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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

The Linux ‘weakbook’ bites back

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I was pointed toward an interesting article recently that centered on a competitive battle of netbooks v. smartphones, indicating the latter will emerge victorious. However, will the smartphone really kill the netbook? Nah. Here’s why:

A few good reasons to switch to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

omegamormegil.wordpress: Here’s a list of a few of the reasons I think you might want to take a look at Ubuntu.

A Geek’s Guide: How To Pimp Your Car With Linux

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: If you’ve just started using Linux, you’ve probably noticed an interesting phenomenon. You’ve entered a group of rugged individualists, non-conformists, people who know how to pull things apart and put them back together, people who don’t like being spoon fed. Just using Linux in your PC? Ok, that’s pretty good. But how about building a Linux system from scratch? Or on your phone? Even better, how about in your car?

Red Hat CEO Whitehurst Talks About Slowdown, Virtualization, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

informationweek.com: In an exclusive interview, Red Hat's Jim Whitehurst opens up about the open source software firm's short-term prospects in troubled times and longer-term opportunities for growth.

Open source is not all about the money

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: Dave Rosenberg is worried about Sun. “If it fails,” he writes, “Sun will be the harbinger of sorrow for the rest of the open source world.” The open source business, yes. The open source world? Not so much.

Tron sequel already in production

Filed under
Movies

theregister.co.uk: Tron - quite possibly the best example of a movie that could benefit from a legitimate sequel - is finally getting one. And who knew? A few dedicated - and better informed - film buffs maybe. But for the rest of us sci-fi supporters, certainly on this side of the Pond, it remained a secret.

Yo Frankie!, Now Shipping!

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: One of the most highly anticipated open source games of 2008 is finally shipping. After several months of development and unexpected delays, Blender Institute's Yo Frankie! has been unleashed for the world to play.

Mandriva reports its 3rd Quarter results

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: Mandriva today reported its financial and operating results for the third quarter 2008. Turnover for the quarter is 0.83 million Euros, trading revenue is 1.04 million Euros, costs are 1.67 million Euros and the operating loss is 0.64 million Euros.

Three things I like about Ubuntu Intrepid, and one I don’t

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: Intrepid. There is very little evidence of the “wow” factor that made early Ubuntu releases so exciting. Unless of course you dig a little deeper. There are three that really stand out for me.

Ubuntu for the Holidays

Filed under
Ubuntu

practical-tech.com: You’ve already got Ubuntu on your computer so why not have some Ubuntu under your Christmas tree-or Hanukkah bush, Ubuntu’s for everyone-as well.

20+ Firefox Plugins to Enhance Your YouTube Experience

Filed under
Moz/FF

mashable.com: There is no arguing that YouTube is the most popular video sharing site out there, but that isn’t to say that there aren’t things about it that annoy users. There are a wide array of plugins for Firefox to make the YouTube user experience that much better. Here are over 20.

Also: Trick Out Your Firefox Browser with Style

MSI GeForce 9800GT 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For Linux desktop users interested in a mid-range discrete graphics card there are more choices than ever before with NVIDIA continuing to release new stable Linux drivers as they have done for many years. We recently looked at AMD's new ATI Radeon HD 4830 mid-range graphics card, but in this article we are comparing it to the NVIDIA GeForce 9800GT.

OSS Reloaded

Filed under
Software

yatsite.blogspot: 2008 was without doubt a very exciting year. Open Source keeps stirring the still waters of IT industry. So, let's see which major applications made major releases this year:

Business vs. FOSS: Six Pressure Points

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: The question of whether business can co-exist with free and open source software (FOSS) was settled long ago. It can, and not only successful companies like Red Hat but also the willingness of venture capitalists to fund FOSS business models proves the case.

The Microsoft-Novell Linux deal: Two years later

Filed under
SUSE

infoworld.com: Two years ago this month, Microsoft forged its controversial partnership with Novell that, among other things, had the two companies agreeing not to sue each other over intellectual property issues, in part to protect Suse Linux users over any patent litigation from Microsoft. Just how well has that deal worked out?

