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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux and Linux Foundation: Wipro, Torvalds, Zemlin and Kees Cook Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 9:34am
Story Desktop: Lenovo and StationX Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 9:32am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 9:31am
Story Is Open Source Secure? Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 9:08am
Story Games: Swim Out, Mesa, Psychonauts, SteamWorld Dig 2, Ravenfield Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:36am
Story KDE: Plasma Accessibility, Randa Report, KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0, and PureOS Roy Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:34am
Story How an open source tool is helping hurricane victims Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:26am
Story Initial Benchmarks Of The AMD EPYC 7601 On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:21am
Story Linux drone controller has HDMI input and long-range WiFi Rianne Schestowitz 15/09/2017 - 7:09am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/09/2017 - 10:45pm

BSD: LLVM 5.0.0, Android NDK, FreeBSD/TrueOS

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Development
BSD

     
     

  • LLVM 5.0.0 Release

    This release is the result of the community's work over the past six months, including: C++17 support, co-routines, improved optimizations, new compiler warnings, many bug fixes, and more.

  • LLVM 5.0 Released With C++17 Support, Ryzen Scheduler, AMDGPU Vega & Much More

    After delays pushed its release back by about one month, LLVM 5.0 was just released a few minutes ago along with its associated sub-projects like the Clang 5.0 C/C++ compiler.

    LLVM 5.0 features a number of improvements to the ARM and MIPS targets, greater support for the POWER ISA 3.0 in the PowerPC target, the initial AMD Ryzen (znver1) scheduler support (already improved in LLVM 6.0 SVN), support for Intel Goldmont CPUs, greater AVX-512 support, improved Silvermont/Sandybridge/Jaguar schedulers, and initial Radeon Vega (GFX9) support within the AMDGPU target.

  • Android NDK r16: Developers Should Start Using LLVM's libc++ With GCC On The Way Out

    Google has announced the availability today of the Android Native Development Kit (NDK) Release 16. This release is worth mentioning in that Google is now encouraging developers to start using libc++ as their C++ standard library.

    Moving forward, Google will only be supporting LLVM's libc++ as the C++ standard library and not supporting other STLs. The Android platform has already been using libc++ since Lollipop and now they are looking to get more application developers using this STL.

  • Google publishes its documentation style guide for developers

    Documentation is often an afterthought — especially for open-source projects. That can make it harder for newcomers to join a project, for example, and sometimes badly written documentation is worse than having no documentation at all. To help developers write better documentation, Google this week opened up its own developer-documentation style guide.

  • Trying Out FreeBSD/TrueOS On The Xeon Scalable + Tyan GT24E-B7106 Platform

    While we have tested a number of Linux distributions on Intel's new Xeon Scalable platform, here are some initial BSD tests using two Xeon Gold 6138 processors with the Tyan GT24E-B7106 1U barebones server.

  • FreeBSD Developers Tackle AMD Zen/Ryzen Temperature Monitoring Before Linux

    While Linux users of AMD's new Zen-based Ryzen/Threadripper/Epyc processors are still waiting for thermal driver support to hit the mainline Linux kernel, FreeBSD developers have already managed to produce the Zen "Family 17h" CPU thermal monitoring support on their own.

    From this FreeBSD bug report, developers have managed to get the AMD CPU temperature monitoring working for Zen processors under Linux with their existing temperature driver.

Programming: Python, DevSecOps Skills Gap, Go Programming, Java EE, GNU Tools Cauldron and GnuCOBOL

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Improving security through data analysis and visualizations

        

    My last tip is that in recent years, there have been a lot of new tools that make designing nice visualizations much easier. In fact, many really prevent you from creating the disasters that you’d find here: https://www.reddit.com/r/dataisugly/. If you are a Python user, you really should take a look at Seaborn, YellowBrick, and Altair as they are all really impressive libraries.

  • The DevSecOps Skills Gap
  •  

  • How I learned Go Programming

    Go is a relatively new programming language, and nothing makes a developer go crazier than a new programming language, haha! As many new tech inventions, Go was created as an experiment. The goal of its creators was to come up with a language that would resolve bad practices of others while keeping the good things. It was first released in March 2012. Since then Go has attracted many developers from all fields and disciplines.

