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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Intel Sandy Bridge Gains On Linux 3.17 Extend Beyond Graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Acer Offers New Desktop Chromebox Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:36pm
Story Android in-dash IVI device revs up in India Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Orca 3.14 Beta 1 Features Major Changes and Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 7:10pm
Story Leaked images of Elephone P1000 – The OnePlus Killer loaded with CyanogenMod Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 6:55pm
Story Exclusive: Elephone P1000, Snapdragon 801, 2K and CyanogenMod! Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:37pm
Story Ken Starks to Keynote At Ohio LinuxFest Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:23pm
Story Mesa 10.3 release candidate 1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:09pm
Story Canonical Joined The Khronos Group To Help Mir/Wayland Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 5:03pm
Story Local Motors: Cars Should be Open Source Hardware Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2014 - 4:56pm

Evolution – The Default Email Client for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

acurrie.wordpress: The original plan for my spiffy new Eee PC netbook was to dump my email archives on it, but the bundled email client for most Ubuntu-based Linux distributions is Evolution, an app I’ve never tried before.

Cray sells Opteron-Linux super to Swiss boffins

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: The Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) in Lugano has coughed up some serious Swiss francs to buy a Cray 141.6 teraflops XT5 system, dubbed Monte Rosa.

Linux Action Show - 3 Years Old

Filed under
Linux

StormOS Enters Beta

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: A beta version of StormOS has emerged, which is a desktop distribution that is based upon the Nexenta Core Platform that in turn is derived from OpenSolaris but with an Ubuntu user-land.

building brand together

Filed under
KDE
OSS

aseigo.blogspot: There are many reasons given for desktop Linux not "taking off". Some are accurate, others considerably less so. One of the challenges we face with KDE is creating a meaningful, visible brand that people value and relate to on an emotional level.

No. 2 IT distributor: No Linux netbooks for you

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Netbook shipments are up "in the triple-digit percentiles" over a year ago, said Brian Davis, vice-president of client systems for Tech Data. But he said Tech Data has seen "almost no" demand for Linux netbooks.

Linux Makes the Grade in California Schools

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: A few growing pains aside, a Linux deployment in a Santa Rosa, CA elementary school district is maturing robustly, letting teachers and students stand apart from their previous dependence on Microsoft Windows while they try on new open software attitudes.

AbiWord - the underestimated word processor

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: When someone tells you to name a word processor, you'll most likely say Microsoft Word, maybe OpenOffice Write, seldom WordPerfect, but almost never AbiWord.

Windows 7 vs. Linux: Beyond Thunderdome

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

pcworld.com: "Listen all! This is the truth of it. Fighting leads to killing, and killing gets to warring. And that was damn near the death of us all. Look at us now! Busted up, and everyone talking about hard rain! But we've learned, by the dust of them all... Bartertown learned. Now, when OSes get to fighting, it happens here! And it finishes here! Two OSes enter; one OS leaves."

OpenSolaris Still Shines

Filed under
OS

informationweek.com/blog: With all the gloom-and-doom about Sun in the air, it almost went unnoticed that they have a new rev of OpenSolaris out in the wild. I took a quick end-user-experience peek.

More powerful Python testing techniques

Filed under
Linux

Python testing reporting features that let testing support more and more powerful techniques

Studio Dave Tests Ubuntu Studio 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: I need at least one i386 installation here at Studio Dave because some production software is not yet 64-bit ready, and I happen to need that software. Thus began my most recent series of trials and tribulations with Ubuntu.

Happy Birthday, Mozilla - and Thanks for Being Here

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Seven years ago, Mozilla 1.0 was launched. The Mozilla project was originally a browser *suite*, which included an email reader and a chat client as well as a browser.

Chrome on Linux: Rough, fast & promising

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I'd been waiting for Chrome on Linux since Chrome first showed up. Chrome, if you haven't tried it, is the speed-demon of Web browsers. I love it. But, until now, there really wasn't a version that would run natively on Linux.

GIMP Animation Package 2.6.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GAP 2.6.0 is a stable release of the video menu intended for use with the GIMP 2.6.x series. This release contains updates for video encoding/decoding, undo support for the storyboard feature and fixes for better compatibility with the GIMP 2.6.x releases.

Firefox 3.5: How Soon and How Big a Deal?

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0 is not quite a year old, but users are already clamoring for Firefox 3.5. So where is it, and what is it all about?

Resellers to trial Red Hat Enterprise Linux V5.3

Filed under
Linux

crn.com.au: HP has partnered with Red Hat to develop a solution for RISC Migration projects. The solution offers Red Hat Enterprise Linux running on HP BladeSystems.

Novell - On the way to becoming a Linux business?

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: Novell's recently released figures for the second quarter of 2009 showed an 8.5 per cent drop in sales compared to the previous year – not a big surprise in light of the much debated economic crisis. However, one area of the business has enjoyed constant, indeed double-digit, growth over the last few years – Linux.

GNU Linux - Pros & Cons

Filed under
Linux

gauravlive.com: As with all things, GNU Linux too has pros & cons. Here I will try to give you a rough idea of both the sides of GNU Linux, so you can decide whether to take the plunge.

Winning the war won't secure peace for open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: Open source may have won the argument, but that does not mean the world will now change, says Mark Taylor.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

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When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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