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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung docs detail Linux TRIM bug and fix Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 6:42pm
Story Google Play Store/Chrome Web Store Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 6:00pm
Story GitHub rumor confirmed: It raised $250M at $2B valuation Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:55pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:38pm
Story Coverity Report Finds Open Source Code Quality Beats Commercial Code Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:35pm
Story DragonFlyBSD Has Full-Acceleration Now Working For Intel Broadwell Graphics Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:29pm
Story Elive 2.6.8 beta released Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:17pm
Story Leftovers: SysAdmins/Servers Roy Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 5:12pm
Story HP ProBook 455 G2 Ubuntu review: It's dirt-cheap, but this budget laptop may not be your dream come true Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 3:21pm
Story LibreOffice 4.4.5 "Still" Arrives with Over 80 Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 30/07/2015 - 3:11pm

odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Make A Movie Out Of Photos In Ubuntu Using PhotoFilmStrip
  • Judges named for NZ Open Source awards
  • EU: Guide on procurement of open source revised
  • A Glimpse of Ubuntu Desktops in the Financial World
  • Using Open Source to Bootstrap Your Data Service
  • Pocketbook announces color touch screen Android e-reader
  • I Lost the Discs with the drivers
  • Big Brother is searching you
  • Oracle v. Google Timeline at Groklaw
  • IBM Cuts Power Systems Shops a Linux Price Break
  • FOSDEM 2011 Is The 5th & 6th Of February
  • Going Linux - Aug 20: #112 - Linux for Small Business
  • Linux Outlaws 164 - I Love It When a Pod Casts Together

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fix "Ignoring File .save" error in Ubuntu
  • Maybe not-too-neat Apache tricks; Part 1
  • Open Gnome Nautilus As Root
  • Easily Delete Thumbs.db Files From All Directories
  • iPod Touch as a Secondary Display on Linux
  • Console into Sun, Linux and other servers from a Linux box
  • Digup - update md5sum or shasum digest files
  • Debian swirl in Gnome
  • Remote Access in Linux
  • How to enable proxy on opensuse 11.3

More stuff you can, but shouldn’t, do

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: Remember 3ddesktop? Before Compiz was adopted as the messiah of the Linux desktop experience, 3ddesktop was the way cool kids spun their work environments and dazzled their Windows-using friends.

Games resurrected using DOSBox - Part 3

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: It's been a long while since I wrote parts one and two, so I decided to freshen up the collection a bit and add several more titles to the list of successfully tested and played games using DOSBox.

Windows 7 Theme for GNOME

lifehacker.com: Last week, we shared a program that makes your Windows machine look like OS X, and today we feature a similar method to change your Linux GUI to a more familiar Windows interface.

Make use of the KDE 4.5 Clipboard

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

ghacks.net: In this article I am going to introduce you to the Klipper tool contained within the KDE 4.5 desktop.

Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 5 – Dreamlinux

Filed under
Linux

g33q.co.za: Just getting Dreamlinux Installed or running in anything but a VM has been a nightmare. It kernel panicked when booting from a flashdrive, and installation failed repeatedly.

Ubuntu fail

Filed under
Ubuntu

djberg96.livejournal: Only a short time ago I setup my laptop to be a dual boot Ubuntu/Vista system. At first, it worked well. The wireless worked (yay!) and the Ubuntu interface was pretty nice. But, all was not well.

User friendly showdown: Ubuntu 10.04 versus Windows 7

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

techrepublic.com: So recently I have written a lot about how user-friendly Linux has become. Naturally the nay-sayers have spoken loudly and insisted that Linux is far, far behind Windows in the user-friendliness category. So, I decided I wanted to figure out a way to test this argument to see which operating system was, in fact, more user friendly.

Important system tools

Filed under
Software

unixbhaskar.wordpress: In this article I am going to take you to different level of system information. To know more about internals and methods.

BleachBit: A Utility To Clean Up Your Linux System

Filed under
Software
HowTos

makeuseof.com: It’s no secret: many programs fill your hard drive with well-meaning, but useless, crap. From browser caches to install leftovers to logs, computers are full of unnecessary information.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 137

Filed under
SUSE

We are pleased to announce our new openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 137.

Apple Looks To Take Over X Server 1.9 Release Management

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Like the past few X.Org Server releases, Keith Packard will go on to continue being the release manager for this new series. Keith Packard put a call out for anyone interested in serving as Peter's replacement to cut the xorg-server 1.9.x releases and it looks like it will be Jeremy Huddleston, Apple's main X.Org contributor.

A Win-Lin situation: moving a small office over to Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Michael Pope is a pragmatic person by nature - a developer who, before he sets out on a task, takes sufficient care to create a soft-landing in case it is needed. Hence, when he was asked by his employer to convert a small accounting firm from Windows to Linux, it is not surprising that his methods embodied his whole approach to things.

Free Software, Real Profits

Filed under
OSS

fool.com: Socially responsible investing begs the question: Is it financially viable? The same question arises with regard to free, or open source, software. Free software is clearly beneficial to society, but is it good for business?

Mandriva’s future?

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: Recently it became clear that Mandriva was once again in serious financial trouble. Mandriva 2010.1 was even delayed because of that, although not much explanation was given. In the end the company was saved by a new investor, but how things will involve in the more long-term, remains unclear.

Working with KDE desktop effects

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

ghacks.net: In this article I am going to introduce you to the KDE Desktop Effects manager and how to use it to make your KDE desktop experience as sleek as it can be.

Valve rubbishes Linux Steam rumours

Filed under
Gaming

computerandvideogames.com: Valve has taken a Left 4 Dead-style shotgun to rumours that it is working on a Linux compatible version of its Steam platform.

