Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 02 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ALT Linux 8.1 Workstation Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.34, MATE & KDE Desktops Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2016 - 8:37am
Story antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux OS Is Just Around the Corner, RC1 Out Now Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2016 - 8:36am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 10:05pm
Story SitePoint on FOSS Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 10:01pm
Story Pinebook is a Linux laptop with an ARM CPU for $89 and up Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 9:33pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 9:13pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 9:06pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 8:46pm
Story Solus Users Receive Linux Kernel 4.8.10 and Vivaldi 1.5, QOwnNotes Lands as Well Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 8:44pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2016 - 4:11pm

Linux Kernel and Graphics News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Kernel 4.9 Lands in Ubuntu 17.04's Proposed Repositories, Based on RC5

Filed under
Linux

Last month, we discussed here the fact that we'll be covering the entire development cycle of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system, which is expected to launch sometime in April 2017.

Read more

The Linux Foundation Issues Free E-Book on Open Source License Compliance Best Practices

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation today released a free e-book, Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise, that serves as a practical guide for organizations on how best to use open source code and participate in open source communities while complying with the spirit and the letter of open source licensing.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.04 to Offer an Evolved Unity 8 Session as More Apps Will Run as Snaps

Filed under
Ubuntu

As reported earlier in the week, Canonical held its Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) event between November 15 and November 16, 2016, during which members of the Ubuntu community were able to learn more about what's coming to the Ubuntu 17.04 Linux.

Read more

Also: Canonical Announces the Public Preview of Microsoft SQL Server on Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Promises WebGL 2 Support, Less CPU Usage, and FLAC Playback

Filed under
Moz/FF

While Firefox's 50 milestone failed to introduce any major features to the open-source, free and cross-platform web browser used by millions of people worldwide, it looks like Mozilla has some big plans for the next major release.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF

ReactOS 0.4.3 Release

Filed under
OS
  • ReactOS 0.4.3 Released

    The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of another incremental update, version 0.4.3. This would be fourth such release the project has made this year, an indication we hope of the steady progress that we have made. Approximately 342 issues were resolved since the release of 0.4.2, with the oldest dating all the way back to 2006 involving text alignment.

  • ReactOS 0.4.3 Released, Fixes Over 300 Issues

    ReactOS 0.4.3 is now available as the newest version of this open-source OS that seeks to re-implement the interfaces of Windows.

    As described earlier, ReactOS 0.4.3 has a ton of changes. ReactOS 0.4.3 has many fixes/improvements to its kernel, less crashes in the Win32 subsystem, file-system fixes, a USB audio driver has been started, a basic filter driver added, TCP/IP fixes, improvements to kernel-mode DLLs, a rewritten WinSock 2 DLL, and much more.

  • ReactOS 0.4.3 Officially Released with New Winsock Library, over 340 Bug Fixes

    Today, November 16, 2016, the development team behind the ReactOS free and open-source computer operating system designed to be compatible with Windows applications and drivers, announced the release of ReactOS 0.4.3.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

New Wine Staging

Filed under
Software

Debian and Ubuntu News

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Contributors Survey 2016

    In order to better understand and document who contributes to Debian, we (Mathieu ONeil, Molly de Blanc, and Stefano Zacchiroli) have created this survey to capture the current state of participation in the Debian Project through the lense of common demographics. We hope a general survey will become an annual effort, and that each year there will also be a focus on a specific aspect of the project or community. The 2016 edition contains sections concerning work, employment, and labour issues in order to learn about who is getting paid to work on and with Debian, and how those relationships affect contributions.

    We want to hear from as many Debian contributors as possible—whether you've submitted a bug report, attended a DebConf, reviewed translations, maintain packages, participated in Debian teams, or are a Debian Developer. Completing the survey should take 10-30 minutes, depending on your current involvement with the project and employment status.

    In an effort to reflect our own ideals as well as those of the Debian project, we are using LimeSurvey, an entirely free software survey tool, in an instance of it hosted by the LimeSurvey developers

  • The long tail in a common’s man journey to debconf16 – 2

    This is an extension of part 1 which I shared few days ago. This would be a longish one so please bear.