  • Must go faster, must go faster! Oracle lobs Java EE into GitHub, vows rapid Java SE releases

    Oracle plans to accelerate the pace of Java SE releases – and has moved Java EE's code repository to GitHub in keeping with its avowed desire to step back from managing the beast.

    Java SE has been on a two-year release cycle. That's no longer fast enough, according to Mark Reinhold, chief architect of Oracle’s Java platform group.

    Java competes with other platforms that get updated more often, he explained.

  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Kicks Off Tomorrow

    The annual GNU Tools Cauldron conference focused around the GNU compiler toolchain will kickoff tomorrow, 8 September, in Prague.

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 Released To Let COBOL Code Live On As C

    For those of you still maintaining COBOL code-bases, GnuCOBOL 2.2 is now available as what was formerly OpenCOBOL and also the project's first stable release in nearly one decade.

    GnuCOBOL has been living under the GNU/FSF umbrella for a few years while today's GnuCOBOL 2.2 release is the first stable release since OpenCOBOL 1.1 back in 2009. (Since then was the GnuCOBOL 1.1 release, but just for renaming the project.)

  • GnuCOBOL 2.2 released

    Version 2.2 of the GNU COBOL compiler is out. Changes include a relicensing to GPLv3, a set of new intrinsic functions, a direct call interface for C functions, and more.

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 Debuts with EAPoL Support, Linux Kernel 4.12

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gentoo

Tomasz Jokiel from Porteus Solutions announced the release of the Gentoo-based Porteus Kiosk 4.5 operating system designed for web terminals, which brings numerous improvements, updated components, and new functionality.

First and foremost, Porteus Kiosk 4.5.0 bumps the Linux kernel version from the long-term supported Linux 4.9 series, which was used in the previous release, to the Linux 4.12 branch, shipping with Linux kernel 4.12.10 by default, thus adding an extra layer of hardware support to the free and open-source kiosk operating system for public access computers.

Read more

GNOME: GNOME Mutter, GNOME 3.26, and Support more than one Build System (Meson and Autotools)

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Development
GNOME
  • GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 Adds Built-In Screencast / Remote Desktop Capabilities

    GNOME Mutter 3.25.92 has been released and it incorporates some interesting changes for the end of the GNOME 3.26 development cycle.

  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Up to RC State, Launches on September 13

    GNOME Project's Javier Jardón announced a few moments ago that the GNOME 3.25.92 milestone of the forthcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now available for public testing, marking the end of the development cycle.

    GNOME 3.26 has been in development since early April, and it's now up to RC (Release Candidate) state, which means that the development cycle is over and the team will begin preparations for the final release of the highly anticipated desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.

  • Support more than one Build System

    I’ve tried to add Meson build system to MyHTML, but fail. They prefer the one is used today. That’s OK.

    Support two build systems increase burden on project maintenance, this is the main reason to reject my pull request and is OK. As for GXml, we have both Autotools and Meson. I’m trying to keep both in sync, as soon as a new file is added, but you may forget one or the other.

    While I use GXml on my Windows programs, I need to make sure it will work properly out of the box, like Autotools does, before to remove the later.

Games: Citadale: The Legends Trilogy, SEED, Unsung Story and More

Filed under
Gaming

Arch Linux 2017.09.01 Is Available for Download, Powered by Linux Kernel 4.12.8

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A new month, a new ISO snapshot of the popular Arch Linux operating system sees the light of day, offering newcomers or those who want to deploy the OS on new systems an up-to-date installation medium.

Arch Linux 2017.09.01 is the Arch Linux ISO snapshot for September 2017, powered by the Linux 4.12.8 kernel, incorporating all the software updates and security patches, as well as other tweaks that have been released through the official repositories of the GNU/Linux distribution during the entire month of August 2017.

It's the most up-to-date Arch Linux installation medium, and you should download it if you want to deploy the operating system on new hardware or you want to reinstall your broken Arch Linux OS without having to download hundreds of updates from the repositories after the installation.

