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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU founder Stallman calls DRM’d Steam for Linux games "unethical" srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 11:23am
Story Linux Desktops Dominate at Black Hat srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 11:13am
Story Debian Project News - July 29th srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 11:11am
Story PCLinuxOS: A surprise addition to our family computers srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 9:58am
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 467 srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 3:40am
Story Open source won srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 3:39am
Story Valve, Linux and the Windows 8 'Catastrophe' srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 3:36am
Story Red Hat and Canonical 'traitors' srlinuxx 31/07/2012 - 3:32am
Blog entry How Ubuntu can save the Linux Desktop fieldyweb 30/07/2012 - 7:42pm
Story Why Linux will never rule on the desktop srlinuxx 30/07/2012 - 2:10am

Linux a pleasant surprise

Filed under
Linux

intelligencer.ca: I had the opportunity recently to test Linux, the freeware operating system, as a standalone, bootable CD. The version I tried was SimplyMEPIS 7.0, a configuration of the Linux OS and many popular open source programs, with a good graphic user interface (GUI).

Joomla! and the latest trends in the open source revolution

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: Australia's Andrew Eddie and Brad Baker, two of the core team members of Joomla!, the free open-source Internet content management system (CMS) that in three years has grown into a global development community with more than three million downloads in a year, will be guest speakers at a special event in Sydney on May 19, 2008.

PackageKit Critique

Filed under
Software

laserjock.wordpress: If you haven’t heard, PackageKit is an exciting and upcoming project who’s goal is to create a user friendly package handling abstraction layer that is independent of distro and package format. Basically, the Grand Unified Package GUI for those more physics-minded. Sounds good like a good idea.

The Perfect Desktop - Kubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Kubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Dillo the lean browser

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Using browsers which are Web 2.0 enabled whenever you just what to Google something is like calling out the Fire Brigade when you have just burned the toast. Definitive overkill. If you are just surfing for information, then you want the little browser on the low fat, low body-mass index, skinny latte diet with a low carbon footprint.

Open source executive moves: Red Hat, Bitrock, and more

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: People have been changing places within the open-source ranks of late, and I figured I'd note a few that have recently come to my attention:

Btrfs 0.14, Managing Multiple Devices

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "Btrfs v0.14 is now available for download," Chris Mason announced, adding, "please note the disk format has changed, and it is not compatible with older versions of Btrfs."

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gentoo 2008.0 Beta 2 Screenshots

  • gitweb + apache + gentoo
  • Gentoo on a 1&1 vServer
  • Know when to say when on open source
  • Gigabyte AirCruiser N300 Dual on Linux
  • Is the lack of open source drivers driving you mad?
  • Improve Google Earth’s Appearance
  • Control and keep an eye on many VNC sessions at once
  • Quickzi: How To Block Incoming Access to Port 80
  • Categorizing OSS customers
  • Howto: Restore All Installed packages in Ubuntu Hardy Heron and to a New machine
  • Oracle says it’s playing by open source community rules
  • Are You Frustrated With Firefox?
  • Games in the openSUSE Build Service
  • Using OD To Find Bad Characters In Files On Linux Or Unix
  • Deflectors Say There's Something There, Sensors Say There Isn't
  • HowTo: Powerful Metric and Units Linux Conversion Tool

ReiserFS Without Hans Reiser, Continued

Filed under
Reiser

informationweek.com/blog: In my post the other day about whether or not work in the ReiserFS file system would continue after Hans Reiser's murder conviction, I mentioned that this being an open source project, it wouldn't be hard for someone else to pick up where others leave off. And as it turns out, that's precisely what's happening: according to folks on the ReiserFS team, work on ReiserFS will continue.

Also: Threat Level Visits Inmate No. BFPS63 — aka Hans Reiser

on the recent libplasma changes

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: There seems to be some concern amongst users about the massive surgery we did on libplasma this past month. The concern stems from the idea that these changes will work against the stabilization of libplasma and result in prolonging a "beta" quality to plasma itself.

Also: Why there is a lack of understanding the KDE4 Release Schedule?

Asus Forecasts Quarterly Shipments Nearly Doubling for Eee PCs

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: There appears to be no stopping the success Asus is having with its Eee PC subnotebooks. The company is forecasting this week that it will nearly double shipments of the svelte, low-cost machines in the second quarter. Shipments will rise to between 1.2 million to 1.3 million units, the company says, and it expects to move a whopping 5 million units this year. Can we expect the Linux versions to stick around?

Is Linux now a slave to corporate masters?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Does it matter who pays the salaries of Linux kernel developers? If so, how much, and in what ways? Guess which one has been getting the most attention?

Why Linux continues to languish

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: There's an interesting comparison on CNN Money between the Apple MacBook Air, the Everex Cloudbook, and the Sony VAIO Tz 298N. Cost wise the Sony was at the top at nearly 4 grand, while the Everex nailed the low end at $400.

Review: Hackett and Bankwell Issue #1

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: I was lucky to have received my copy of Hackett and Bankwell Issue 1 this week. I saw that there’s a huge penguin on the cover. Yay! Hooray for penguins! Big Grin It’s an interesting way to study using Linux especially Ubuntu.

latest ubuntu posts

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron Release

  • Ubuntu 8.04, “Hardy Heron”: My personal review
  • I'm loving 8.04
  • more Krazy Krashes from Krappy, untested system
  • No, Ubuntu is Open Source.
  • Installing Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron on the HP Mini-Note
  • Trying out Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron on a Toshiba Portege 2010 - how to change the video settings
  • Improved Video with Hardy Heron

Does open source programming make you a criminal?

