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Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story CAINE 7 released: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:54pm
Story 7 Great Geeky Christmas Present Ideas Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:20pm
Story Manjaro Linux 15.12 "Capella" RC1 Is Out, Includes Linux Kernel 4.4 RC4, Wine 1.8 RC3 Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:18pm
Story FOSS projects and their legal structures Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:15pm
Story ZeroDB, an end-to-end encrypted database, is open source! Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:05pm
Story 5 Fabulous Lightweight Linux Laptops Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 10:01pm
Story Raspberry Pi based 3D printer has huge build space Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 8:06pm
Story Canonical Patches Critical OpenSSL Vulnerabilities in All Supported Ubuntu OSes Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 7:55pm
Story Linux Mint 17.3 Officially Released – Ship With Cinnamon 2.8 and MATE 1.12 Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 7:52pm
Story 9 affordable Arduino-powered robot kits Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2015 - 7:44pm

Penguin chief: Linux patent and copyright FUD 'not relevant'

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Fear ye not, Linux faithful. Thy software is no more susceptible to patent or copyright attack than any other piece of closed source software.

Mozilla Accelerates Firefox 5 Release Schedule

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla Accelerates Firefox 5 Release Schedule, Versioning
  • First Firefox 6 build next week, Firefox 7 by May
  • Firefox 4: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

How To Save Traffic With Lighttpd's mod_compress (Debian Squeeze)

Filed under
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to configure mod_compress on a Lighttpd web server (on Debian Squeeze). mod_compress allows Lighttpd to compress files and deliver them to clients (e.g. browsers) that can handle compressed content which most modern browsers do. With mod_compress, you can compress HTML, CSS, Javascript, text or XML files to approx. 20 - 30% of their original sizes, thus saving you server traffic and making your modem users happier.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS 2010 E17 Review
  • Wishlist for gnome (and shell) 3.2
  • Yahoo: The Linux Company
  • Dual boot adventures
  • Linux 2.6.39-rc2 Is Uncommonly Calm
  • There's a new sudo in town
  • Harvard Business Review: FOSS Has Reached Tipping Point
  • Focusing on what's important, not sensational
  • Screen queens: 7 dual-screen devices you can buy now
  • GIMP 2.8 release planning gets more transparent
  • 8 strange places to find USB ports
  • Nokia confirms Symbian no longer open source
  • Testing stable; stable testing
  • OSU, Intel Expand Open Source Education
  • The GNU/Linux-Adoption Algorithm!
  • New OOo Snapshot
  • 10,000-core Linux supercomputer built in Amazon cloud
  • MS's Monopoly Is Now So Bad That Even MS Employees Complain
  • IBM bullish on Linux, but will keep DB2 proprietary

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The quick way to PPA
  • xterm white letters on black background
  • How to Make Firefox 4 Look Like Firefox 3
  • How to install Gyachi on ubuntu using PPA
  • Display CPU & Memory Usage on Ubuntu Panel/Unity
  • How to add Quicklists for Opera in Unity
  • for Loop Example
  • Calculate column average using bash shell

Celebrating 20 Years of Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • Celebrating 20 Years of Linux
  • Where Will Linux Be in 20 Years?
  • The 20th Anniversary of Linux

Ubuntu 11.04: is this the end of the road?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 11.04: Is this the end of the road?
  • First Look At Ubuntu Linux 11.04 Beta
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal Beta Review
  • Canonical Commits to Netbooks Over Tablets for Ubuntu
  • Where are Ubuntu servers being used?

Backing up your data in Debian/Ubuntu derived distros

Filed under
Software

utherpendragonfly.wordpress: Today I want to discuss backing up your computer in case of major problems or when your hard drive conks out. Because ALL hard drives will eventually fail, often without much warning.

Opera Barracuda Release Candidate

Filed under
Software
  • Barracuda Release Candidate
  • Opera 11.10 gets HTML5 File API support, IMAP improvements

A disconcerting look at GNOME 3

Filed under
Software
  • Mac in Black: A disconcerting look at GNOME 3
  • First look: GNOME 3.0
  • Drag Me to Shell
  • 10 Things I Love About GNOME 3
  • Gnome 3 Fallback mode - Get your productivity back
  • GNOME 3 is out: will Ubuntu reconsider?

Which Firefox Add-ons Slow You Down the Most?

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Ever Wonder Which Firefox Add-ons Slow You Down the Most?
  • Firefox 4 review – was it worth the wait?
  • Can Mozilla shame Firefox developers to do better?

