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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 12:34pm
Story A Privacy & Security Concern Regarding GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 11:43am
Story Qt for Python Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 10:54am
Story Events: Digital Born Media Carnival, SCaLE16x, NZ Open Source Awards and More Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 10:41am
Story GNOME Desktop/GTK: Google Maps, GTK3 and Compilers Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 10:30am
Story OpenAFS 1.8 Released, Drops Pre-2.6 Linux Support Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 10:25am
Story Wine 3.6 Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 10:08am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 7:44am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 12:29am
Story GNOME 3.28 Desktop Gets First Point Release, It's Ready for Mass Deployment Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2018 - 12:23am

Mainstream academia embraces open source hardware

Filed under
OSS

Twenty years ago, even staunch proponents of free and open source software like Richard Stallman questioned the social imperative for free hardware designs. Academics had barely started to consider the concept; the number of papers coming out annually on the topic were less than could be counted on someone's fingers.

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Submitting my first patch to the Linux kernel

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Linux

I started using Linux three years ago while attending university, and I was fascinated to discover a different desktop environment. My professor introduced me to the Ubuntu operating system, and I decided to dual-boot it along with Windows on my laptop the same day.

Within three months, I had completely abandoned Windows and shifted to Fedora after hearing about the RPM Package Manager. I also tried running Debian for stability, but in early 2017 I realized Arch Linux suits all my needs for cutting-edge packages. Now I use it along with the KDE desktop and can customize it according to my needs.

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Ubuntu, Lubuntu and Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) Final Beta Released, Available for Download Now

    Canonical released today the beta development version (a.k.a. Final Beta) of its upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, along with the second beta for opt-in flavors.

    While many of the opt-in Ubuntu flavors participated in last month's beta release, this is the first time Ubuntu 18.04 LTS gets a public beta build that users can actually download and install on their personal computers if they plan on becoming early adopters ahead of the official release later this month.

  • Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta has been released!

    Lubuntu Bionic Beaver Final Beta (soon to be 18.04) has been released!

    Thanks to the hard work of the Lubuntu team, we are pleased to announce the final beta!

  • Xubuntu 18.04 Community Wallpaper Contest Winners!

    The Xubuntu team are happy to announce the results of the 18.04 community wallpaper contest!

    We want to send out a huge thanks to every contestant; last time we had 92 submissions but now you all made us work much harder in picking the best ones out with a total of 162 submissions!

Software: Flowblade, Linux Package Managers, and Programmers' Tools

Filed under
Software
  • A look at GNU/Linux exclusive Flowblade video editor

    As a journalism student, I deal with both print but also multimedia forms of journalism, on a daily basis.

    Generally speaking, I have always used various Adobe software for my needs, such as Audition for my audio, and Premiere for my video while in school, but I know that there is plenty of awesome and free (albeit I will concede, rarely as fully-featured) software out there that could be used to substitute. One example, is Flowblade.

    Flowblade is a GNU/Linux exclusive, which is pretty cool really, given that nowadays many of the tools and applications people use on GNU/Linux are available for other systems as well. Thankfully, Flowblade is pretty sophisticated, so many may find it to be more of a suitable replacement for other software, than expected from an exclusive.

    Not to be dismissive and say that all GNU/Linux exclusive software is terrible or anything, but its a fairly common opinion of less than stellar software attempting to emulate its Windows counterpart.

  • Linux Package Managers

    We’ll compare different Linux Package Managers. Between all Linux distributions, one of the things they share is the need to be able to install new software packages onto the system. Depending on the distribution, various package managers are available, allowing the user to install, manage, and remove packages easily and quickly. Package managers are very good at streamlining installs, with common installation locations and configurations. In this article, we will discuss the different available package managers, what distributions they can be used on, and what makes each unique. We will cover Debian-Based Package Managers, RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)-Based Package Managers, and other custom designed package managers.

  • 10 Reasons why Linux is better for programmers and developers

    Linux based operating systems are very popular among programmers, developers and server administrators. But still, there are many new programmers unaware of the power of Linux and it’s flexibility. I’m talking about those programmers who’ve just started the career and been a Windows user for a long time.

  • Top 5 Popular Free Source Code Editors for Programmers

    A source code editor is a program specifically designed for editing source code of computer programs. It can be a stand-alone application or part of any IDE or web browser. It is the most important tool for programmers because editing a source code is the main job for a programmer.

