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Thursday, 21 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 19/06/2009 - 4:09am
Story Social Desktop Contest srlinuxx 1 19/06/2009 - 4:04am
Story Valve To Launch Native Linux Game In July? srlinuxx 19/06/2009 - 12:41am
Story KlamAV: Outstanding KDE front-end for Linux anti-virus srlinuxx 19/06/2009 - 12:39am
Story HP is business Linux friendly srlinuxx 18/06/2009 - 8:29pm
Story Red Hat's Virtualization Plan Enters Next Phase srlinuxx 18/06/2009 - 8:28pm
Story openSUSE Factory is Now Open srlinuxx 18/06/2009 - 8:26pm
Story Amarok 2.2 development, one week in srlinuxx 18/06/2009 - 8:25pm
Story New Firefox Icon: Q&A srlinuxx 1 18/06/2009 - 8:22pm
Story How Do We Introduce FOSS and Linux to Those Who Resist It? srlinuxx 1 18/06/2009 - 7:04pm

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Flock 0.5.11 Released

Filed under
Software

Welcome to the 0.5.11 release of Flock. We've got some new goodies since 0.4.10. Flock 0.5.11 imports your bookmarks, passwords, cookies, etc. from Firefox and other browsers. For each favorite, you can now choose to either store it online or keep it local.

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Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin in Debian Linux

Filed under
Howtos

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well.

Determine the virtual terminal you are using in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever had to determine the virtual terminal that an X session is running on? Perhaps you may want this information for a program you have created.

For Web editors, Nvu is the ticket

Filed under
Software

For home users, free open-source software is the way to go.

This week we'll talk about Nvu (http://www.nvu.com), a free Web page editor that runs on Mac, Windows and Linux. It is a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) editor - you don't have to write lines and lines of obscure code to create a Web page, even if it does help to understand raw HTML to get through some rough spots.

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Fixing Linux with Knoppix

Filed under
HowTos

A bootable disk with Knoppix can be a lifesaver when your computer goes awry. In this feature, we guide you through the process of fixing Linux with Knoppix, which includes repairing boot issues, working with key system files, and working with Linux partitions.

Elive 0.4

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Elive 0.4: "Serenity", featuring both Enlightenment 16 and 17, was released yesterday. "This version is a stabilization of 0.3, a better release with all bad things fixed, but also with many of new features; new installer, with more file systems supported and a cleaner installation." We tested last week's pre-4 and were disappointed in an inoperative harddrive installer. Did we have any better luck with the distribution release?

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Firefox 2.0 To Stress Tab, Bookmark, Extension Changes

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Corp.'s lead engineer isn't worried about Microsoft's upcoming Internet Explorer 7, but instead is focusing on getting the next version of Firefox out the door.

A Look at GNOME 2.14

Filed under
Reviews

Built on the shoulders of giants, GNOME 2.14 hits the shelves on the 15th of March. As well as new features and more polish, developers have been working around the clock to squeeze more performance out of the most commonly used applications and libraries. This is a review of some of the most shiny work that has gone into the upcoming GNOME release.

The Holy Grail of Networking

Filed under
Linux

Recent studies show Linux taking a large and growing share of the global data center market, as well as making incipient gains on the desktop. Traditional IT deployment, however, doesn't tell the whole Linux story -

Also: Running Your Business on Linux

Valley CEOs `bullish' on hiring for 2006

Filed under
Misc

A survey of Silicon Valley's chief executives found 14 percent more said their companies added employees in 2005 compared with the previous year, and they're even more optimistic about hiring in the coming year.

HP sets up Linux 'centre of excellence' in Blighty

Filed under
Linux

HP is stepping up its interest in Linux and has set up a UK centre of excellence for Linux in Reading.

The company is also planning to set up similar centres in mainland Europe and in the US.

Berry Linux v0.67 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Berry Linux, the distribution based off of Fedora Core, has released version 0.67. Inside of this LiveCD is the Linux kernel 2.6.15.4, KDE v3.5.1, Kudzu v1.2.25, hwdata v0.174, and Firefox v1.5.0.1.

The Bourne Again Shell

Filed under
HowTos

The Bourne Again Shell and TC Shell are command interpreters and high-level programming languages. As command interpreters, they process commands you enter on the command line in response to a prompt. This chapter focuses primarily on the Bourne Again Shell, while noting where it differs from the TC Shell.

Scale vs OSBC: Change or Die

Filed under
OSS

You can't plan on going to a community show and then an enterprise show and expect a lot of similarities. That said, despite all of the differences, I found quite a few more things in common than I expected.

Progeny Linux leader takes new job

Filed under
Linux

The founder of the Debian Linux project and of a company called Progeny to commercialize it has taken a new job trying to standardize elements of the open-source operating system.

Blame the Operating System

Filed under
Misc

I have a Microprocessor in my system that can easily handle over 120 million instructions per second. If you like to get real geeky with me, consider this. The Intel processor I'm using is able to calculate the SuperPI number crunching benchmark to one million digits in about 100 seconds. It takes my Pentium 4 system less than two minutes to figure out this benchmark, and the Pentium 4 is notoriously bad at FPU calculations. On a bad day, this beautiful system can do some very serious powered thinking, and at speeds that even ten years ago NASA didn't have in their control rooms.

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