    First of all somebody emailed me this link so in the future a layover at Doha Airport will be a bit expensive from before, approx INR 700/- added to the ticket costs...

  • Ubuntu Continues Working On Netplan For Network Configuration

    Earlier this year Ubuntu developers announced Netplan as a new, consolidated network configuration tool. Netplan was added to Ubuntu 16.10 and more improvements are on the way for Ubuntu 17.04.

  • Ubuntu Developers Continue Talks To Discontinue i386 & PowerPC Images

    Discussed today during the Ubuntu 17.04 Online Summit was the dwindling state of PowerPC (32-bit PPC) and i386 (x86 32-bit) support for Ubuntu and overall Linux for that matter. Images are still being produced but likely for not much longer although the package archives are anticipated to remain.

    Routinely the past few years there have been discussions over discontinuing Ubuntu i386. No announcements were made today but from the sounds of it, the official images might not be produced much longer while other Ubuntu spins may still produce them. The Ubuntu i386 archives also aren't endangered of disappearing anytime soon as they are still needed for 32-bit software compatibility, etc.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How to Avoid Burnout Managing an Open Source Project

    Regardless of where you work in the stack, if you work with open source software, there’s likely been a time when you faced burnout and other unhealthy side effects related to your work on open source projects. A few of the talks at OSCON Europe addressed this darker side of working in open source head-on.

  • Netflix's Chaos Monkey Open Cloud Utility is Worth A Look

    Not many organizations have the cloud expertise that Netflix has, and it may come as a surprise to some people to learn that Netflix regularly open sources key, tested and hardened cloud tools that it has used for years. We've reported on Netflix open sourcing a series of interesting "Monkey" cloud tools as part of its "simian army," which it has deployed as a series satellite utilities orbiting its central cloud platform.

    Netflix previously released Chaos Monkey, a utility that improves the resiliency of Software as a Service by randomly choosing to turn off servers and containers at optimized times. Then, Netflix announced the upgrade of Chaos Monkey, and Chaos Monkey 2.0 is now on github. Now, in an interview with infoQ, Netflix Engineer Lorin Hochstein weighs in on what you can get out of this tool.

  • Google Collects Open Artificial Intelligence Demos, Invites You to Contribute
  • Why design and marketing matter and what to do about it

    Rachel Nabors started off the second morning of All Things Open with a great talk about the need for designers in open source.

  • How to make your own 'unexpected' number generator

    I don't generally use word processors or WYSIWYG applications, because they all tend to assume that you're designing for a single output. However, for this project I was designing for a specific output; I wanted to produce a file that would be printable on a single US Letter and A4 sheet of paper, which would then be folded into a PocketMod, and carried in one's wallet, or used as a bookmark in a gaming book. Having used it for professional print work at a former job and for some community conferences, I knew that Scribus was the tool for the job.

  • ARK Announces Official Open Source Release of ARK Blockchain Code on GitHub

    This is a paid press relase. CoinTelegraph does not endorse and is not responsible for or liable for any content, accuracy, quality, advertising, products or other materials on this page. Readers should do their own research before taking any actions related to the company. CoinTelegraph is not responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in the press release.

  • An introduction to open source GIS – Part I

    Geospatial information system (GIS) solutions make sense of location-aware data, turning it into usable insights in industries as diverse as energy, agriculture, transportation, manufacturing, finance, and all levels of government

  • Moodle: An Open Source Community To Protect, Improve And Sustainably Benefit From

    Open Source communities are as vibrant as the participants within them – as with any community, your return is proportional to your investment. An example of someone who is intuitively aware of this is Bas Brands. In an interview for Moodlerooms’ E-Learn Magazine, he tells his experience of sustaining a lifelong relationship with Moodle’s Open Source community, while makes a name for himself and a learning company with alluring prospects.

  • Sauce Labs Raises $70M for Application Testing

    Open-source based testing vendor looks to accelerate its business with new funding.

