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Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:29am
Story GNOME News: GNOME 3.24, Recipes 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:28am
Story Mesa 13.0.6 Graphics Stack Promises Better Vulkan Drivers, over 100 Improvements Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 8:17am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:26am
Story Linux and FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:23am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:22am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:20am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 2:18am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2017 - 1:33am
Story Wine 2.4 Has Fixes for Aliens vs. Predator, The Next BIG Thing, and Nvidia GPUs Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2017 - 9:58pm

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Android

Linux and FOSS Events: Apache, SCaLE 15x, LinuxPlaya, DevAcademy, DevNet

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Keynotes and Sessions for Apache: Big Data
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Full Agenda for ApacheCon™ 2017
  • Apache Conferences, BarCamps, and MeetUps

    The Apache Software Foundation, in conjunction with our friends at the Linux Foundation events team, are proud to announce the schedule for ApacheCon North America - http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apachecon-north-america/program/schedule - and Apache Big Data North America - http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/apache-big-data-north-america/program/schedule

  • SCaLE 15x

    This year was the 15th Annual SCaLE (Southern California Linux Expo) event where I was fortunate enough to both attend and speak at. While this is the 15th year of the, now very well known, conference; it was in fact my first time to attend. I spent majority of my time floating between working the Fedora, Red Hat, and OpenShift booths there in the Expo Hall. I had originally planned to spend more time at the Fedora booth than I did, but the OpenShift crew ended up short staffed because of unexpected travel issues of some of their team members so I filled in the best I could. As expected the interest in containers is at full tilt and people were very interested to see what is going on with OpenShift as it is a Kubernetes distribution with advanced features beyond core Kubernetes, and Kubernetes is easily the most popular container orchestration platform around right now. The Project Atomic Community manager, Josh Berkus was kind enough to lend his Sub-Atomic Cluster (Described in this two-part blog series: Part 1, Part 2) to the booth efforts and that made for some very engaging demos of what OpenShift can accomplish (even though the conference network left something to be desired, but this is nothing new). Over all I think we were able to provide event goers a solid booth destination in their Expo Hall travels.

  • #LinuxPlaya 2017, the Fedora and GNOME fest at the beach!

    Last Saturday in Lima, Peru, a group of students and, Fedora and GNOME lovers have celebrated the event called #LinuxPlaya.

  • The presence of Fedora and GNOME at DevAcademy

    Today, I have been interviewed by Lennon Shimokawa (Founder of DevAcademy) to talk about the Free Software situation in Peru and how to get involved in the GNOME and Fedora project since you are interested to do it! This was the preamble for this season:

  • Call for Speakers: DevNet Create, May 23-24, 2017 in San Francisco

    Do you love to code? Are you a trailblazer in secure app development, IoT or bot app development? Want to share your microservices or container success story? If so, DevNet Create wants you as a speaker at its first annual event May 23-24, 2017, in San Francisco.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • How to make money from open source software

    Talk about starting a business based on open source software and the conversation will inevitably shift to Red Hat. That's because the Linux vendor is a shining example of a company that's making money from an open source product. But how easy is it really to establish an open source startup that makes money? For every success story like Red Hat there are companies like Cyanogen that fail to thrive and projects that are abandoned.

    It's tempting to believe that the Red Hat business model, which is based around selling subscriptions for support to a maintained and tested version of Linux (or a closely related model that offers consultancy and customization to an open source software solution as well support and maintenance), is the most viable way to make money from open source software. But Sam Myers, a principal at Balderton Capital, a technology venture capital company, says that most open source startups are unlikely to succeed using these business models.

  • The grueling emotional labor of an open source maintainer

    Nolan Lawson is burning up the free/open source web with an essay called What it feels like to be an open-source maintainer, where he describes the contradictory and negative experiences of trying to please hundreds of people who are just trying to get his code to work, where the more emotional and technical work he does to make them happy, the more he ends up with.

