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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat Pursuing Certification For RHEL 6

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Pursuing Certification For RHEL 6, Hypervisor
  • Red Hat (RHT) Price Soars Above the 50-Day Moving Average

KDE 4.5 Trades Revolution for Evolution

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: By the standards of previous releases in the KDE 4 series, KDE 4.5 is tame. It has few new applications, and introduces no new technologies. Yet with its combination of small innovations and interface improvements, KDE 4.5 still manages to be a release worth installing.

Critical Vulnerability Silently Patched in Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: A highly dangerous privilege escalation vulnerability, which can allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code as root from any GUI application, has been patched in the Linux kernel.

Oracle dooms its prospects in open source business

  • Shuttleworth: Oracle dooms its prospects in open source business
  • Oracle OpenSolaris ditch draws developer ire

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Droid X and Fedora
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #206
  • Lightweight Distro Roundup: Day 2 Linux Mint LXDE
  • 10 Things Any Monitoring Software Should Do that Nagios Does
  • Vim editor learns Python 3
  • Palamida Joins Linux Foundation
  • WhiteHouse.gov Expands Open Source Efforts
  • Busyhot - Neat CPU Load/Temp Applet
  • Behind KDE: Ingo Malchow, the Guy Behind KDE Websites
  • fedoracommunity.org website design progressing
  • Larry Lessig's new journey (part one)

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Background a running process
  • Booting from a btrfs filesystem in a GPT-partitioned USB flash drive attached to a non-EFI system
  • How To Stop Firefox From Auto Resizing
  • Extracting information out of your hard disk
  • Debugging ARM programs inside QEMU
  • Easy Gmail reading with mutt
  • Easy Backup and Recovery Ubuntu with Redobackup (GUI)
  • Make an RSS Feed from a Forum Thread

PC-BSD 8.1 review

Filed under
BSD

linuxbsdos.com: PC-BSD 8.1 was released on July 20, 2010, roughly five months after version 8.0 was released. Some of the suggestions made in the review of PC-BSD 8.0 have been carried out in this latest release.

How corporate America went open-source

Filed under
OSS

fortune.cnn.com: According to recent surveys, more large companies are committing to open-source software. How the platform went from closet to corporate.

Cheap Linux wall warts small on size, big on possibilities

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: Every geek and technology lover will undoubtedly have stumbled across online adverts for tiny headless Linux-powered devices that are barely larger than the power point they plug into. What can you actually do with them? Plenty, it seems!

Testdrive Let You Test Ubuntu With A Single Click

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: Test Drive is a package for Ubuntu that allows you to test drive the daily build of Ubuntu with little effort on the user side. With a single click, you can get the application to download the ISO from the web and run it in your virtual machine.

Java daddy says Sun engineers ran 'goofiest' patent contest

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: Sun engineers once ran an unofficial competition to see who could get the "goofiest" invention past the US patent office, according to former Sun man and Java founder James Gosling.

Linux defense group invests in mobile ID security

linuxfordevices.com: Linux patent defense organization Open Invention Network (OIN) announced a partnership with Arizona State University's Arizona Technology Enterprises (AzTE) office, focused on mobile device identity management research.

openSUSE 11.3

Filed under
SUSE

desktoplinuxreviews.com: SUSE Linux was one of my very first distros; I used to buy it from CompUSA and other places back when I first got started with Linux. These days, of course, one can simply use openSUSE instead of buying it at a store. This week I decided to look at openSUSE 11.3, the latest and greatest version.

OpenOffice Base – A Simple And Useful Database Management Tool

Filed under
OOo

maketecheasier.com: When most people think OpenOffice, they think of word processing or spreadsheets. What many people do not realize is that OpenOffice also includes Base, a database system roughly equivalent to MS Access.

Next Ubuntu, 11.04, named Natty Narwhal

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Allow me to introduce the Natty Narwhal, our mascot for development work that we expect to deliver as Ubuntu 11.04.

Oh Windows 7, you tease

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

celettu.wordpress: Anyone who has read this blog lately probably knows that I’m a bit dissatisfied with my Linux installs lately. I also follow a course in configuring Windows 7. I like it a lot. It’s beautiful, fast, and it works. Then, I bought Starcraft 2.

Rocking out with Minitunes

Filed under
Software

omgsuse.com: Since you've upgraded to KDE 4.5 and started to suddenly feel the need for speed, you aren't quite happy with Amarok 2 or Banshee anymore. "I want something faster, lighter" you think to yourself. Meet Minitunes.

A keener eye on Kino

Filed under
Software

openattitude.com: If you think that my glowing review of Kdenlive last week was perhaps a bit premature. And you’d be right. Instability is one thing, but when I found that I could not export my hour-long video to file or DVD without losing audio sync I had to move on — interestingly enough right back to Kino.

Seven Current Issues on the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux
Software

earthweb.com: Not long ago, the overwhelming issue on the Linux desktop was catching up with Windows and OS X. But some time in the last few years, that goal was reached. There are at least seven issues with which various versions of the free desktop are struggling.

GTK+2, GTK+3 Plays More With Cairo For Drawing

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: With GNOME 3.0 not being released now until March of 2011, GNOME 2.32 is being released next month and will continue to focus on dependable and trusted GNOME 2.x technologies, such as the GTK+2 library rather than GTK+3.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.