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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tiny Android-powered module targets wearables Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:27am
Story Rygel 0.21.2 Media Server Adds More Samsung Hacks Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:25am
Story LLVM 3.4 Compiler Officially Released With Many Features Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:19am
Story FreeBSD 10, Kali Nuclear Option, and Why Linux Lost? Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:13am
Story Could an Android desktop replace your Windows PC? Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:09am
Story Developers mull adding data nuke to Kali Linux Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:06am
Story Mozilla Bringing Firefox OS to TVs, Tablets, Desktops Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:00am
Story Balky carriers and slow OEMs step aside: Google is defragging Android Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 10:33am
Story VIA Partners With Mozilla For Firefox OS Rianne Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 10:51pm
Story The Latest Benchmarks Of The Linux 3.13 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 8:50pm

Learning about Linux - the easy way

Filed under
Linux

frrl.wordpress: Linux is seen as an alternative to Windows. So if you are one of those who does not want to be “assimilated into the collective” of Microsoft then maybe Linux is for you.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Vs. Unix: The Sins Of The Father?

  • Adobe “Answers” More Linux Questions
  • Gentoo not cutting edge anymore
  • Bash Parameter Expansion
  • Ubuntu misses the memo on Stallman's cloud computing rant
  • OpenGoo delivers the best of CRM and project management
  • Software Freedom Day Report
  • FSF reboots its High Priority list with a grant and call for input
  • Converting .bin/.cue to .iso
  • Norwegians leave their Standards Body in protest
  • Push and pull network filesystems with ccgfs
  • Going Virtual with VirtualBox
  • parallel programming?
  • Gentoo is Doing the Job—Time to Format XP!
  • Typical browser users?

Review: Antix 7.5

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: It’s time once again for a Linux distro review. This month, Antix 7.5 was included on the LXF DVD. It’s another light distro, so I will use the same metrics I used in the Lightweight Linux Throwdown. Antix is based upon Mepis which is, in turn, based upon Debian.

GIMP 2.6 released, one step closer to taking on Photoshop

Filed under
GIMP

arstechnica.com: A new release of the venerable GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) is now available for download. Version 2.6 offers a variety of new features, user interface improvements, and is also the first release to include support for the Generic Graphics Library (GEGL), a powerful, graph-based image editing framework.

Confession: I switched to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

gdickinson.co.uk: I’ve been a Red Hat Linux user for years. As soon as my chosen hardware arrived–a Dell Optiplex 755–I popped in the Fedora 9 DVD, and installed the OS. It happened that at the time, one of my colleagues’ laptops needed to boot to a usable OS. Rather than create a Fedora 9 boot disk, he went with Ubuntu, and reported ATI drivers which worked out-of-the-box.

IE and Firefox down, Safari & Chrome gaining ground

Filed under
Software

tech.blorge.com: The browser debate continues, as a shift in market share for all the “big guys” continues to hold strong. While Internet Explorer still accounts for over 70% of worldwide browser usage, its market share continues to take a nose dive now that steady competition from the likes of Safari and Chrome are looming.

Evaluating the performance of ext3 using write barriers and write caching

Filed under
Linux

hightechsorcery.com: The ext3 filesystem supports write barriers which are designed to allow a filesystem to take advantage of a disk’s write cache without fear of compromising the ingetrity of the filesystem on a power failure or kernel panic. I’ve seen reports that ext3 write barriers have a significant impact on performance.

A new way of sleeping in the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

The new TASK_KILLABLE feature is generally an improvement over the existing options—after all, it is another way to keep from getting stuck with dead processes.

Lancelot Not to be the default KDE menu

Filed under
Software

ivan.fomentgroup.org/blog: I have seen the proposals to replace the default Kickoff menu with Lancelot on a quite a few places now, the latest triggered me to write my stance on the subject.

Also: KDE 4's artwork is really a giant leap forward on all fronts

Linux is Making Me Fat and Lazy

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: Because of Linux I hardly have to lift a finger anymore, and because of it my health is suffering. I rarely hop up and down in a fit of temper, I don't have to drive to the store to buy software, and I don't get the aerobic benefits of spending hours on the phone with tech support, breathing hard and accelerating my heartbeat.

Who writes Linux: Corporate America

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: I'm not sure why the silly notion that "Only .10068% of Linux kernel developers are paid" keeps circulating, but it does. So, let me just say, once and for all, Linux is written, for the most part, by paid software engineers and programmers from major American corporations.

Six Reasons Why Linux Is Right for Small Business

Filed under
Linux

smallbusinesscomputing.com: It seems that every year is supposed to be "the year" for Linux, but nobody ever manages to define what "the year" really means. You can find statistics on Linux adoption from a variety of research firms but all seem skewed to represent whatever agenda that firm is pushing-whether that is Linux adoption rising, falling, or stagnating.

10 must-have Linux office applications

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Does Linux have what it takes to meet the needs of the corporate desktop? Jack Wallen thinks so. Here’s his list of office apps that can handle everything from word processing to project management to data backups.

Opera 9.6 RC 1

Filed under
Software

opera.com: We now have an RC so please look out for any regressions since 9.52. Changes include Fixed error pages when entering unknown protocol, Fixed an issue where custom search engines would not get a favicon, and Fixed an issue where text with specified size suddenly disappears on Qt4 builds.

Distro Review: OpenSUSE 11

Filed under
SUSE

snuxoll.com: I left openSUSE 3 years ago, and for good reason, it sucked. It was buggy, bloated, slow, and horribly unfriendly to use. So let's skip ahead 3 years to the present, openSUSE 11.0 is out and I'm ready to forgive past mistakes and give them another shot.

The Purpose of the Fifth Amendment to the Bill of Rights

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: I'm thinking that we need a few fun classes on the Bill of Rights to the US Constitution. No. Really. If you'll try to pay attention, I'll try to make it enjoyable.

The need to know: Documentation in Linux

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: Documenting the development of open source software is key to keeping it easy to use, but some disagree on its necessity. More often than not, documentation is an afterthought, and is what happens when the interesting bits of a software project are over and done.

What Are My Favorite Linux & OSS Websites?

Filed under
OSS
Web

don-guitar.com: A couple of weeks ago I made a deal with Susan Linton of tuxmachines.org. Lisa and I will write a two part article on why we're using Linux and why we've chosen the distros we use in return for having Susan write the Linux section of our ezine for one (possibly two) issues.

5 Best Free/Open-source Turn-based Strategy Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: After recommending those excellent real-time strategy (RTS) games for Linux, let's move on to this other type of strategic gaming referred to as turn-based.

Ubuntu Lunacy

Filed under
Ubuntu

insanelyabsurd.com/blog: We’re all pretty familiar with the how popular Ubuntu has become since it first started, but believe it or not there are actually still some people out there who choose to instead bash it because their distro flat out sucks. I’m not going to go into any of the names of the distro’s.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box