  • Introduction to gRPC

    The hot new buzz in tech is gRPC. It is a super-fast, super-efficient Remote Procedure Call (RPC) system that will make your microservices talk to each other at lightspeed, or at least that’s what people say. So this article will take a quick look at what it is, and how or when it can fit into your services.

  • Open source technology in enterprise

    With many organisations having moved to more open source adoption, more than 90% admit there are potential or hidden costs in doing so.

    Up to half admit to not taking the different costs of open source into account in their decision-making, such as training, recruiting and replacing employees with essential data science skills.

    [...]

    What is clear are that many organisations see clear benefits from open source and many are already deploying these solutions, with plans to grow their use of open source.

    Respondents listed a number of customer benefits. Almost half believe it can help bring opportunities in terms of a wider range and more personalised products and services. Around four in 10 feel it can help with faster resolution of problems.

  • Chrome 57 arrives with CSS Grid Layout and API improvements
  • Chrome 57 rolling out now to Mac, Windows, and Linux
  • Google Chrome 57 Launches with CSS Grid Layout, Improved "Add to Home" Screen

    Just a few moments ago, Google promoted the Chrome 57 web browser to the stable channel for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    Chrome 57.0.2987.98 is now the newest stable version of the applications, and it looks like it comes with various new features and improvements that have been revealed during its Beta stages of development, such as CSS Grid Layout, an improved "Add to Home" screen, as well as a Media Session API (Application Programming Interface).

  • Firefox 52 kills plugins – except Flash – and runs up a red flag for HTTP

    The Mozilla Foundation has has given the world the fifty-second version of the Firefox browser, complete with some significant changes.

    Most notable is the eviction of plug-ins. The browser will now only run Flash. Anything else reliant on the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) is now verboten. Which means Silverlight, Java and Acrobat are gone, daddy, gone.

  • LLVM 4.0 Compiler Stack Is Getting Prepped For Release

    The LLVM compiler infrastructure stack and Clang C/C++ compiler front-end will see their version 4.0 release within the next few days.

    LLVM/Clang 4.0 has dragged on due to unresolved blockers compared to their targeted release date about two weeks ago, but the good news now that after the additional release candidates, the bugs have been resolved.

  • Indian State of Kerala Saves $58 Million Each Year By Using Free And Open Source Software

    In Kerala, IT became a compulsory subject in 2003. It was followed by the phased adoption of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in 2005. This was done to replace the proprietary software.

Openwashing and Attacks on FOSS

Filed under
OSS

GSoC 2017

Filed under
Google
OSS
  • Netfilter in GSoC 2017

    Great news! The Netfilter project has been elected by Google to be a mentoring organization in this year Google Summer of Code program. Following the pattern of the last years, Google seems to realise and support the importance of this software project in the Linux ecosystem.

  • Over 200 Open Source Orgs Mentoring GSoC 2017

    The list of mentoring organizations for this year's Google Summer of Code has been posted and there's a record number of them. The list includes large and well known projects together with smaller and less familiar ones.

Development News

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Development
  • Open Source Firmware For A Cheap Programmable Power Supply

    A few months ago, someone clued us in on a neat little programmable power supply from the usual Chinese retailers. The DPS5005 is a programmable power supply that takes power from a big AC to DC wall wart and turns it into a tiny bench-top power supply. You can pick one of these things up for about thirty bucks, so if you already have a sufficiently large AC to DC converter you can build a nice 250 Watt power supply on the cheap.

    [Johan] picked up one of these tiny programmable power supplies. His overall impression was positive, but like so many cheap products on AliExpress, there wasn’t a whole lot of polish to the interface. Additionally, the DPS5005 lacked the ability to be controlled over a serial port or WiFi.

  • Secrets of Maintainable Codebases

    You should write maintainable code. I assume people have told you this, at some point. The admonishment is as obligatory as it is vague. So, I’m sure, when you heard this, you didn’t react effusively with, “oh, good idea — thanks!”