Read more

Development Tools: Java IDEs, Qt Creator, C++17

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Development
  • What is your favorite open source Java IDE?

    That developers have strong opinions about the tools they use is no secret, and perhaps some of the strongest opinions come out around integrated development environments.

    When we asked our community what their favorite Python IDE is, more than 10,000 of you responded. Now, it's time for Java developers to get their turn.

  • Qt Creator 4.4 Open-Source IDE Released with C++ and CMake Improvements, More

    The Qt Company's Eike Ziller announced the release of the Qt Creator 4.4.0 free and open-source IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

    More than two months in the making, Qt Creator 4.4 introduces new inline annotations in the build-in editor, which could come in handy if you're using Clang code model or bookmarks, along with the ability for the editor to display Clang errors, bookmarks errors, as well as other warnings at the end of the corresponding text line. The feature can be enabled under Options -> Text Editor -> Display.

  • C++17 Formally Approved, Just Waiting On ISO Publication

    C++17 (formerly C++1z) is ready for its debut. C++17 has been formally approved by its committee and is just waiting on ISO publishing.

    Back in March we reported on "C++17 being done" while work on C++20 is already underway. C++17 hasn't changed since while the last major ballot has now passed with 100% approval and they are now ready to officially publish this latest C++ standard. They just need to make a few editorial comments to the standard for spelling/formatting and then send the firmed up document to the ISO for publishing.

CyberArk open-sources Conjur

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • CyberArk open-sources Conjur

    Security vendor CyberArk has released an open-source version of its Conjur secrets management software.

    CyberArk Conjur enables DevOps teams to automatically secure and manage secrets used by machines and users to protect containerised and cloud-native applications across the DevOps pipeline, company officials said.

  • Open-source stewardship key as CyberArk moves to help devs avoid another Heartbleed

    Conjur’s credential-management technology includes specific functionality for securely managing ‘secrets’ – access keys, privileged account credentials, API keys, and other sensitive information – and Lawler expects that the release of CyberArk Conjur Community Edition to the open-source community will drive a flurry of innovation that will further raise the level of open-source security overall.

Wine Staging 2.16

Filed under
Software

Free Software and Open Access

Filed under
OSS
  • Coinbase’s GDAX announces open source library of cryptocurrency trading tools

    San Francisco-based Coinbase has announced that its professional based exchange Global Digital Asset Exchange (GDAX) has introduced the ‘GDAX Trading Toolkit (GTT)’ an open source library for trading digital currency across a variety of exchanges.

    The GTT provides a suite of tools for traders to design, create, and operate trading features such as automated trading bots and personal portfolio trackers.

  • The Washington Post starts using Talk, an open-source tool for improving online comments

    An open-source tool called Talk is being rolled out on The Washington Post website starting today (6 September), to help reimagine the online commenting experience for both the newsroom and readers.

    The tool is developed by The Coral Project, a joint initiative from Mozilla, Washington Post and The New York Times, initially supported by the Knight Foundation and funded by the Democracy Fund, the Rita Allen Foundation, and Mozilla.

    Talk is currently live on three sections on washingtonpost.com – business, politics and The Switch blog. Over the coming weeks, it will become more widely available on The Washington Post, and other organisations such as Fairfax Media titles in Australia will start using it.

    The tool, which launched in beta in March and is currently on its third version, can be installed by any newsroom using the available documentation, and more features are being added regularly.

  • European Libraries’ Five Principles For Open Access Negotiations With Publishers

    European research libraries have issued five principles for libraries to use when holding open access negotiations with publishers, seeking to prevent over-charging and promote transparency and sustainable access.

  • Open educational resources can offer relief from high textbook prices

    Timbo X. Spartan is your typical MSU student. He goes to Economics 201 and Spanish 202 on Monday and Wednesday, and ISS 215 and Accounting 201 on Tuesday and Thursday.

    According to the Student Book Store's current listings, the required texts for these courses would have our friend Timbo spending $100 on economics, $88 on Spanish, $160 on the ISS course and $187 on accounting. This adds up to $535 in materials for one semester.