​Symantec may violate Linux GPL in Norton Core Router

Filed under
GNU
Legal

For years, embedded device manufacturers have been illegally using Linux. Typically, they use Linux without publishing their device's source code, which Linux's GNU General Public License version 2 (GPLv2) requires them to do. Well, guess what? Another vendor, this time Symantec, appears to be the guilty party.

This was revealed when Google engineer and Linux security expert Matthew Garrett was diving into his new Norton Core Router. This is a high-end Wi-Fi router. Symantec claims it's regularly updated with the latest security mechanisms. Garrett popped his box open to take a deeper look into Symantec's magic security sauce.

What he found appears to be a Linux distribution based on the QCA Software Development Kit (QSDK) project. This is a GPLv2-licensed, open-source platform built around the Linux-based OpenWrt Wi-Fi router operating system.

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Fedora To Decide What To Do About GNOME 3.28's Auto-Suspend Default

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Red Hat

While Ubuntu developers have decided to no longer enable auto-suspend by default as set with the new GNOME 3.28 desktop when running on AC power, Fedora developers are still debating the issue.

While there is certainly overlap between Fedora/RedHat developers and those working on GNOME, including those that sanctioned this upstream change during the GNOME 3.28 cycle, the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has now been summoned to voice their opinion on the matter as well as the Fedora Workstation special interest group.

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Games: Phoenix RC, Undead Horde, Crusader Kings II

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux 4.17 Gets PhoenixRC Flight Controller Support & PS/2 Mouse Improvements

    From several of the pull requests covered on Phoronix this week for the in-progress Linux 4.17 kernel, there are many areas seeing improved hardware/device support with this next kernel upgrade, including the input drivers.

    Last month I wrote about Phoenix RC Flight Controller support coming to Linux. That flight controller is modelled after radio controllers for model airplanes/helicopters/drones and designed for the Phoenix RC model aircraft/drone simulator on Windows, but thanks to a passionate independent developer, is now being supported on Linux. I was surprised by the interest indeed in this driver/controller support.

  • The latest teaser for the action adventure 'Undead Horde' from 10tons is out

    Ready to become a Necromancer? Undead Horde [Official Site] from 10tons is starting to look really damn good and it's coming to Linux.

  • Crusader Kings II is free to keep if you grab in the next two days

    The medieval grand strategy title/kinslaying-simulator has been made free to get for a limited time. There’s also a general sale of all of its DLC.

Graphics: DXVK. NVIDIA and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • DXVK 0.41 Released, Slightly More CPU Efficient & Offers A Heads-Up Display

    DXVK 0.41 is now available as the library for Wine users to have Direct3D 11 implemented over Vulkan for generally allowing higher performance than Wine's own D3D11-over-OpenGL layer.

    DXVK continues making great progress for getting D3D11 over Vulkan. DXVK 0.41 improvements include a slight reduction to the overall CPU overhead, better GPU saturation for deferred contexts, and a configurable HUD. There are also bug fixes to get better in spec with SPIR-V and fixes for the games World of Warships and Nier: Automata, among other fixes.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 8.1 Released, Now Supports Real-Time HEVC 4K @ 60 FPS

    NVIDIA has released a new version of their Video Codec SDK that serves as CUDA-based, cross-platform video encode and decode functionality that ultimately succeeds their VDPAU Linux video decode stack for GPU video coding needs.

  • Panfrost Project Getting "Half-Way Driver" To Gallium3D

    Alyssa Rosenzweig who has been leading the charge recently on the open-source Mali T700 GPU driver that was called "Chai" but has been renamed to "Panfrost" is now pursuing a "half-way driver" approach to testing their knowledge of the hardware's command stream.

Security: Linux Foundation's 'Product Placement' for Nitrokey and New FUD

Filed under
Security

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Podcast. Dustin Kirkland Leaving, Nextcloud Box

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E05 – High Five - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Google Cloud Poaches Ubuntu's VP of Product

    After being at Canonical for a decade (aside from a brief stint at Gazzang), Dustin Kirkland who most recently served as the company's VP of Product, is joining Google.

    Dustin Kirkland managed the product teams for Ubuntu server, cloud, desktop and IoT the past five years while he's been an open-source developer since the late 90's and continues to maintain many Ubuntu packages himself. Dustin is a highly-skilled developer and manager while now he will be focusing his efforts on the Google Cloud.