    If you take to the internet, you won’t need to venture far to find essays, lists, and stack exchange questions on the subject. As you can see, software developers frequently offer opinions on this particular topic. And I present no exception; I have little doubt that you could find posts about this on my own blog.

  • Facebook Brings HHVM To ARM 64-bit

    It looks like Facebook could be exploring more from ARM servers in their data centers as they have now brought their HHVM PHP implementation to AArch64.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Hardening the LSM API

    The Linux Security Modules (LSM) API provides security hooks for all security-relevant access control operations within the kernel. It’s a pluggable API, allowing different security models to be configured during compilation, and selected at boot time. LSM has provided enough flexibility to implement several major access control schemes, including SELinux, AppArmor, and Smack.

  • Hackers exploit Apache Struts vulnerability to compromise corporate web servers
  • Critical vulnerability under “massive” attack imperils high-impact sites

    The code-execution bug resides in the Apache Struts 2 Web application framework and is trivial to exploit. Although maintainers of the open source project patched the vulnerability on Monday, it remains under attack by hackers who are exploiting it to inject commands of their choice into Struts servers that have yet to install the update, researchers are warning. Making matters worse, at least two working exploits are publicly available.

  • How Safe Are Blockchains? It Depends.

    Blockchain, the distributed ledger technology underlying bitcoin, may prove to be far more valuable than the currency it supports. But it’s only as valuable as it is secure. As we begin to put distributed ledger technology into practice, it’s important to make sure that the initial conditions we’re setting up aren’t setting us up for security issues later on.

  • Three Overlooked Lessons about Container Security

    Last week was an exciting week for me — I’ve just joined container security specialists Aqua Security and spent a couple of days in Tel Aviv getting to know the team and the product. I’m sure I’m learning things that might be obvious to the seasoned security veteran, but perhaps aren’t so obvious to the rest of us! Here are three aspects I found interesting and hope you will too, even if you’ve never really thought about the security of your containerized deployment before:

Gentoo-Based exGENT Linux Distro Gets the "Best Version Ever," Says Developer

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Gentoo

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton announced today, March 9, 2017, the immediate availability of a new build of his Gentoo-based exGENT Linux distribution, which the developer dubbed as the best version ever.

exGENT Build 170309 is now available for those who want to install a Gentoo-based distro in less than 10 minutes. It uses the lightweight Xfce 4.12.1 desktop environment by default and the Linux 4.9.12 kernel. The OS is distributed as a Live DVD designed to run only on 64-bit architectures.

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How Ubuntu is helping to optimize Google Cloud

Filed under
Google
Software
Interviews
Ubuntu

While the products that Ubuntu provides — such as Canonical Livepatch Service and Juju — are well-known in the cloud community, its corporate stance is not as recognized. It’s hoping to change that perception.

“Ubuntu is a very popular [operating system], and we are most dominant in public cloud,” explained Udi Nachmany, vice president of public cloud at Ubuntu.

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KDE Plasma 5.10 Desktop Environment to Ship with Virtual Keyboard on Lock Screen

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KDE

KDE developer Martin Gräßlin published an interesting article on his personal blog to inform the Linux and KDE community about some of the exciting new features coming to the KDE Plasma 5.10 desktop environment later this spring.

The development of KDE Plasma 5.10 is ongoing, and it looks like a Beta release is scheduled for the beginning of the second week of May, on the 11th, when early adopters will be able to get a taste of its upcoming features, including the Folder View mode, which we detailed a couple of weeks ago right here on Softpedia Linux.

Read more

Also: KDE Ships KDE Applications 16.12.3

KDE Applications 16.12.3 Is the Last in the Series, 17.04 Launches on April 20

Black Lab Linux 8.0 Is a Rare Treat

Filed under
Reviews

The latest release of Black Lab Linux, an Ubuntu 16.04-based distribution, adds a Unity desktop option. You will not find Unity offered by any other major -- or nearly any minor -- Linux distributor outside of Ubuntu.