A shiny new ornament for your Linux lawn: GNOME 3.0

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Although GNOME 3.0 offers a fairly robust desktop, there is one issue that significantly detracts from its reliability. Hardware-accelerated rendering is absolutely essential to creating a modern and competitive desktop computing experience, but the poor state of Linux graphics drivers makes it very difficult.

Happy 20th Birthday, Linux: The Celebrations Begin

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: The Linux Foundation on Wednesday kicked off what will be several months of celebrations in honor of the 20th anniversary of the Linux operating system with a range of festivities and events as well as key news announcements from three of its working groups.

Also: 20 Years of Linux down, and the best is yet to come

The 5 Best Open Source Graphics Programs

Filed under
Software

smallbusinesscomputing.com: If you'd like to create professional work without breaking the bank, I've got five open source graphics apps that will get the job done.

Interview: Charles H. Schulz on LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

tech-faq.com: Anyone who has ever looked for alternatives to Microsoft Office probably knows about OpenOffice.org, a full featured competitor that is completely free. Last year a group of developers left the project to form The Document Foundation and a LibreOffice project.

Falling In Love With 'Sexy' Ubuntu 11.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

muktware.com: I flirted with Ubuntu 11.04 yesterday and found it a bit annoying – a typical user experience when you see massive changes. After spending a night with Natty (and 'she' kept me awake all night) I now know more about this sexy beast.

The GNOME Journal April 2011 Edition

Filed under
Software

Highlights: How We Got Here: Part I of a Design History of GNOME 3 & the Shell, The Two Most Urgent Tasks: Simplicity and a Keyboard, and Fonts in GNOME 3: Cantarell, Tweaking, and Trailblazing.

Linux Mint Xfce Reviewed

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: The LXDE distribution is based on their Ubuntu-derived Mint 10, while this new Xfce distribution is based on their Mint Debian, which is derived directly from Debian without passing through Ubuntu along the way.

Beyond Ubuntu CDs, Ubuntu Devices?

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com: For years, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, has given away CDs of its Linux operating system to anyone who wanted them. That’s given away as in free, no cost, nada. But, all goods things must come to an end.

Future openSUSE Versioning Decided

Filed under
SUSE

ostatic.com: Andreas Jaeger, openSUSE Program Manager at Novell, has announced the results of the future versioning polls.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source, VR, Phabricator, Rust and WebRender

  • Call for Feedback! Draft of Goal-Metrics for Diversity & Inclusion in Open Source (CHAOSS)
    In the last few months, Mozilla has invested in collaboration with other open source project leaders and academics who care about improving diversity & inclusion in Open Source through the CHAOSS D&I working group. Contributors so far include: Alexander Serebrenik (Eindhoven University of Technology) , Akshita Gupta (Outreachy), Amy Marrich (OpenStack), Anita Sarma (Oregon State University), Bhagashree Uday (Fedora), Daniel Izquierdo (Bitergia), Emma Irwin (Mozilla), Georg Link (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Gina Helfrich (NumFOCUS), Nicole Huesman (Intel) and Sean Goggins ((University of Missouri).
  • Introducing A-Terrain - a cartography component for A-Frame
    Have you ever wanted to make a small web app to share your favorite places with your friends? For example your favorite photographs attached to a hike, or just a view of your favorite peak, or your favorite places downtown, or a suggested itinerary for friends visiting?
  • Setting up Arcanist for Mozilla development on Windows
  • Taming Phabricator
    So Mozilla is going all-in on Phabricator and Differential as a code review tool. I have mixed feelings on this, not least because it’s support for patch series is more manual than I’d like. But since this is the choice Mozilla has made I might as well start to get used to it. One of the first things you see when you log into Phabricator is a default view full of information.
  • This Week in Rust 239
    This week's crate is SIMDNoise, a crate to use modern CPU vector instructions to generate various types of noise really fast. Thanks to gregwtmtno for the suggestion!
  • WebRender newsletter #20