Ubuntu One on KDE – Technical Aspects

Filed under
KDE
Software

apachelog.wordpress: Following my post on Ubuntu One in KDE I would now like to take a closer look at how Ubuntu One works using KDE technologies and what the current state of affairs is. So be prepared for a lot of technical blah...

Putting It All Together

Filed under
Software

modernperlbooks.com: The Perl community gets a lot of things right right now. Consider the CPAN: we expect a few standards of compatibility and kwalitee, but as long as you adhere to rough consensus, your work is useful and usable to a million other Perl programmers.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Two Point Hospital, PLAY WITH ME and More

OSS: HIT, SUSE, FSFE, Meaning of Open, Bell Canada

  • How Open Source, Crowdsourcing Aids HIT Development
    HIT development is important for health IT infrastructure growth as organizations continue to go through their digital transformations. Entities are interested in the most innovative and advanced technology to assist with increased workflows and improve patient care. Open source and crowdsourcing to improve innovation are key to quickly building on technology being developed for healthcare. This is especially true when it comes to newer technology like artificial intelligence (AI) and blockchain. Healthcare organizations and healthcare technology companies cannot simply wait around for advanced technology to develop around them.
  • Open source in the enterprise: Trends and opportunities in 2018
    Some big events are set to come in 2018 – the recently announced Royal Wedding, the football World Cup in Russia and the incoming general data protection regulation (GDPR) to name just a few. And 2018 is also set to be a significant year for business technology. Some of the key trends in enterprise IT will include the continued move to hybrid cloud, the emergence of the container infrastructure ecosystem and ongoing growth in software-defined infrastructure and storage. Most interestingly, we foresee a number of significant open source developments here. So what exactly should we expect to see? And how can IT teams make the most of these emerging opportunities?
  • Keeping an Irish home warm and free in winter
    This issue would also appear to fall under the scope of FSFE's Public Money Public Code campaign. Looking at the last set of heating controls in the house, they have been there for decades. Therefore, I can't help wondering, if I buy some proprietary black box today, will the company behind it still be around when it needs a software upgrade in future? How many of these black boxes have wireless transceivers inside them that will be compromised by security flaws within the next 5-10 years, making another replacement essential? With free and open technologies, anybody who is using it can potentially make improvements whenever they want. Every time a better algorithm is developed, if all the homes in the country start using it immediately, we will always be at the cutting edge of energy efficiency.
  • The Meaning of Open
    Open systems create gravity wells. Systems that are truly open tend to attract others to join them at an ever-accelerating pace. In ecosystems that are ruled by a despot no matter how successful other participants in the ecosystem are, they fundamentally just empower the despot to have more leverage over them, because they have more to lose and their success feeds the despot’s success. In open systems, on the contrary, participants see that they don’t have to fear their own success fueling their own increasing subservience to a despot. Each individual entity who can’t plausibly build their own similarly-sized proprietary ecosystem to compete — the overwhelming majority of entities — is incentivized to pitch in on the open ecosystem. Investment in an open ecosystem by any one entity helps the entire ecosystem as a whole. This fact, combined with the fact that ecosystems generally get exponentially more valuable the more participants there are, means that in many cases over sufficient time scales truly open ecosystems create gravity wells, sucking more and more into them until they are nearly universal.
  • Bell Canada brings open source automation ONAP into production
    Bell Canada has implemented it's first automation use case using the Linux Foundation's Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) as part of the telco's Network 3.0 transformation initiative. With an initial focus on its data center network infrastructure, Bell Canada is working with its network integration and back-office partner Amdocs to reduce costs and delivery capabilities.
  • Bell Canada Reaches Milestone in Network 3.0 Vision with Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) and Strategic Partnership with Amdocs

Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed

  • Linux Kernel 4.15 Delayed Until Next Week as Linus Torvalds Announces a Rare RC9
    While the Linux community was looking forwards to the final Linux 4.15 kernel release today, Linus Torvalds just delayed it for another week, announcing the ninth Release Candidate (RC) instead. It's not every day that you see a ninth Release Candidate in the development cycle of a new Linux kernel branch, but here we go, and we can only blame it on those pesky Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that affect us all, putting billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Linux 4.15 becomes slowest release since 2011
    Linus Torvalds has decided that Linux 4.15 needs a ninth release candidate, making it the first kernel release to need that much work since 2011. Torvalds flagged the possibility of an extra release candidate last week, with the caveat that “it obviously requires this upcoming week to not come with any huge surprises” after “all the Meltdown and Spectre hoopla” made his job rather more complicated in recent weeks. Fast-forward another week and Torvalds has announced “I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it”.
  • No 4.15 final release today
    As might have been expected from watching the commit stream, the 4.15 kernel is not ready for release, so we'll get 4.15-rc9 instead. Linus said: "I really really wanted to just release 4.15 today, but things haven't calmed down enough for me to feel comfy about it, and Davem tells me he still has some networking fixes pending. Laura Abbott found and fixed a very subtle boot bug introduced this development cycle only yesterday, and it just didn't feel right to say that we're done."

Linus Torvalds Calls Linux Patch for Intel CPUs "Complete and Utter Garbage"

The patch submitted by David Woodhouse, ex-Intel kernel engineer that now works for Amazon described a so-called new feature for Intel processors to address Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation (IBRS) by creating macros that would restrict or unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation based on if the Intel CPU will advertise "I am able to be not broken." The "x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation" feature implies that the IBRS (Indirect Branch Restricted Speculation) bit needed to be set at boot time to "ask" the processor not to be broken. Linus Torvalds immediately reacted to the patch calling it "complete and utter garbage" despite the developer's efforts to explain why he implemented the nasty hack. Read more Original: [RFC 09/10] x86/enter: Create macros to restrict/unrestrict Indirect Branch Speculation