  • The Nextcloud Box: a review of building an IoT device with snaps

    In 2016, Canonical, Nextcloud and WDLabs introduced the Nextcloud Box, the first IoT style device running with snaps out of the box. Besides sales of nearly 2K boxes before Western Digital shut down their research division WDLabs late last year, the snap been extremely popular with some days hitting over 10,000 downloads. Its installed base is estimated to be over 8000, making it a popular way to run a private cloud. Read our guest blog by Nextcloud’s Jos Poortvliet on to learn more about Nextcloud, the Box and how snaps help thousands of Nextcloud users keep their data under their control.

Servers: Akash, Containers and More

Filed under
Server
  • ​Want to profit from your underused servers? Overclock has an idea

    Akash is a blockchain-powered, open, and decentralized compute marketplace, which enables you to monetize your business's underused server capacity. With up to 85 percent of the world's compute capacity sitting unused in data centers, there's a lot of compute out there.

  • 5 Things to Know Before Adopting Microservice and Container Architectures

    We definitely consider ourselves early adopters of containers, and we started packaging services in them almost as soon as Docker released its first production-ready version in the summer of 2014. Many of the customers I talk with are just now beginning — or thinking about beginning — such journeys, and they want to know everything we know. They want to know how we make it work, and how we architected it. But part of the process, I like to stress, is that they need to know what we learned from where we struggled along the way.

  • Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry: Better Together

    Industry veterans have cast predictions far and wide on what to expect in 2018. And while we can’t ensure every prediction will come true, many would agree that the container industry will continue to grow as it maintains support for businesses looking to leverage new technologies and platforms. In fact, the application container market is projected to grow from $762 million in 2016 to $2.7 billion by 2020 according to 451 Research.

    With this explosive growth, it’s easy to understand why some individuals are seeing Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry as competitive projects. The reality? While there is some functional overlap between the two, they ultimately serve complementary purposes that work toward the same goal. By taking approaches that leverage both projects, organizations are actually making it easier to manage their entire cloud environment.

Google Pixel 3 References Spotted In Android Open Source Project (AOSP)

Filed under
Android
OSS
  • Cheaper Google Pixel 3 Is Codenamed Desire; To Be Powered By Android Go: Report

    A few days back we reported that Google is planning to release mid-range Pixel smartphones for price-sensitive markets like India.

    Now, the latest rumor from China hints towards the launch of a lower-end Pixel 3 phone. This handset is most likely to be powered by Android Go, which is basically a stripped down version of Android, customized to run on low-spec hardware.

  • Pixel 3 makes its debut on Google’s Android project site

    Google’s Pixel smartphone lineup isn’t the best-selling smartphone line in the world. In fact, it’s nowhere close, with recent estimates suggesting that Google sold just 3.9 million Pixel phones globally in 2017. To put that in context, Apple sells more smartphones than that in a single day when new iPhone models first go on sale. But what the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL lack in sales, they make up for in adoration from hardcore Android fans. That makes sense, of course, since Google’s Pixel phones are the only handsets that offer a pure Android experience and receive new software updates as soon as they’re made available.

  • Google Pixel 3 References Spotted In Android Open Source Project (AOSP)

    Google has already released the Android P developer preview, giving developers access to software that would run the Google Pixel 3 devices. The search engine giant hasn’t yet officially confirmed the existence of third-generation Pixel phones, neither have there been too many Google Pixel 3 leaks. But folks at XDA Developers have found first references to Google Pixel 3 in the Android Open Source Project (AOSP).

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The Open Brand Project—we asked for help, and we got it.

    The Open Brand Project is a collaborative effort to evolve our corporate logo and brand system. A cross-functional team of in-house designers collaborating with Pentagram, a well-known international design consultancy, are working together to simplify and modernize our logo.

  • Unified Container Monitoring and Security on OpenShift with Sysdig

    The Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform helps developers easily and quickly develop, build, and deploy container-native applications in nearly any infrastructure, public or private. But as you move from development to a large scale production environment, monitoring and security take center stage.

  • F27-20180404 updated Live isos released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.15.14-300 kernel.

    This set of updated isos will save about 929 MB of updates after install.  (for new installs.)