The Linux Licensing Labyrinth

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: The land of open source software is awash in an often confusing array of various licenses and rules regarding what is and is not allowed once someone has written a piece of code. It's enough to scare some vendors away from FOSS altogether.

First Experience of Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

cikguafiq.blogspot: I am not the most experienced of Linux users, deep down a am a Windows fanboy. However I have an old laptop that is generally useless with anything other than browsing the Internet or doing some basic work. It was never going to be a gaming machine so I figured Linux offers everything I need + it should perform better than XP.

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on an Ubuntu 8.10 server.

Linux: for all things great and small

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Most of us get a chance to see Linux in action at the desktop or single server level. Some of us use Linux on mobiles and other little gizmos without even realising that the penguin is doing the lifting.

Zenwalking

Filed under
Linux

shinywankenobi.wordpress: I’ve tried just about every Linux distro you could mention over the years. In my partial boredom I decided to flip through Distrowatch’s pages and see what I could find to play with. I want something different. Zenwalk… Zenwalk, where the Hell have you been all my life?

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.

Software and Games

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat, Logicalis in digital transformation partnership in Latin America
    PromonLogicalis, a provider of information technology and communication solutions and services in Latin America, and Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced a collaboration that aim to help organizations navigate the digital transformation of their infrastructures to pave the way for cloud and the software-defined technologies, and to advance open source technology awareness in the region. Open source is delivering significant advancements in many areas of technology through community-powered innovation, including cloud computing, mobile, big data, and more. And, as companies embrace modern technology as a competitive advantage via digital transformation efforts, many are turning to open source because of the flexibility and agility it can enable.
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Downgraded by Zacks Investment Research to “Hold”
  • An Easy Way To Try Intel & RADV Vulkan Drivers On Fedora 24
    Fedora 25 should have good support for the open-source Vulkan Linux drivers (particularly if it lands the next Mesa release) while Fedora 24 users can now more easily play with the latest Mesa Git RADV and Intel ANV Vulkan drivers via a new repository. A Phoronix reader has setup a Fedora Copr repository that is building Intel's Vulkan driver from Mesa Git plus the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver re-based from its source (David Airlie's semi-interesting GitHub branch). Fedora COPR, for the uninformed, is the distribution's equivalent to Ubuntu PPA repositories.
  • Meeting users, lots of users
    Every year, I introduce Fedora to new students at Brno Technical University. There are approx. 500 of them and a sizable amount of them then installs Fedora. We also organize a sort of installfest one week after the presentation where anyone who has had any difficulties with Fedora can come and ask for help. It’s a great opportunity to observe what things new users struggle with the most. Especially when you have such a high number of new users. What are my observations this year?

Linux Devices

  • 96Boards SBCs host Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules
    Gumstix announced two SBCs this week, based on Intel Joule and Curie IoT modules and built to 96Boards CE and IE form-factor specifications, respectively. At Linaro Connect Las Vegas 2016, where earlier this week Linaro’s 96Boards.org announced a new 96Boards IoT Edition (IE) spec, Gumstix announced support for 96Boards.org’s open SBC standards with two new single-board computers. Both SBCs will be available for purchase in October.
  • ORWL — First Open Source And Physically Secure PC, Runs Linux And Windows
    ORWL is the first open source, physically secure computer. Using a secure microcontroller (MCU) and an ‘active clamshell mesh’, the device makes sure that nobody breaks the security of the system. Its maker, Design Shift, has also launched a crowdfunding campaign on Crowd Supply.
  • Purism Is Still Hoping To Build A GNU/Linux Free Software Librem Smartphone
    Purism, the startup behind the Librem laptops with a focus on free software and user privacy/freedom, still has their minds set on coming up with a GNU/Linux smartphone. Purism continues selling their high-priced laptops and their Librem 11 is forthcoming as an Intel-based tablet/convertible device with stocking station. Next on their horizon they want to produce "the ideal no-carrier, Free Software phone running a bona fide GNU+Linux stack."