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Friday, 28 Nov 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Kylin 14.10 Utopic Unicorn : Adds New Features and Improve the System Stability

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Kylin 14.10 Utopic Unicorn is the latest version of Ubuntu Kylin based on Ubuntu 14.10 featuring with Unity desktop environment. Released and announced by Ubuntu Kylin team brings with improved stability along with newly added features which provides better user experience.

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Celebrating Choice, Control and Independence On the Web

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

Birthdays are a time to reflect on past accomplishments. And ours – yours – was huge: we helped save the Internet. We saved the Internet by not accepting the status quo, by not allowing corporate interests to acquire a stranglehold on our online lives. At the time, Microsoft dominated the Web. It was becoming stagnant, locked down and shaped by the vision of one company rather than the creativity of all. Firefox changed that.

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Also: Happy 10th Birthday Firefox!

Celebrating 10 Years of Firefox

Gluster Lead Speaks on Open Source Scale-Out Storage and OpenStack

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

GlusterFS, the open source scale-out storage system Red Hat acquired in August 2012, is poised to play a key role in OpenStack and cloud computing, according to Gluster lead Dave Mcallister.

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diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development

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Development
Linux

Hardware errors are tough to code for. In some cases, they're impossible to code for. A particular brand of hardware error is the Machine-Check Exception (MCE), which means a CPU has a problem. On Windows systems, it's one of the causes of the Blue Screen of Death.

Everyone wants to handle hardware errors well, because it can mean the difference between getting a little indication of what actually went wrong and getting no information at all.

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Debian Project Announces the Code Names for Debian 9 and Debian 10

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Debian

The Debian project has chosen the names of the next two versions of the operating system that are scheduled to be released in the coming years. They don't have any glamour, but they will be easily remembered.

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Linux 3.18-rc4

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Linux

Hey, things are finally calming down. In fact, it looked *really* calm
until yesterday, at which point some people clearly realized "hey, I
should push my stuff to Linus so that it makes it into -rc4", and then
a third of all changes came in the last day, but despite that, rc4
finally looks like things are falling into place, and we'll get to
stabilize this release after all.

Here's to hoping the trend holds...

Things look fairly normal. A bit over half is drivers, and almost a
third is architecture patches (arm, powerpc, mips and s390). The rest
is a few filesystem updates (mainly XFS) and misc random stuff.

The shortlog gives a feel for the details, and nothing looks
particularly scary or odd.

Linus

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Ubuntu 14.10

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 14.10 is another nice little step forward for Ubuntu without being spectacular.

Linux has faced many hurdles over the years such as lack of MP3 support, Flash support, hardware support, gaming, decent software, running Windows applications and recently Netflix. All of these issues can now be filed away as "used to be an issue".

Ubuntu is one of the more popular distributions for a reason. As Windows users love to say "It just works" and for it just does.

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Firefox @10: How Mozilla Succeeded and Why it has now Failed

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Moz/FF

I remember that day well and was among the many that wrote about the Firefox 1.0. The promise of Firefox 1.0 was to disrupt the browser status quo and to erode the hegemony of Microsoft's Internet Explorer Empire.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Red Hat confuses Linux users with latest Fedora moves

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Red Hat

Since 2013, we’ve seen Red Hat embrace CentOS, the previously community-supported, open source equivalent of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and we’ve seen the release of RHEL 7 and its hard push to systemd exclusivity. Now we’re seeing the new road map for Fedora, which will come in three different flavors with Fedora 21. These are all major steps in a very short time period, and frankly, some of these moves seem awkward at best.

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Mozilla Delivers Firefox Developer Edition

Filed under
Development
Moz/FF
Web

Mozilla has officially launched Firefox Developer Edition, billing it as “the first browser created specifically for developers.” If developers sound like a very narrowcasted audience to aim a browser at, remember that many of them complain about having to work across numerous platforms and environments and aim for disparate app stores. There are also a lot of them who work in Firefox via tools such as Firebug.

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Franklin Weng: The strength behind open source is the strength of contributing

Filed under
KDE
Interviews
OSS

Franklin is a 39 year old FOSS activist based in Taipei. He has coordinated KDE's zh_TW translation team since 2006, and is the core developer of ezgo (Chinese), a compilation of educational software used by schools all over Taiwan. ezgo, which in its Linux installation uses KDE by default, blends more than 100 free software applications into one localized, easy to use package.

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Tiny Raspberry Pi A+ SBC goes for $20

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Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation launched a Model A+ with a $20 price, and a tiny 65 x 56mm footprint, 23g weight, and compact 40-pin expansion header.

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Also: Raspberry Pi supercapacitor micro-UPS seeks funding

A 'proprietary' Linux would have cost $1 trillion & 8,000 person-years

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Linux

As CTO at open source Business Intelligence (BI) products company Pentaho, James Dixon is responsible for the firm's architecture and technology roadmap.

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Why all software needs a license

Filed under
OSS
Legal

All software developers should add a copyright license. Why? Because open source licensing is all about granting permission in advance

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You Can't Trust Closed-Source Code - Germany Agrees

Filed under
OSS
Security

Similarly, moves by both Microsoft and Amazon, among others, to set up local data centres in the EU will not on their own protect European data unless that is encrypted by the companies themselves, and the cloud computing providers do *not* have access to the keys. Indeed, if the data is encrypted in this way, local storage is not so important, since the NSA will have an equally hard time decrypting it wherever it is held - as far as we know, that is.

Because of that recent US court judgment ordering Microsoft to hand over emails held in Ireland, many people are now aware of the dangers of cloud computing in the absence of encryption under the control of the customer. But very few seem to have woken up to the problems of backdoors in proprietary software that I mentioned at the start of this post. One important exception is the German government, which according to Sky News is working on an extremely significant law in this area

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OpenSSL, Bash bugs show why firms should back FOSS projects

Filed under
OSS
Security

This year has been an unusual one for free software in that two popular projects have been hit by vulnerabilities that have had wide ramifications for all classes of software. And that is one good reason why the big proprietary software firms should look to support such projects financially.

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