    Before any company deploys any web or mobile app, it needs to test, and that's where Sauce Labs fits in. Sauce Labs announced on November 15 that it has raised a $70 million series E round of funding. The new capital will be used to help Sauce Labs expands its go-to-market and engineering efforts.

    The new round of funding was led by Centerview Capital Technology, IVP and Adams Street Partners. Total funding to date for Sauce Labs now stands at $101 million.

  • LLVM Now Supports Qualcomm's New Falkor CPU

    A few days back I wrote about Qualcomm Falkor support coming to GCC while now the LLVM compiler stack has received the similar treatment.

  • Editorial: Groups make Strides with open source textbooks

    With college being as expensive as it is, the high price of textbooks has always been a problem for students. Books can increase the cost of college by thousands of dollars, which can be troublesome for those already struggling to make ends meet. However, groups on campus are making efforts to alleviate this problem and make affordable textbooks a reality. The UConn bookstore recently donated $30,000 towards addressing this concern. In addition, the Undergraduate Student Government has been working along with UConnPIRG to provide open source textbooks for the student body.

    The first major initiative was undertaken with chemistry professor Dr. Edward Neth, who teaches CHEM 1124, 1125 and 1126. Working with a $20,000 donation from the student government, Neth edited an existing open access textbook and adapted it for his classes. Other chemistry professors have begun using open source textbooks as well, and this has already saved students thousands of dollars.

  • Examining ValueObjects

    When programming, I often find it's useful to represent things as a compound. A 2D coordinate consists of an x value and y value. An amount of money consists of a number and a currency. A date range consists of start and end dates, which themselves can be compounds of year, month, and day.

    As I do this, I run into the question of whether two compound objects are the same. If I have two point objects that both represent the Cartesian coordinates of (2,3), it makes sense to treat them as equal. Objects that are equal due to the value of their properties, in this case their x and y coordinates, are called value objects.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • How to fix the Cryptsetup vulnerability in Linux

    Linux enjoys a level of security that most platforms cannot touch. That does not, in any way, mean it is perfect. In fact, over the last couple of years a number of really ugly vulnerabilities have been found — and very quickly patched. Enough time has passed since Heartbleed for those that do to find yet another security issue.

  • Get root on Linux: learn the secret password
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • The Web-Shaking Mirai Botnet Is Splintering—But Also Evolving

    Over the last few weeks, a series of powerful hacker attacks powered by the malware known as Mirai have used botnets created of internet-connected devices to clobber targets ranging from the internet backbone company Dyn to the French internet service provider OVH. And just when it seemed that Mirai might be losing steam, new evidence shows that it’s still dangerous—and even evolving.

    Researchers following Mirai say that while the number of daily assaults dipped briefly, they’re now observing development in the Mirai malware itself that seems designed to allow it to infect more of the vulnerable routers, DVRs and other internet-of-things (IoT) gadgets it’s hijacked to power its streams of malicious traffic. That progression could actually increase the total population available to the botnet, they warn, potentially giving it more total compute power to draw on.

    “There was an idea that maybe the bots would die off or darken over time, but I think what we are seeing is Mirai evolve,” says John Costello, a senior analyst at the security intelligence firm Flashpoint. “People are really being creative and finding new ways to infect devices that weren’t susceptible previously. Mirai is not going away.”

  • This $5 Device Can Hack Your Locked Computer In One Minute

    Next time you go out for lunch and leave your computer unattended at the office, be careful. A new tool makes it almost trivial for criminals to log onto websites as if they were you, and get access to your network router, allowing them to launch other types of attacks.

    Hackers and security researchers have long found ways to hack into computers left alone. But the new $5 tool called PoisonTap, created by the well-known hacker and developer Samy Kamkar, can even break into password-protected computers, as long as there’s a browser open in the background.Kamkar explained how it works in a blog post published on Wednesday.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Linux Foundation Commits Suicide as Microsoft E.E.E. Takes a Leap Forward

Filed under
Linux

I have covered Microsoft's interference with FOSS for over a decade and carefully studied even pertinent antitrust documents. I know the company's way of thinking when it comes to undermining their competition, based on internal communications and strategy papers. Even days ago we got this in the news.