Black Lab Linux 8.0, the consumer version of PC/OpenSystems' flagship distro, also updates several other prominent desktop options.

Black Lab Linux is a general purpose community distribution for home users and small-to-mid-sized businesses. PC/OpenSystems also offers Black Lab Enterprise Linux, a commercial counterpart for businesses that want support services.

Black Lab Linux is an outgrowth of OS4 OpenLinux, a distro the same developers released in 2008. Both the community and the commercial releases could be a great alternative for personal and business users who want to avoid the UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) horrors of installing Linux in a computer bought off the shelf with Microsoft Windows preinstalled.

Black Lab offers its flagship releases with a choice of self or full support, and both come at a price upon launch. However, you can wait 45 days and get the same release with the self-support option for free. Black Lab Linux 8.0 became available for free late last year.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti On Linux: Best Linux Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is NVIDIA's newest, most powerful graphics card for gamers not only on Windows but also under Linux. I only received the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti this morning so here are my initial Linux performance figures for this new high-end Pascal graphics card compared to other NVIDIA and AMD Radeon graphics cards. Linux VR tests, CUDA/OpenCL compute benchmarks, and additional GeForce GTX 1080 Ti results will be published in the days ahead when having more time to spend with this graphics card.

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Mesa 17.1.0 release plan

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Graphics/Benchmarks

A Linux User Reminds Himself Why He Stopped Using Windows

Filed under
Linux

I know: Ubuntu has its problems, too. Nothing's perfect. And for some people, WIndows is just a better fit than Linux.

Still, I admit that I've been happy, in a kind of way, by my frustrations working with Windows. Ever since I switched to Linux, I have always been afraid that Windows will get much better, without my knowledge. Using a recent version of Windows and finding it quite annoying is pleasant affirmation that Linux is still the better option for me.

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Kdenlive 16.12.3 is out

Filed under
KDE

The last release of the 16.12 branch brings a few, but important improvements, like fixing a couple of crashes and avoiding a possible corruption as well as a overnight render bug along with other minor stability improvements. All in all 16.12 was a great release and the best is still to come.

We continue our focused effort in the timeline refactoring which will bring professional grade tools, stay tuned for more info on that soon!

Read more

LibreOffice 5.2.6 Office Suite Officially Released with over 60 Improvements

Filed under
LibO

Italo Vignoli from The Document Foundation (TDF) is informing Softpedia today, March 9, 2017, about the general and immediate availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.2 open-source and cross-platform office suite.

Read more

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • OA Performance Counters Now Being Exposed By Intel's Mesa Driver

    Intel's Mesa driver is exposing additional performance counters now for helping game/application debuggers better profile the performance of their software on Intel HD/Iris Graphics hardware.

    There is now support for OA (Observation Architecture) performance counters via the i965 Mesa DRI driver. The OA performance counters are for Haswell and newer.

  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti On Linux?

    The GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is NVIDIA's new high-end gamer graphics card as a step-up from the previous GTX 1080 flagship. The GTX 1080 Ti is getting ready for release by retailers and, thankfully, NVIDIA did mail out a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti for Linux testing at Phoronix.

  • AMD Sends Out Prep AMDGPU Patches For New GPUs

    In the early hours of today AMD posted a set of 23 AMDGPU patches as "prep patches for new ASICs", which given the timing, is presumably prepping for the Radeon RX VEGA.

    But before getting too excited, there isn't any new GPU support code as part of these 23 patches that touch several hundred lines of code. These patches are just prepping the driver infrastructure for being able to handle AMD's new GPUs but without actually adding in any new support at this time.

  • Libinput Updates For Early March

    Peter Hutterer has released minor updates to libinput as well as the X.Org xf86-input-libinput components.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?
    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report
    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)
  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO
    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay
    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week. Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework
    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.
  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed
    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.
  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here
    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.
  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)
    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published
    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.
  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan
    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.
  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"
    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil. Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.