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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A Linux Desktop Designed for You Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 5:00am
Story Home automation hub runs Linux, offers cloud services Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 2:22am
Story Linux 3.17 Lands Memfd, A KDBUS Prerequisite Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:17am
Story LXQt 0.8 Is Being Released Soon Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:10am
Story About the use of linux for normal people Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:04am
Story Mesa 10.2.6 Has Plenty Of OpenGL Driver Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:53am
Story The Connected Car, Part 3: No Shortcuts to Security Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:38am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:41pm

Linux does not equal an unwashed foulmouthed rebel

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: If you use Linux then you are automatically a geek, an unwashed, pizza eating, cola and coffee swilling, obnoxious and scruffy rebel who just wants to stick it to the man.

OpenOffice.org New User Orientation

Filed under
OOo

blog.worldlabel: Welcome to OpenOffice.org, the world-class office suite that’s also free and open source. This is your new-user orientation.

Dailymotion tests non-Flash video portal

Filed under
Web

h-online.com: French video portal Dailymotion is ditching the use of proprietary plug-ins such as Flash and Silverlight for its "pré bêta" Dailymotion site. Instead, the open video site is exploring the possibilities offered by HTML 5 and the pre-release version of Firefox 3.5.

Free as Free Can Be--gNewSense Linux 2.2

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: Linux has, in some ways, always been a bit politicized in the sense that there are true believers among Linux users and developers that all software should be truly free. gNewSense Linux is geared toward those who want a truly free Linux distribution.

IBM Luring Unix Customers Onto Linux Mainframes

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: IBM, which is seeing a continued resurgence in the mainframe space, is offering new migration services and financial incentives in hopes of luring away some HP and Sun Unix customers

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 305

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Taking a look at Debris Linux

  • Tips and tricks: Running openSUSE "Factory"
  • News: OpenSolaris readies 2009.06, Fedora slips 11 again, FreeBSD 8.0 enters code freeze, NetBSD gets a new binary package manager, Debian gets improved support for Eee PC, openSUSE community develops a new Moblin distro, Ubuntu User magazine
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 7, CentOS 5.3 "Live CD"
  • Upcoming releases: OpenSolaris 2009.06
  • Donations: SliTaz GNU/Linux receives US$200
  • New additions: Debris Linux
  • New distributions: Foxy Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

OpenSolaris is becoming more like regular Solaris

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: Lines are beginning to blur between the open source and commercial versions of the Sun Microsystems Solaris Unix operating system.

Linux market share growing, growing, growing

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What is the true market share for Linux? A: Depends who you ask! You can find desktop penetration of 1%, 2% and 4% - and a server share right up to 46%!

Ubuntu Desktop: Plenty of sizzle, not much steak

Filed under
Ubuntu

networkworld.com: Ubuntu 9.0.4 Desktop, nicknamed Jaunty Jackalope, is likely to continue the Mac-like cult following for Canonical's Debian-based Linux distribution. But there's not a lot new here.

Linux Standards, And Why They Shouldn’t Matter

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The old debate about lack of standardization among different Linux platforms flared up on Slashdot this weekend. It’s a complicated topic, with complex arguments both for and against greater consolidation among Linux programming interfaces and distributions.

How GNU/Linux users can keep Mono at bay

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Developer Tim Chase, who describes himself as "a genetic geek", has created a package called Mononono which creates explicit conflicts with core Mono packages.

Is there only one choice for the Linux newcomer?

Filed under
MDV

openbytes.wordpress: Whilst Ubuntu is a great distro offering “out of the box” support, there is so much more to Linux and Linux != Ubuntu!

Say “Cheese” with your webcam on Linux

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: So you went ahead and purchased that System 76 laptop or you decided to finally install Linux on your laptop. You now have a Linux based laptop with a webcam. But how do you take advantage of this hardware?

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #144

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #144 for the week May 24th - May 31st, 2009 is available.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • How to control a computer remotely using Gnome vnc server

  • 11 Free Linux Remote Display Software
  • 915resolution with built-in uvesafb
  • 5 keys that work in Windows and Ubuntu 9.04
  • “Because humans need Oxygen.”
  • More on static analysis with gcc - meet dehydra
  • Kids in 26 schools get laptops
  • Open Government: the Latest Member of the Open Family

So What's the Real Problem in Desktop Linux?

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: It's a peculiar world of computing where some say Linux is ready to replace Windows on the Desktop. They consider Linux is better than Windows. So, what's holding the Tux back?

Blender 2.49 Released With Great Changes

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: A new release of Blender, the immensely popular open-source 3D modeling software, is now available. This is not the much-anticipated Blender 2.5 release, but instead version 2.49.

Ubuntu - Long Term Support - How long is it really?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: Ubuntu GNU/Linux Long Term Support which are the Ubuntu GNU/Linux versions that are supported for three years for desktop versions and five years for server versions.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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