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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Personal Organizer for GNOME using Getting Things GNOME
  • Installing CentOS from livecd
  • Update a fresh Sabayon 5.4 Installation
  • Ubuntu: How to erase CD-RW/DVD-RW from Command-line
  • Create an UI using Qt Designer in less than 10 minutes
  • Graphical toolkit for MySQL database developers and administrators
  • How to grant limited access to your server
  • How to install Skype and Ekiga Softphone in ubuntu
  • Video Configuration for My New Monitor
  • Move Gnome Pop-up Notification to Other Corner of Screen
  • Easily install applications from within Firefox with Appnr
  • How to Batch Process Files in Gimp
  • Monitor or Change CPU Frequency / Speed in Ubuntu
  • Transfer Installed Packages to New Computer or Drive in Ubuntu 10.10

Why I use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Why I use (and love) Ubuntu
  • Ten worst things about Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu and the Boy Scouts of America
  • Ubuntu Bug Fix Wishes for 2011

Open Source Contribution Etiquette

Filed under
OSS

tirania.org/blog: Some developers, when faced with fixing, or adding a feature to an open source project are under the mistaken impression that the first step before any fixing takes place, or before adding a new feature takes place is to make the code "easier for them" to work on.

FCM#44 is HERE

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Full Circle Magazine #44 Available
  • Linux Outlaws 183 - Darkfield Lasers (The Year 2010 in Review)

Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us

Filed under
Sci/Tech
  • Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us That Didn’t Happen in 2010
  • Top 10 Things Science Fiction Promised Us That DID Happen in 2010

Two Non-buntu Alternatives for your Netbook - Part 2: ArchOne

Filed under
Linux

all-things-linux.blogspot: Yesterday we looked at Fluxflux-sl for a Slax based solution. Today is the turn of ArchOne. As the name says a customization of Arch Linux specifically aimed at use on netbooks.

2011

System76: Bringing Linux to the desktop, 1 stupid-fast computer at a time

Filed under
Hardware

zdnet.com: The netbooks were perfectly nice,and represented a solid choice for schools. However, System76 also sent me a high-performance, consumer-oriented laptop to evaluate in the broader context of desktop Linux.

5 reasons to try Zorin OS Linux

itworld.com: If you're looking to get a taste of Linux, but reluctant to leave what’s familiar, you can have your cake and eat it too.

The H Year: 2010's Wins, Fails and Mehs

Filed under
News

h-online.com: Welcome to The H's look back at 2010. We've broken down the events of the year by what The H thinks was full of win, who was getting on the failboat and what made us just say "Meh".

Ubuntu 10.10 few weeks in

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.10 Linux Desktop Edition Few Week Review
  • I Love Ubuntu – And Here's Why
  • Jack Valenti on Ubuntu

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Activity Journal getting a new View
  • A New Video Highlighting Unigine's OilRush Game
  • "Put it there and wait for users to break" isn't a valid QA method
  • Bodhi Linux Get Software Page Goes Live
  • [kernel] Linux Kernel with BFS
  • Installing Fedora on the Aspire One (D255)
  • Android trojan collects personal data
  • Android tablet GPL summary
  • Drupal 7.0 RC 4 Released
  • Mozilla Says Its Time To Create Firefox 4 Add-Ons Now
  • Announced: FreeBSD 8.2-RC1 and 7.4-RC1
  • updated: ubuntu and fedora wallpaper pack [official wallpapers]
  • And Then Along Comes Larry….
  • What we should really be working on
  • 2010 Trend Watch Update: Global Internet Censorship
  • Net Neutrality 2011: What Storms May Come
  • mplayer and screen, in a fight to the death
  • Parted Magic 5.8 Screenshots
  • FLOSS Weekly 146: Tiki Wiki CMS Groupware

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding Signals
  • Tracing System Calls with strace
  • Emacs 30 Day Challenge: Get the latest gnus to improve speed
  • How to find the exit code of the last executed command using ?
  • Different sections of manpages
  • KernelCheck – Take the guess work out of custom kernel compiles
  • TIP: Getting rid of common errors in chroot mode
  • TIP: Compiling 2.6.33 and above kernels on Debian Lenny
  • The perfect light Debian with Fluxbox [Updated]
  • HOWTO: Lookup Symbol Name and Address during Linux Kernel Debugging

Two Non-buntu Alternatives for your Netbook - Part 1: Fluxflux-sl

Filed under
Linux

all-things-linux.blogspot: Chances are several of you, or somebody close to you, got a new netbook over the festive period, and now you are faced with the agonising question what to put on it to make it usable.

6 Free Linux-Friendly Office Suites For Getting The Job Done

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Many people install Linux on their machines for its simplicity, believe it or not. Here’s a selection of completely free work-related tools that you may or may not have heard about.

Also: KOffice 2.3.0 Office Suite Released

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

russellhollander.com: I use Linux in my personal computing for about 95% of what I do. I thought I would take a minute to articulate why I have chosen to be a Linux user. Whatever your reasons are for sticking with Windows or Mac, here’s why I chose a third path.

How to move from OpenOffice.org to LibreOffice: A message to localizers & International communities

Filed under
LibO
OOo

standardsandfreedom.net: These past days I was contacted by several leads of native-language teams of OpenOffice.org who asked me this question: How can we start to work on the localization of LibreOffice?

Who wrote 2.6.37

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: The 2.6.37 development cycle is coming to a close; that must mean that it is time to look at the development statistics for this release. 2.6.37 has been a more active cycle than most. The most active contributors this time around were:

Get Slack!

Filed under
Slack

go2linux.org: If you follow this blog, you know that I’ve been using Slackware for more or less three months now, Slackware as you may already know is the oldest surviving Linux distribution.

The Interesting Tale Of AMD's FirePro Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: AMD announced twice this year optimizations to their FirePro driver software, but in reality these "optimizations" were largely unsustainable and not optimizations as much as they were attempting to address driver regressions from the past.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?