  • Yum Command Line Options
  • DNF 3: better performance and a move to C++

    It has only been a few years since DNF replaced Yum as the default Fedora package-management tool; that was done for Fedora 22 in 2015, though DNF had been available for several earlier Fedora releases. Since that time, DNF development has proceeded; it started a move from Python/C to all C in 2016 and has made multiple releases over the years. From an outsider's perspective, no major changes seem necessary, which makes the announcement of DNF 3, and a move to C++, a bit surprising to some.

    For many years, Yum was the package-management front-end for many RPM-based distributions, including Fedora and RHEL. But it suffered from poor performance and high memory use; part of that was attributed to its iterative dependency solver. DNF was meant to fix those problems. It uses the libsolv dependency resolution library developed by openSUSE, by way of the hawkey library.

    Though it wasn't a perfect drop-in replacement for Yum, DNF did replace it. But, even though DNF performed better, often much better, than its predecessor, the project continued to focus on making it faster. Ultimately, that's a large part of the reasons behind DNF 3.

  • Fedora 28 beta is ready for you to test

    Fedora 28 has just been released in its beta version. That means it isn’t likely to be completely free of bugs and that you have a chance to participate in ensuring that it’s ready to go public on May 1.

    This news won’t be particularly surprising to the more enthusiastic Fedora users. Fedora’s release cycle is a fairly regular after all. Every six months, more or less, a new Fedora release is published. Many Fedora users have come to expect to see them around May Day and Halloween each year. Yet, while not surprising, the news is still exciting because of a number of new and enhanced features.

Bluestar Gives Arch Linux a Celestial Glow

Filed under
Reviews

Using most any Arch Linux distro usually involves balancing the desire for hands-on control of the operating system from scratch against the attraction of convenient installation and maintenance processes. Bluestar Linux is one of the few Arch distros that gets the balancing act right.

Bluestar Linux is a GNU/Linux distribution that features up-to-date packages, an impressive range of desktop and multimedia software in the default installation, and a live desktop DVD. The live session capability is one of Bluestar's more enticing qualities.

The live session feature lets you easily check out its operation on your own hardware before actually installing the OS to your hard drive. Even better, the installation uses the Calamares installer for a smooth, automated setup. Most other Arch installations require manual installations that involve a command line nightmare. Often that leaves hopeful users frustrated when critical components fail to work on their gear.

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Software: Weblate, GraphicsMagick, Curl, projectM

Filed under
Software
  • Weblate 2.20

    Weblate 2.20 has been released today. There are several performance improvements, new features and bug fixes.

  • GraphicsMagick – A Powerful Image Processing CLI Tool for Linux

    GraphicsMagick is a free open source, modern and powerful software suite for processing images. It was initially derived from ImageMagick, however, over the years, it has grown to be a fully independent project, with a number of improvements and additional features. It runs on all Unix-like operating system such as Linux, MacOS, and also runs on Windows.

    It offers a useful and efficient assortment of tools as well as libraries that allow for reading, writing, and manipulating your images in more than 88 well known formats (such as GIF, JPEG, JPEG-2000, PNG, PDF, PNM, and TIFF).

  • curl another host

    Sometimes you want to issue a curl command against a server, but you don't really want curl to resolve the host name in the given URL and use that, you want to tell it to go elsewhere. To the "wrong" host, which in this case of course happens to be the right host. Because you know better.

  • An introduction to projectM

    Many people have seen music visualizations before, whether in a music player on their computer, at a live concert, or possibly on a home stereo system. Those visualizations may have been generated using the open-source music-visualization software library that is part of projectM. Software-based abstract visualizers first appeared along with early MP3 music players as a sort of nifty thing to watch along with listening to your MP3s. One of the most powerful and innovative of these was a plugin for Winamp known as MilkDrop, which was developed by a Nullsoft (and later NVIDIA) employee named Ryan Geiss. The plugin was extensible by using visualization equation scripts (also known as "presets").

    Sometime later, a project to implement a cross-platform, MilkDrop-compatible, open-source (LGPL v2.1) music visualizer began: projectM. The main focus of the project is a library (libprojectM) to perform visualizations on audio data in realtime—using the same user-contributed script files as MilkDrop—along with reference implementations for various applications and platforms. The project, which began in 2003 and was first released in 2004, is of interest to many for its creative and unique visuals, its use by media-player projects, and its interesting design and features. After years of development and contributions, the project stalled, but now there are efforts to rejuvenate and modernize the code.