Filed under
OSS
Humor

blogs.zdnet.com: The New York Times is working on a story saying open source programming makes you a criminal. It just makes sense, he told me during the interview. If blogging kills, then programming must lead to criminality.

9 features I wish Ubuntu had: or why I still prefer PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

alternativenayk.wordpress: I’ve been using Ubuntu 8.04 for about four days now and I must admit that that I still prefer PCLinuxOS 2007 as my favourite entry-level Linux distribution. I’ve compiled a list of 9 features I wish Ubuntu had, which may help me change my mind.

How to Make People Love Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: There are two kinds of Linux people in the world, those that will help people fix their Windows spyware problems, and those that will not. I land squarely in the former camp, and I think that it's important for us all to consider doing the same.

Psystar Open Computer unboxing and hands-on

Filed under
Mac

engadget.com: Engadget NYC might have gotten to play with Apple's latest and greatest iMac yesterday, but we keep it dirty in the Chi -- yep, we've got the first Psystar Open Computer shipped out for review.

Why Microsoft will dump their anti-Linux rhetoric

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Why Microsoft will dump their anti-Linux rhetoric

  • Stop hating Microsoft?
  • Microsoft mulls proxy fight for Yahoo
  • Mozilla warns of Flash and Silverlight 'agenda'
  • Microsoft Gives Backdoor to Law Enforcement -- Well, Not Really
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • M$ Kicks Second Most Loyal Users In The Teeth [Ed: context below]
  • Windows 10 updates are now ruining pro-gaming streams
    Forcing a gaming PC to update mid-game during a livestream to up to 130,000 followers isn’t best advert for the software
  • Containers Used on over Half of New Apps in Production
    Shippable, the Seattle-based producer of a continuous delivery platform for software developers, recently quizzed 300 coders in the U.S. and found that more than half of them (52 percent) are using Docker or other container technologies to deploy their new applications in production. Fourteen percent are using containers for development and testing purposes. Indicating that 2016 is the year that containers cement their hold on the enterprise, a whopping 89 percent of respondents told the startup that they were very or somewhat likely to increase their use of the DevOps-enabling technology within the next 12 months. Developers are turning to containers when speed is of the essence. Containers have helped a majority of developers (74 percent) ship new software at least 10 percent faster. Eight percent are enjoying a 50-percent boost.
  • Divide et Impera
    But for those committed long term to an on premise model, new tactics are required. In a market that is struggling with fragmentation, solutions must become less fragmented. In some cases this will mean traditional formal partnerships, but these can be difficult to sustain as they require time and capital resource investments from companies that are certain to be short on one if not both. History suggests, however, that informal aggregations can be equally successful: the Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP combination, as one example, achieved massive success – success that continues to this day.
  • gNewSense 4.0 released
    I hereby announce the release of gNewSense 4, codenamed Ucclia. It's based on a solid Debian, modified to respect the Free Software Foundation's and is available for 3 architectures: i386, amd64 and mipsel (Lemote Yeeloong).
  • IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux Firewall OS Lands More OpenSSL Security Fixes
    Yesterday we reported news on the release of the IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102 Linux kernel-based firewall distribution, which brought many security patches and improvements, along with updated components. Today, May 5, 2016, we're informing our readers about the immediate availability of IPFire 2.19 Core Update 102, a small maintenance build to the stable IPFire 2.19 distribution that updates the OpenSSL package to version 1.0.2h, fixing a total of six vulnerabilities discovered upstream.
  • Samsung’s Artik 10, starts shipping in the US for $150
    Samsung’s Artik development boards are finally reaching hands of consumers in the US. The Artik development boards which were unveiled back in May 2015 at the IoT World 2015 have taken quite a lot of time to become consumer ready and take over the likes of the new Raspberry Pi 3, Pine 64,etc which have revolutionized the DIY Maker community with the “PC ona board” concept. And now, the Artik 10- the most powerful board from the Artik series is all set to intensify the ongoing competition. Priced at $150, which is more than what one would pay for 4 $35 priced Raspberry Pis, Samsung will sure have to do a lot to of work to impress the buyers and build a community around it.
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • ​Why I Hate Security, Computers, and the Entire Modern Banking System
    I woke up yesterday to find that a string of mysterious credit card payments had wiped out my checking account. I spent the next few hours as a prisoner of the phone tree, being interrogated on the transactions that I wanted answers about. No, I did not have a Banana Republic credit card. I didn’t have a Capital One credit card either. And I had no idea who Michael was, or what he was doing with all my money. The woman on the other end of the phone flagged transaction after transaction. For each one, she read me a long, pre-written paragraph of instructions and disclaimers—verbatim, even if she had repeated the same words just before. “Okay, so,” I said, when she was finally done. “It looks like this person is paying off credit cards through the web. What… am I supposed to do about that? What information do they have that lets them do it?” “It looks like they have your routing number and account number,” she told me. “You should close this account and get a new one.” I thanked her and hung up. Then my head exploded.

Leftovers: Software

  • Cockpit 0.105
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. There’s a new release every week. Here are the highlights from this weeks 0.105 release.
  • Mercurial 3.7 and 3.8
    The Mercurial project continues its fast pace of innovation in version control. Both major releases this year (3.7 and 3.8) have very important new features that promise to improve user experience to a large degree.
  • KDE neon User Edition Testing Survey Results
    We made a tech preview release of KDE neon User Edition 10 days ago and I made up a survey to get results for how people’s experiences were. We got 59 responses, here’s a summary:
  • Blog backlog, Post 1, Emoji
  • Nautilus & Gtk+ status – 1 year of progress
    Today I was having a rough time thinking on how to implement the new GtkPathBar, which is taking more time and frustration than expected given some technological limitations on animations in gtk+ and that responsive design is technologically hard to do.

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!