Canonical: GNOME Software, Buzzwords, Ubuntu Server, Themes and Zenkit

  • Report from the GNOME Software design sprint
    A couple of weeks ago representatives from across Canonical met in London to talk about ideas to improve the user experience of GNOME Software. We had people from the store team, snap advocacy, snapd, design and from the desktop team. We were also fortunate enough to be joined by Richard Hughes representing upstream GNOME Software.
  • Emerging Trends in Financial Services: IoT, AI and Blockchain
    The answer has its roots at both an infrastructure level, where legacy technology is being replaced with something more akin to what is seen in challengers banks or in technology leaders from Silicon Valley, and in changing mentalities, where a new mindset can be just as important as the technology that’s adopted. Of course, to say that this is simply a technological problem is naive, often, technology implementation is the easy part, with the larger challenge coming with organisational acceptance of the need to change. Often, the case is that an organisation isn’t culturally ready for change, resulting in projects that fail and negatively impact the ability to evolve with an increasingly tumultuous market that is being impacted by regulatory changes and a technology revolution. Mark Baker, Field Product Manager at Canonical, said: “We tend to find that the technology is the easy part once we’ve got the business aligned around a common goal with common sets of objectives and accepting of the change.” However, once an organisation is culturally aligned around a common goal and is accepting of technological change, then it is possible to work with a technology partner like Canonical in order to deploying the technology simple.
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 19 June 2018
    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team.
  • Simple Dark/Light GTK/Gnome Shell Theme for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver)
    There are many dark themes for GTK with a simple and good color scheme. But, I have been looking for a simple dark theme especially for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). I tried many Dark themes on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and my mind was set on Qogir Dark theme. The simple design and the comfort of the dark colors scheme is quite amazing and gives a relief looking for the desktop environment. Qogir comes with a Dark and Light Theme for GTK 2.0 / GTK 3.0 and Gnome Shell. The Dark or the Light theme integration with the default installed applications such as Nautilus file manager, LibreOffice and Mozilla Firefox are quite good.
  • Zenkit: The influence of developer communities in progressing snaps
    Last month, Zenkit published their project management tool as a snap. For those not familiar with Zenkit, they introduced themselves in a guest blog at the time the snap was published which can be read here. Since then, we caught up with Philipp Beck, Full Stack Developer at Zenkit, to discover his opinion on snaps and the publishing experience. Philipp was introduced to snaps via a developer friend of his and could immediately appreciate the potential benefits for Zenkit to pursue and the advantages it would offer their users. For the former, Philipp comments: “The biggest draw for us was the ease at which we could reach a diverse range of Linux users, without having to specifically package Zenkit for each distribution. There are obvious benefits here in terms of time saved in updating multiple Linux packages too.”

OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Updated

  • Tumbleweed Delivers New Kernel, Applications, Plasma, libvirt
    The past week brought a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots and a bunch of new features and improvements for KDE users. Snapshot 20180618 updated just a few packages to include an updated GNU Compiler Collection 7, which fixes support for 32-bit AddressSanitizer with glibc 2.27+. Both perl-File-ShareDir and python-numpy were the other two packages that gave users minor fixes. The snapshots earlier in the week were more KDE centric. Snapshot 20180615 delivered KDE Applications 18.04.2. The updated applications focused on bugfixes, improvements and translations for Dolphin, Gwenview, KGpg, Kig, Konsole, Lokalize, Okular and many more. KGpg no longer fails to decrypt messages without a version header and image with Gwenview can now be redone after undoing them. The Linux Kernel jumped from 4.16.12 to 4.17.1 and fixed some btrfs and KVM issues. The newer kernel also ported an arm fix for HDMI output routing and fixed an atomic sequence handling with spi-nor and intel-spi. The hwinfo package tried a more aggressive way to catch all usb platform controllers with the 21.55 version. Libvirt 4.4.0 added support for migration of Virtual Machines with non-shared storage over Thread-Local Storage (TLS) and introduced a new virDomainDetachDevice Alias. Lenovo, HP and Dell tablets gaining greater support with the updated libwacom 0.30 package. Add support for PostgreSQL-style UPSERT were made available with sqlite3 3.24.0. Other tools like mercurial 4.6.1, snapper 0.5.5 were also updated in the snapshot.
  • OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Jumps On Linux 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Riding Well
    For users of openSUSE's Tumbleweed rolling-release Linux distribution, it's been a very busy month on the update front. Last week openSUSE Tumbleweed already upgraded to the phenomenal KDE Plasma 5.13 release as its default desktop along with KDE Applications 18.04.2.

CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 Released for Those Who Want to Run Linux Containers

Coming about a month after the release of the CentOS Linux 7.5 (1804) operating system for 64-bit (x86_64), 32-bit (i386), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit (ppc64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (ppc64le), and ARM-hfp (armhfp) compatible machines, CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is now available to download. CentOS Atomic Host 7.5 (7.1805) is built from standard CentOS Linux 7 RPMs and the upstream packages included in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Atomic Host 7.5 operating system. CentOS Linux is a free and open-source computer operating system for desktops and servers that's always based on the latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases. Read more