founder of BCN3D Technologies, a division of the non-profit CIM-UPC foundation. In 2010, work began on developing a 3D printer at the research lab of the Barcelona Tech university, this project would later grow into the venture known as BCN3D Technologies.

    BCN3D has continued to adhere to Open Source principals by publishing design files for their 3D printers, most recently the BCN3D Sigmax. In this article Roger Uceda gives insights into the beginnings of BCN3D and the benefits of Open Source.

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Microsoft's and Apple's Lies About Free/Open Source Software

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

Software: GNU/Linux, Chrome, and Mozilla/Firefox

Filed under
Google
Software
Moz/FF
  • Read Ebooks Quicker With This Spritz-Like Fast Reading Command Line Software

    Uniread aims at improving your reading speed by using a Spritz-like technique for fast reading. The application uses Node.js, runs on the command line, and it currently supports the EPUB ebook file format.

    According to Spritzinc, when you read "the eye seeks a certain point within the word, which we call the optimal recognition point, or ORP. After your eyes find the ORP, your brain starts to process the meaning of the word that you're viewing".

    They continue to mention that "when reading, only around 20% of your time is spent processing content. The remaining 80% is spent physically moving your eyes from word to word and scanning for the next ORP".

    This is where the Spritz-like technique / software comes in. Using it, you can read the text without moving your eyes and thus, improve your reading speed (thanks to the 80% of time gained from not having to move your eyes and by increasing the speed at which words are being displayed on screen).

  • Linux Release Roundup: Curlew, Cantata & Google Chrome

    Another week, another batch of welcome Linux app updates to round-up — and another one of these rather difficult post intros to write!

    This week we’re taking in updates from a diverse range of apps: from a nifty media converter to a nimble music player, by way of a largely unknown web browser called “Google Chrome”.

    Yes, that was an attempt at sarcasm.

  • Chrome 68 Beta: add to home screen, payment handler, page lifecycle

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 68 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 68 is beta as of June 7, 2018.

  • Chrome 68 Rolls Out In Beta Form

    For those not satisfied by last week's Chrome 67 stable release, Chrome 68 is now available in beta form with the latest and greatest feature work.

  • @media, MathML, and Django 1.11: MDN Changelog for May 2018
  • What is Standup?

    Standup is a system for capturing standup-style posts from individuals making it easier to see what's going on for teams and projects. It has an associated IRC bot standups for posting messages from IRC.

  • Paris, Munich, & Dresden: Help Us Give the Web a Voice!

    In July, our Voice Assistant Team will be in France and Germany to explore trust and technology adoption. We’re particularly interested in how people use voice assistants and how people listen to content like Pocket and podcasts. We would like to learn more how you use technology and how a voice assistant or voice user interface (VUIs) could improve your Internet and open web experiences. We will be conducting a series of in-home interviews and participatory design sessions. No prior voice assistant experience needed!

Programming: GitLab, Perl and PHP

Filed under
Development
  • How Did GitLab Scale Up for the Slashdot Effect? Point and Click
  • pinp 0.0.5: Accomodate pandoc 2.*

    Another maintenance release of our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignettes is getting onto CRAN right now.

  • PHP 7.3.0 alpha 1 Released

    PHP team is glad to announce the release of the first PHP 7.3.0 version, PHP 7.3.0 Alpha 1. This starts the PHP 7.3 release cycle, the rough outline of which is specified in the PHP Wiki.

  • PHP 7.3 Alpha Released With New Features

    F
    PHP 7.3 Alpha 1 is available today as the PHP developers kick off their next release cycle for getting this next version of PHP7 out by the end of 2018.

    PHP developers plan on at least three alphas and three betas to get through August and then at least six release candidates happening every two weeks. After that all happens, PHP developers feel PHP 7.3.0 should be ready for release by the end of November.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Five Free Open Source Testing Tools You Can Trust

Filed under
OSS

Free open source testing tools have never been more popular, necessary or front of mind. Recent news coverage of the open source Kayenta suite of canary testing tools launched by Google and Netflix not only demonstrates that industry has an increasing appetite for automated testing, but also that the need for such tools is far more widely accepted.

There are a few major pitfalls for the unwary when choosing open source testing tools, perhaps the most important being to be clear about is the difference between ‘free’ tools and open source tools, a distinction that often gets muddied. Indeed, there are legions of ‘free’ tools that are not truly open source, which can be an unwelcome discovery – too late – if not checked carefully first.

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Red Hat reaches the Summit – a new top scientific supercomputer

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat just announced its role in bringing a top scientific supercomputer into service in the U.S. Named “Summit” and housed at the Department of Energy’s OAK Ridge National Labs, this system with its 4,608 IBM compute servers is running — you guessed it — Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

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Games: Hyper Ultra Astronautics, Paper Dungeons Crawler and Steam Controller in Linux 4.18

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Updates, MyHeritage, Routers and LinuxForums.org

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • 92 million MyHeritage users had their data quietly swiped

    Email addresses and hashed passwords of more than 92 million MyHeritage users were exposed in a cybersecurity breach on October 26, 2017, the popular genealogy company reported Monday, June 4, 2018.

  • Global Russian-Linked Router Malware Even Worse Than Originally Stated

    Late last month, the FBI announced that hackers working for the Russian government had managed to infect roughly 500,000 routers in 54 countries with a particularly-nasty piece of malware known as VPN Filter. The malware, which infected routers from vendors like Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and certain network-attached storage devices from companies like QNAP, gave attackers the ability to track a victim's internet usage, launch attacks on other networks, and permanently destroy the devices upon command.

  • LinuxForums.org Hack Exposes 276,000 User Accounts

    LinuxForums.org is a free help and support forum for Linux distributions software, and computer hardware, which currently hosts more than 200,000 registered members. The website was launched back in 2001, and in 2008 it changed ownership, now being owned by MAS Media Inc.

    The LinuxForums.org data breach is a consequence of the forums using an old version of vBulletin (version 4.2.2, released back in October 2013), a proprietary Internet forum software. Along with the 276k unique email addresses, usernames, IP addresses and salted MD5 password hashes were also leaked. Using salted MD5 password hashes is a bad idea because... well, MD5 is very fast, so an attacker can try billions of password combinations per second.

  • Change your linuxforums dot org passwords

Fedora 29 To Further Strengthen Crypto Settings

Filed under
Red Hat

One of the latest planned features for Fedora 29 is to update the system-wide cryptography policy.

This latest crypto policy would disable legacy cryptographic protocols like TLS 1.0/1.1 as well as weak Diffie-Hellman key exchange sizes. Basically, disable the old and weak crypto components from being part of the default Fedora 29.

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