Mozilla: Facebook Containers, Extensions, MDN, Fluent, WebXR

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Facebook Container extension now includes Instagram and Facebook Messenger

    To help you control the amount of data Facebook can gather about you, we have updated the Facebook Container extension to include Instagram and Facebook Messenger. This way, users of these sites, can also benefit from the tracking protections of the Facebook Container.

  • What Makes a Great Extension?

    We’re in the middle of our Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge and we’ve been asking ourselves: What makes a great extension?

    Great extensions add functionality and fun to Firefox, but there’s more to it than that. They’re easy to use, easy to understand, and easy to find. If you’re building one, here are some simple steps to help it shine.

  • Results of the MDN “Internal Link Optimization” SEO experiment

    Our fourth and final SEO experiment for MDN, to optimize internal links within the open web documentation, is now finished. Optimizing internal links involves ensuring that each page (in particular, the ones we want to improve search engine results page (SERP) positions for, are easy to find.

  • Why Fluent Matters for Localization

    In case you don’t know what Fluent is, it’s a localization system designed and developed by Mozilla to overcome the limitations of the existing localization technologies. If you have been around Mozilla Localization for a while, and you’re wondering what happened to L20n, you can read this explanation about the relation between these two projects.

    With Firefox 58 we started moving Firefox Preferences to Fluent, and today we’re migrating the last pane (Firefox Account – Sync) in Firefox Nightly (61). The work is not done yet, there are still edge cases to migrate in the existing panes, and subdialogs, but we’re on track. If you’re interested in the details, you can read the full journey in two blog posts from Zibi (2017 and 2018), covering not only Fluent, but also the huge amount of work done on the Gecko platform to improve multilingual support.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Progressive WebXR

    Imagine you wanted to have your store’s web page work in 2D, and also take advantage of the full range of AR and VR devices. WebXR will provide the foundation you need to create pages that work everywhere, and let you focus on compelling User Experiences on each of the devices.

    In a recent blog post, we touched on one aspect of progressive WebXR, showcasing a version of A-Painter that was adapted to handheld AR and immersive VR. In this post, we will dive a bit deeper into the idea of progressive WebXR apps that are accessible across a much wider range of XR-supported devices.

    The WebXR Device API expands on the WebVR API to include a broader range of mixed reality devices (i.e., AR/VR, immersive/handheld). By supporting all mixed reality devices in one API, the Immersive Web community hopes to make it easier for web apps to respond to the capabilities of a user’s chosen device, and present an appropriate UI for AR, VR, or traditional 2D displays.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Who really owns an open project?

    Differences in organizational design don't necessarily make some organizations better than others—just better suited to different purposes. Any style of organization must account for its models of ownership (the way tasks get delegated, assumed, executed) and responsibility (the way accountability for those tasks gets distributed and enforced). Conventional organizations and open organizations treat these issues differently, however, and those difference can be jarring for anyone hopping transitioning from one organizational model to another. But transitions are ripe for stumbling over—oops, I mean, learning from.

  • Nginx gets granular on managed microservices

    Open source at its heart and essentially a web server technology, Nginx (pronounced: engine X) is the company that would like to have its name capitalised in the media but can’t, because it’s not an acronym.

  • Slack competitor Spectrum released as open source group messaging platform

    Spectrum, a group communication platform that launched last year, has gone fully open source, according to an announcement from developer Max Stoiber. The software, which is hosted on GitHub, is licensed under a 3-clause BSD license.

    In contrast to other commercial projects in which open sourcing is a goodwill gesture prior to the end of active development—such as with the opening of webOS following the abrupt discontinuation of the HP TouchPad—Spectrum appears very much ready to react to tickets and pull requests on GitHub. Spectrum's existing hosted option will continue to be offered even after the release of the code.

  • Netflix open source FlameScope CPU tool helps developers debug performance issues

    Netflix's cloud performance engineering team has released FlameScope, a performance visualization utility that allows programmers and system administrators to analyze CPU activity by generating a subsecond-offset heat map in which arbitrary spans of time can be selected by the user for further analysis by selecting a portion of the heat map, for which a flame graph is generated for corresponding block of time.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.

Beginner Friendly Gentoo Based Sabayon Linux Has a New Release

The team behind Sabayon Linux had issued a new release. Let’s take a quick look at what’s involved in this new release. Read more