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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME's Zeitgeist Finally Nears v1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 7:55pm
Story OpenSSL site defacement involving hypervisor hack rattles nerves (updated) Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 7:43pm
Story eBook Reader and Editing Software Calibre 1.18 Is Almost Perfect Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 7:26pm
Story 27-inch Android all-in-one sports 2560 x 1440 pixels Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 7:14pm
Story Intel's 2014 Android ambitions embrace 64-bit, more tablets Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 2:24pm
Story AnthraX Linux Kernels Remain Closed Source Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 2:19pm
Story The bumpy road ahead for Android tablets in 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 2:15pm
Story Schools Continue to Drive Chromebook Sales Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 2:05pm
Story AMD Gizmosphere Support Comes To Coreboot Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2014 - 1:56pm
Story Why Do Users Choose KDE? Roy Schestowitz 2 04/01/2014 - 12:07pm

10 Cool Products For An Open Source World

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

crn.com: From mobile phones to network infrastructure to fun desktop applications, here's a look at 10 products that embrace Linux and other open source ways of life.

easys GNU/Linux 4.2 released

Filed under
Linux

easys GNU/Linux 4.2 has been released and ships the latest KDE Desktop (version 4.1.1) which makes use of QT4. QT3/KDE3-Apps can still be launched with a compat library.

The previous office suite Softmaker Office has been replaced by KOffice which offers enhancements and new functionality like a presentation program. A current version of the Firefox web browser is included.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Omega 10 Desktop Linux

  • When Linux goes bad: the e1000e Ethernet bug
  • What Microsoft Still Does Not Get
  • Open source and the blame game
  • OpenSolaris Granularity
  • Howto: Burn ISO to cdrom from command line
  • What happened to Gentoo?
  • Ubuntu up and running on Pandora
  • OpenOffice.org Power Tools
  • Interview: John VanDyk, Author of Pro Drupal Development
  • Ubuntu vs Windows 2-1
  • Another Open Source Feather In Microsoft's Cap
  • Mini-Review: Asus Eee PC 1000 vs. MSI Wind
  • Review: SuperTux 0.1.3

new podcasts

Filed under
Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Configuring an Apache Linux Server

  • Control Apache with the apachectl command
  • Unix 101: File Attributes
  • Simplify email with Smail
  • Compiz without fglrx on openSUSE 11.1
  • HowTO: Edit Boot Loader to add/modify/delete entries in openSUSE

Plasma slides and a cast

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Working on a set of presentations for a corporate project, Sebastian and I put together some content covering KDE and Plasma topics over the weekend. We thought it would be cool to share some of the results with you.

Red Hat Linux trumps Unix on TCP price/performance test

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: In a recent independent test, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5 Advanced Platform trumped all other operating systems that process more than 1 million transactions per minute -- and at 22% lower cost than its next closest competitor.

Tools for editing vector graphics in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Over the last decade, vector graphics have gone from being a revolutionary format to a standard method of rendering computer images -- so much so that they are standard in the KDE 4 desktops. This popularity is based on the fact that, because they represent images as mathematical equations -- usually in SVG format. Free software includes a number of options for working with vector graphics.

Java Sound & Music Software for Linux, Part 3

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The Java Sound API contains strong support for MIDI, but I was surprised to find no full-size MIDI sequencers written for Java. Happily, JavaSound's MIDI capabilities are well-exploited by a variety of applications.

Second MEPIS 8.0 Beta Uploaded For Testing

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: Warren has uploaded a second 8.0 beta, MEPIS 7.9.80-beta. MEPIS 8.0 offers up-to-date user applications delivered on top of a Debian Lenny core.

A new image editor for Gnu/Linux

Filed under
Software

Nathive is a libre software image editor, but focusing on usability, logic and provide a smooth learning curve for everyone. The project run over Gnome desktop and everyone can colaborate in it with code, translations or ideas.

How Do Companies Make Money with Linux?

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: Open source enthusiasts believe that better software can result from an open source software development model than from proprietary development models. Of course, others can then recompile that product, basically using your product without charge. Here are a few ways that companies are dealing with that issue:

SilverStone Raven RVM01B Mouse with Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: While SilverStone Technology has long been known for their high-end (and very expensive) computer cases such as the Sugo and Temjin series, as of late they've begun manufacturing other computer peripherals. This here is SilverStone's first computer mouse and we are looking at it today.

openSUSE Enlightenment LiveCD

Filed under
SUSE

lizards.opensuse: Ladies and Gents! Glad to announce the update of unofficial Enlightenment LiveCD based on OpenSUSE-11.0.

Cloud computing is a trap, warns GNU founder Richard Stallman

Filed under
OSS

guardian.co.uk: Web-based programs like Google's Gmail will force people to buy into locked, proprietary systems that will cost more and more over time, according to the free software campaigner.

gOS 3: Is it better than Ubuntu?

Filed under
Linux

howtogeek.com/tuxgeek: Combining the best parts of Mac OS X and Ubuntu, gOS is truly a worthy competitor in the OS wars. It has simplicity, a well designed interface, a rock solid linux core and web apps. But is it good enough? Is it ‘a Linux for the rest of us!’ ?

The Linux Safety Net: Living Fast and Dangerous

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Are we living the fast and dangerous life in Linux just because it's so bullet proof and safe? Think about that. I ask that question because I have honestly found myself in recent months openly ignoring, not consciously mind you, but unconsciously, long held safety and security practices whenever I'm on a Linux or BSD machine.

The Fastest OpenOffice.org Edition

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: OpenOffice.org comes in several editions produced by different groups. Each edition has its own features, performance improvements, bug fixes, and new bugs. Go-oo in particular boasts performance as a feature with its the slogan, "Better, Faster, Freer," but is there truth in advertising?

New GNOME 2.24 is an incremental improvement

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Last week marked the release of GNOME 2.24. Those who already use GNOME will appreciate the new additions, but there's nothing compelling enough in the new version to convince fans of other desktop environments to make a switch.

Linux Distro to Newbies: Adapt or Leave!

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: A uniform computing experience: is it really all that much to ask for? When presenting this question to most experienced Linux users, "choice" often outweighs the idea of a uniform experience. Unfortunately this doesn’t sit with those who just wish to use their computers as they always have.

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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more