The pattern of embrace and extend (to extinguish) -- all this while leveraging software patents to make Linux a Microsoft cash cow or compel OEMs to preinstall privacy-hostile Microsoft software/apps with proprietary formats (lockin) -- never ended. What I see in the Linux Foundation right now is what I saw in Nokia 5 years ago and in Novell 10 years ago -- the very thing that motivated me to start Boycott Novell, a site that has just turned 10 with nearly 22,000 blog posts.

It is a saddening day because it's a culmination, after years of Microsoft 'micro' payments to the Linux Foundation (e.g. event sponsorship in exchange for keynote positions), which will have Microsoft shoved down the throats of GNU/Linux proponents and give an illusion of peace when there is none, not just on the patent front but also other fronts (see what Microsoft's partner Accenture is doing in Munich right now). The links below are a complete list of the bad (in my view very bad) news.

"We need to slaughter Novell before they get stronger….If you’re going to kill someone, there isn’t much reason to get all worked up about it and angry. You just pull the trigger. Any discussions beforehand are a waste of time. We need to smile at Novell while we pull the trigger."

--Jim Allchin, Microsoft's Platform Group Vice President

In the news today:

What's important in open source today

Filed under
OSS

Jono mentioned that it's his goal in life to "understand every nuance of how we build predicable, productive, and accessible communities." He says we are surrounded by communities. We have Wikipedia, the maker movement, and the public becoming the VC for crowdfunding. The data backs up this trend. Community growth participation is growing across industries. Using a commercial software methodology, it would cost over $10 billion to build Wikipedia and/or Fedora. Open source is not just a passing phase.

Read more

Farewell to Rob Collins

Filed under
Obits

We would like to share with you the sad news, that Rob Collins has passed away earlier this month, on November 2nd, after a short but intense illness.

Many of you may know Rob from the sponsored massage sessions he regularly ran at EuroPython in recent years and which he continued to develop, taking them from a single man setup (single threaded process) to a group of people setup by giving workshops (multiprocessing) and later on by passing on his skills to more leaders (removing the GIL) to spread wellness and kindness throughout our conference series.

Read more

Linux Dominates November TOP500 Supercomputer List

Filed under
Linux

The latest semi-annual list of the world's top 500 supercomputers was released on November 14, showing little change at the top of the list. The China-based Sunway TaihuLight supercomputer, which first claimed the title of the world's fastest system in June 2016, still reigns supreme.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Development News

  • KDevelop 5.0.3 Open-Source IDE Improves GitHub Handling Authentication, More
    The development behind the open-source and cross-platform KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) was proud to announce on the first day of December the availability of the third point release for KDevelop 5.0 stable series. KDevelop 5.0.3 arrives one and a half months after the second maintenance update, but it's a small bugfix release that attempts to patch a total of nine issues reported by users since then. However, it's a recommended update for all users. "We are happy to announce the release of KDevelop 5.0.3, the third bugfix and stabilization release for KDevelop 5.0. An upgrade to 5.0.3 is strongly recommended to all users of 5.0.0, 5.0.1 or 5.0.2," reads the release announcement.
  • PHP 7.1.0
    The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.1.0.
  • PHP 7.1 Makes Its Debut
    This first major update to last year's huge PHP 7.0 release builds several new features on top. Introduced by PHP 7.1 is nullable types, a void return type, a iterable pseudo-type, class constant visibility modifiers, support for catching multiple exception types, and many other language enhancements plus more performance optimizations and other work.

Games for GNU/Linux

OSS Leftovers

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/48
    After releasing daily snapshots without interruption for 17 days, Tumbleweed did slow down a bit during the last week. As already mentioned in my last review, 1124 had been canceled due to an issue with sddm installing strange branding configurations. And later on, we ‘broke’ our own staging setup and needed to bootstrap a few of them, making the throughput much lower than you were used to. So, we ended up with 3 snapshots since my last review: 1125, 1128 and 1129.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 28
    November is over, Santa Claus elves start to stress and the YaST team brings you one of the last reports of 2016. Let’s see what’s new in YaSTland.