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About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Top Features Of The Linux 3.17 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 9:58pm
Story The Power of Linux (Almost) Everywhere Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 9:19pm
Story OpenELEC 4.2.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 6:47pm
Story Scientific Linux 7.0 RC1 Has Finally Arrived Rianne Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 6:03pm
Story Bitnami: Making it easy and efficient to test server apps on your desktop and in the cloud Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 2:39pm
Story Icarus Excel Features 9.7 inch Screen and Android 4.0 Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 2:38pm
Story Valve Super Sale, Office Reunification, and elementary Reviews Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 7:58am
Story If you thought it couldn’t get better, here is OpenMandriva Lx 2014.1 Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 7:57am
Blog entry Tux Machines is under attack Rianne Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 7:46am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 27/09/2014 - 12:41am

Ubuntu 9.04 – A very buggy affair

Filed under
Ubuntu

adifire.wordpress: Just a few months ago, I decided that I would install a linux operating system in my notebook, though being a Windows fan. So I decided that I can directly jump to the latest version of Ubuntu, Jaunty Jackalope, version 9.04.

What does the future hold for MySQL?

Filed under
Software
Interviews

ddj.com: Michael "Monty" Widenius was the creator of the MySQL database, and founder of Monty Program Ab. He recently spoke with Dr. Dobb's Jonathan Erickson.

Decibel Audio Player 1.0 - Simplistic Music Player for GNOME

Filed under
Reviews

In the past I reviewed Minirok, which is a minimalist music player for KDE with a simple interface. Well, Decibel surely is its counterpart in GNOME. The version I'm going to talk about is 1.00 running in Ubuntu 9.04 with GNOME 2.26.

Gnome-Art NextGen - Icons, Themes, Wallpapers, Splash Screens and Grub One Click Install

Filed under
Linux

Gnome-Art Next Generation is the successor of Gnome-Art and lets you change your Gnome-themes (icon-, wallpaper-, splash-,...-themes) with one click. It is in an early stage and under development but it looks very promising already.

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 5 Awesome Mozilla Labs Projects for Firefox 3.5

  • 10 Concerns We Have About Google Chrome OS
  • Banshee and F-Spot to depend on Moonlight
  • Red Hat added to S&P 500
  • The good and the bad of netbooks
  • EasyIngres Seeks To Attract MySQL Developers
  • Microsoft Patent Aggression Continues against Free Software
  • Opera 10 Beta 2: A Solution For Older Computers
  • openSuse Network Manager vs Wicd
  • Migrating to Linux, Part 1: Sharing a Room With Windows
  • Promises Plated in Chrome
  • Ultimate Mobile OS Showdown:
  • Linux Camping: Day 2 - Starting a fire and burning things
  • The Intellectual Property Rights Imperative of Single-Vendor Open Source

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto install Line6-GuitarPort in ubuntu

  • Tech Tip: Using Ghostscript to Convert and Combine Files
  • HOWTO : Sockso 1.1.8 (Music Server) on Ubuntu 9.04 Server
  • Removing the dreaded 'Read More' Link in Drupal
  • How to uninstall Linux
  • Simulate Eddington’s Experiment in Kstars
  • Using git behind a proxy
  • Kerberos fun Pt 2
  • Monitoring Linux and Windows hosts with SNMP and Cacti
  • Anonymous SSH sessions with TOR
  • Howto Optimize Firefox and Benchmarking

Checking out the Jolicloud Netbook OS

linuxloop.com: The fact that the current most popular OS for Netbooks is a stock install of Windows XP tells us that there is a need for a netbook OS that doesn’t suck. Jolicloud promises to be that netbook OS that really works.

The People Behind Penumbra

Filed under
Interviews
Gaming

linuxlock.blogspot: I want to personally thank those who brought the Frictional Game Servers to the brink of molten metal. As promised, I want to introduce you to the people that brought the frightful Penumbra Trilogy to you.

Dear Firefox, You Have Non-Windows Users Too

Filed under
Moz/FF

linuxtoday.com: A medium-large bit of news this week is a potentially serious exploit in the shiny new freshly-released Firefox 3.5, which was released, discovered, and fixed nearly all at the same time. Another open source security success story! Except for one thing-- no one bothered to report if this dastardly flaw affects Linux.

Announcing Apperi - The Linux App Store

Filed under
Linux

apperi.com: We are proud to announce the launch of the public beta of apperi.com. A new linux app store for Debian and Ubuntu users. Apperi.com currently supports users of Debian 4 & 5 as well as Ubuntu 8.04, 8.10, and 9.04 with a total of 119,295 packages.

Xubuntu: The Better Ubuntu than Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

osnews.com: While we regularly discuss Ubuntu, and to a lesser degree Kubuntu, there's also a version of Ubuntu tailor-made for the Xfce desktop environment. As most of you are aware, it's called Xubuntu.

Pardus 2009 Looks Fantastic

Filed under
Linux

easylinuxcds.com: I had read in the Pardus release announcement that the Pardus had been “improved graphically in every part of the distribution”. It takes about 3 seconds to realize this.

Walter Cronkite dies at 92

Filed under
Obits

variety.com: Walter Cronkite, the TV newsman who became known as "the most trusted man in America" during his 19 years as anchor of the "CBS Evening News," died today of cancer. He was 92.

Every License has its Time and Place

Filed under
OSS

dirkriehle.com: The classic choice for the community license has been the GPL. The GPL supports building a community of users and customers while stalling competitors through its reciprocal nature.

A Linux security story

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: There's no such thing as perfect security. There are no programs that give you absolute software security. After all, security is a process, not a product. Linux's security process, though, is outstanding, which is one reason why it has great security. Here's an example.

Reports on the Death of the GPL …

Filed under
OSS

blogs.opennms.org: It’s funny, from my small corner of the world it seems like the GPL is under attack of late.

linux malware, sure it’s possible

Filed under
Linux

bambambambam.wordpress: I did a bit of research into it and discovered that a few people have already documented this possible vulnerability, and that it is somewhat legitimate.

Xfe - Fast & Lightweight File Manager for the X Window System

Filed under
Reviews

Xfe (X File Explorer) is a wonderful, fast and lightweight file manager for Linux built using the FOX toolkit with a customisable interface which can resemble the twin-panel style of Midnight Commander if needed.

Quod Libet - A Different GTK Music Player

Filed under
Reviews

Quod Libet is a GTK music player written in Python with support for various audio formats, including Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, MP3, WAV, MP4 and WMA. Quod Libet has a different interface and a slightly different approach compared to players like Rhythmbox or Banshee, for example.

Linux Kernel Virtual Machine improves build performance

Filed under
Linux

Create a build service using the Linux Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) for better performance

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases