Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Three things the Linux desktops needs to do to beat Windows

Filed under
Linux

sjvn: "What does Linux need to do to compete more successfully on the desktop?" We came up with several pain points, but some of them are clearly hurting Linux more than the others.

Amarok 2: a first look

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: With all the hoopla that has been surrounding KDE 4, I’d almost forget there’s another major piece of software working on a milestone release. Maybe not as major as KDE, but Amarok is arguably the best and most popular media player on the linux desktop. Amarok 2 is shaping up to be as radically different from Amarok 1.4 and that’s a very good thing indeed.

Linux Users on NBC's Olympics Videos: We Don't Get No Respect

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Where is Rodney Dangerfield when we need him? There are some heated messages flying around in the Ubuntu forums because NBC has announced that it will offer its online video coverage of the Beijing Olympics to Internet Explorer and Firefox users on the Mac and Windows, but not to Linux browser users.

Linspire is going away

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Linspire, the distribution originally launched as Lindows, is no more, says Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos.

Kernel Log: Btrfs 0.16 released, new stable kernels released, Wifi drivers for 2.6.27 merged

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The developers of Btrfs have released version 0.16 of the still experimental file system. new features include Access Control Lists, support for which is needed by SE Linux, and orphan inode protection to stop losing files after a crash. Alongside these new features are improvements in the scalability and performance of the new file system.

Linux patent pool to push for 'defensive publication'

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com (IDG): A tech vendor-backed company that buys up patents in an effort to protect the Linux community from intellectual property litigation will soon launch a Web site to help inventors file defensive publications -- documents that make details of an invention public, preventing others from later making patent claims on it.

Ubuntu after One Week

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.markwill.com: In my quest to run exclusively Ubuntu Linux (a free alternative to Microsoft Windows) at home for one month, I have completed the first week.

Memopal Recruits 100 Linux Beta Testers

Filed under
Linux

marketwatch.com (PR): Memopal http://www.memopal.com continuous, automatic, and long-term online backup. Memopal is looking for 100 beta testers around the world to form a Linux community that will help it develop the first low-cost online backup system for Linux.

How I Helped Build Refurbished Linux PCs at LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Building and using Linux-based PCs is a rewarding and fullfilling pastime for open source enthusiasts, but spreading the gospel to the masses can be even more satisfying.

3 Linux Apps That Make Me Hate Windows

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: I'm a Windows user, and it's served me well. That being said, I play with a lot of Linux distributions and there are some applications that are just so much better than anything Windows can offer that I find myself wondering how long it'll be until I make the switch.

How trustworthy are Linux binaries?

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: How truly trustworthy are binary files on Linux? I only ask this question because of a recent article on Slashdot that brought up an interesting point about binaries distributed on Linux. Not directly of course, but the implications are there.

12 Great Quotes from “The Cathedral and the Bazaar”

Filed under
OSS

junauza.com: The Cathedral and the Bazaar, a famous essay by Eric S. Raymond, has been a great inspiration by many open source software developers. I’m going to share to you a few highly inspiring quotes that I took from The Cathedral and the Bazaar:

Licensing Gives Linux the Edge over Windows in the Virtualization Battle

Filed under
Linux

oreillynet.com/onlamp/blog: There’s been a lot of interesting product wars over the years: WordPerfect vs. Word, 1-2-3 vs. Excel... One of the current product battles taking shape is in server virtualization. And, like many past product confrontations, Microsoft’s Hyper-V is the late-to-the-game underdog.

Linux games - First Person Shooters

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: One of the major reasons why most of people still use Windows is the gaming community. It begins with constant hardware upgrades, required to stay apace in the losing game of ever-rising minimum requirements for this or that game. But this does not have to be so.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • KDE 4.1 packages under Mandriva 2008.1 Spring

  • ssh-xfer: Quickly grabbing files over an existing SSH connection
  • How to install and setup Netbook Remix on the Eee PC
  • Tweak Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) for VMware Server
  • Getting the current weather on your Ubuntu desktop
  • Connecting Ubuntu Linux to a networked printer

Thinkfree Office Suite On Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

ma65p.wordpress: I tried out Thinkfree about a year ago and just recently check back and it was a pleasant surprise. The website looks much more professional and the user interface for the online version is total awesome. Best off all, Thinkfree offers an offline version that sync seemlessly with the online storage. I love it.

Installfest: Untangle, Ubuntu Linux Save 750 PCs From Landfills

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The final numbers are in. During Installfest at this week’s LinuxWorld Expo, Untangle and its partners put Ubuntu Linux on 750 aging PCs that now run like new.

Forgotten PC history: The true origins of the personal computer

computerworld.com: This year marks an almost forgotten 40th anniversary: the conception of the device that ultimately became the PC. And no, it did not happen in California.

Linux Kernel news: Wlan and Webcams for everyone

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: At the Ottawa Linux symposium the current state of Wlan in Linux was highlighted in detail. In the meantime, the development version of the Linux kernel included the gspca webcam drivers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The Open Source Licensing Implosion

  • Open source census says, free as in beer
  • QNX opens up the source code for its filesystems
  • IBM Exec on Linux Apps: 'I'm Tired of Waiting'
  • Exporting logs from Suunto X6HR watches on Linux
  • Microsoft creates open-source lab in RP
  • Canonical Preparing Virtual Ubuntu Server Appliances
  • An unplanned quick look at LinuxWorld 2008
  • Drizzle makes MySQL lean, mean again
  • Why Europe loves open source
  • 2.6.27-rc2, "A Lot Of Random Changes"
  • Some Pictures Worth a Thousand Words - Caldera OpenLinux Lite
  • Ubuntu attracts the lion's share of LinuxWorld's smaller crowds
  • My Bootchart Record: 12 Seconds to Boot, 7 Seconds to X
  • Tiny open source computer made from six ICs
  • Portrait: Michelle Murrain lives the open source lifestyle
  • Outsider No More: Linux Critical In Many Data Centers
  • At last -- native apps for Motorola Linux phones
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more