    Of course, this is all hypothetical, but not unrealistic. Chemical engineering sophomore Megan Richardson has spent more than $400 on materials for classes this semester and isn't finished shopping yet.

    "Last year I spent close to $300 on one chemistry textbook," Richardson said. "This is on the higher end of what I've spent so far, but yeah. It's kind of ridiculous."

Security: NSA Data Dumps Again

Filed under
Security

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

AMD Secure Processor Support and Sound in Linux 4.14

Filed under
Linux
  • AMD Secure Processor Support In Linux 4.14

    The crypto subsystem updates have been pulled in for the Linux 4.14 kernel and it includes more complete AMD Secure Processor support, among other changes.

  • Sound Updates Ready To Be Heard On Linux 4.14

    Takashi Iwai of SUSE has mailed in his sound driver updates for the Linux 4.14 kernel. This time around there isn't too many speaker-shattering changes, but a wide range of fixes and a few notable changes.

Ditching Apple and Microsoft for GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac
  • Switching to xmonad + Gnome – and ditching a Mac

    I have been using XFCE with xmonad for years now. I’m not sure exactly how many, but at least 6 years, if not closer to 10. Today I threw in the towel and switched to Gnome.

    More recently, at a new job, I was given a Macbook Pro. I wasn’t entirely sure what to think of this, but I thought I’d give it a try. I found MacOS to be extremely frustrating and confining. It had no real support for a tiling window manager, and although projects like amethyst tried to approximate what xmonad can do on Linux, they were just too limited by the platform and were clunky. Moreover, the entire UI was surprisingly sluggish; maybe that was an induced effect from animations, but I don’t think that explains it. A Debisn stretch install, even on inferior hardware, was snappy in a way that MacOS never was. So I have requested to swap for a laptop that will run Debian. The strange use of Command instead of Control for things, combined with the overall lack of configurability of keybindings, meant that I was going to always be fighting muscle memory moving from one platform to another. Not only that, but being back in the world of a Free Software OS means a lot.

  • Google is trying to poach Microsoft Azure partners by sending them free Chromebooks
  • Google’s Cloud Team Is Sending Chromebooks To Microsoft Partners

     

    Microsoft has its Azure platform, Amazon has AWS, Google is entering the arena with Google Cloud and each company is throwing serious money to grab a slice of this market as it continues to expand.

  • Windows loses the market share growth battle against Linux [Ed: Almost no site (that I've stumbled upon) mentions that the firm behind these numbers is Microsoft-connected. Microsoft sites like this one say Windows "market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%." But no, it's more like 50%. ChromeOS, Android etc. are conveniently unaccounted for.]

    In August, Windows dropped to a 90.70% market share from 91.45% from July, despite Microsoft’s effort. This drop of 0.75% is the biggest one that the operating system had recorded since April 2016. Back then, the OS’s market share collapsed from 90.45% to 88.77%.

3 Cool Linux Service Monitors

Filed under
Linux

The Linux world abounds in monitoring apps of all kinds. We're going to look at my three favorite service monitors: Apachetop, Monit, and Supervisor. They're all small and fairly simple to use. apachetop is a simple real-time Apache monitor. Monit monitors and manages any service, and Supervisor is a nice tool for managing persistent scripts and commands without having to write init scripts for them.

Read more

Android Oreo Adds Linux Kernel Requirements and New Hardening Features

Filed under
Android
Linux

The Linux kernel continues to add security protections so developers don’t have to build them on their own. As a result, one of the first steps security experts recommend for protecting against embedded Linux malware threats is to work with the latest possible kernel release and then regularly update field devices. Now that Android is getting long in the tooth -- it was nine years ago this month that Sergey Brin and Larry Page rollerbladed onto the stage to announce the debut of the flagship HTC G1 phone -- more and more Android devices are being attacked due to out-of-date Linux kernels. To address the problem before it adds to Android’s substantial challenge with malware generated from rogue or unprotected apps, Google has announced new requirements in Android 8.0 (“Oreo”) to build on Linux kernels no older than kernel 4.4.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%