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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tiny rugged Linux COM jumps on TI Sitara AM57x Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:42am
Story Ubuntu MATE’s Martin Wimpress Talks Raspberry Pi & FOSS Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:36am
Story Liquid Lemur Linux Floats Fluid Desktop Design Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:35am
Story OpenStack and Servers Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:26am
Story Antergos Linux Rolling Distro Now Features the GNOME 3.18 Desktop Environment Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:10am
Story Intel minions create fast open source graphics Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 9:06am
Story Leftovers: BSD Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2015 - 8:24am
Story CentOS Turns 12, Happy Birthday! Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Canonical Releases Important Security Patches for Ubuntu 15.04 and 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2015 - 11:21pm
Story Tiny Snapdragon 600 module includes WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2015 - 11:10pm

Cuba sets to migrate to free, open-source software

Filed under
Linux
OSS

xinhuanet.com: Cuba has set a strategic goal in 2011 to migrate most of its computers to open-source software, a move designed to strengthen the country's technological security and sovereignty.

10 Instant Messaging Clients for Linux

Filed under
Reviews

aMSN is a powerful, highly configurable and feature-rich client for the WLM (formerly known as MSN) protocol with support for skins, plugins, system tray integration, webcam, tabbed chat windows, multi-accounts, offline messaging, chat history, display picture and many, many more. The configuration options are abundant via the Account->Preferences menu.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is Linux dead on the desktop?
  • World of Padman 1.5
  • Schools Prefer Not To Scrap Working PCs
  • Can an old PC be saved by Linux? Yes, but
  • Coding styles comparison in the Open Source Software world
  • Ettercap Troubles on SourceForge
  • Red Hat goes after Windows server market share
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.5.9: urgent update for single-sourceslist users
  • Linux Mint News Update
  • Microsoft: Novell is toast and the patent Juggernaut rolls on

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Desktop, Create Custom New Tab Page In Firefox
  • How to build your own router
  • gpg: decryption failed: No secret key
  • Appnr - Web-based ubuntu package browser
  • Switch Between Tab Groups in Firefox with a Keyboard Shortcut
  • Create & Use A USB Ubuntu Linux Boot Jump Drive
  • The best way to dual boot Linux and Windows
  • A Guide to Wine on Ubuntu for Beginners
  • Manual disk partitioning guide for Linux Mint Debian Edition
  • Securing Apache—Part 4
  • Systemclean- A nautilus script to clean your system from unnecessary files
  • Tips and Tricks for the Python Interpreter
  • Integrate Thunderbird In The Ubuntu Messaging Menu [PPA]
  • How to add gbr files to gimp in windows...
  • Replace Default Scrollbar Buttons For Mint-X-Metal Theme

PCLOS 64-Bit Suffers Delays, but Still Coming

Filed under
PCLOS

ostatic.com: A long anticipated 64-bit version of PCLOS was reported to be in development this past November. And as 2010 draws to a close, some wonder what is its current status.

Swiched to Fedora

Filed under
KDE
Linux

omat.nl: Yesterday I was so annoyed by my computer that I burned a cd with Fedora and installed it. I also had a 1,5TB disk waiting to be inserted, combining that made the switch pretty easy.

Linux for the rest of us?

Filed under
Ubuntu

firstarkansasnews.net: Back in the late 1990s, people were touting Linux as the “next big thing.” Think back to 1998 when an internal memo released by Microsoft about the “Linux threat” was leaked to the public. It appeared that Linux might be on the verge of seriously challenging Microsoft’s dominance in the marketplace.

More details emerge on ‘mystery’ Ubuntu tablet

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: More information has surfaced on the new Ubuntu-powered tablet device we wrote about last week.

Finally a Download Accelerator for Linux that Works with Chromium

Filed under
Software

ubuntuvibes.com: There are not many download accelerators for Linux that integrate well with web browsers and have support for downloading links right from the browser. Command line tools like Axel download accelerator and Aria2 are available for Linux but then you have to download links by copy/pasting them into terminal or in a GUI for it.

Red Hat reasserts itself in Thailand

Filed under
Linux

bangkokpost.com: Seeing the growth potential of cloud computing in the Asia-Pacific region, Red Hat is promoting its open source software to universities and reasserting its presence in Thailand for the first time in three years.

Opera 11 Takes On IE, Safari, Chrome

Filed under
Software

eweek.com: Opera 11 shipped Dec. 16 with new extensions, tab stacking and visual navigation aids that put the web browser on a competitive footing with Microsoft's IE. The features add productivity and conveninece to the Opera experience and could be compelling advantage.

Will Intel's Sandy Bridge & P67 Play Well With Linux?

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Next week Intel is set to roll out their much-anticipated "Sandy Bridge" CPUs during the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show. With these 32nm, LGA-1155 next-generation Intel Core processors will also come the Intel P67 Chipset on a whole selection of new motherboards at launch like the ECS P67H2-A2 and ASRock P67 Pro3. How well though will Intel's newest hardware play with Linux?

Open Source Languages in 2010: Developer Year in Review

Filed under
Software

developer.com: 2010 was a busy year for open source programming languages, with major new releases and upheavals that will shape the development landscape for years to come.

Clementine Review: Resurrecting The Wolf

Filed under
Software

muktware.com: “Thriving on the success of the popular Amarok 1.4, Clementine tries to provide a reminiscent user experience and on par acoustics to the Amarok 1.4.x user base”.

I Figured Out What to Explain to You Next: Bylaws

Filed under
SUSE
Legal
  • So. What Now?
  • Dear PJ: Please Don't Quit Groklaw
  • I Figured Out What to Explain to You Next: Bylaws -- And a Word to the OpenSUSE Guys

Mozilla inadvertently publishes thousands of user IDs

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Firefox developer Mozilla has revealed this week that a database containing usernames and password hashes belonging to thousands of users of addons.mozilla.org had been posted publicly by accident.

9 Free and Open Source Software Stories to Watch in 2011

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: This year, I'm giving up making predictions. Instead, here are the stories that are likely to make headlines in 2011 for free and open source software.

AriOS: Light Interface Lotsa Apps Ubuntu Remaster

Filed under
Ubuntu

webupd8.org: AriOS is the successor of mFatOS, an Ubuntu remaster we talked about a while back. AriOS 2.0 was released today and it's based on Ubuntu 10.10 - the new version tries to replicate Unity but as opposed to Unity, it's customizable thanks to AWM.

7 Predictions For Open Source in 2011

Filed under
OSS

pcworld.com: Predictions for the upcoming year are always plentiful in December, and this year is no exception. On PCWorld, for example, we've seen security predictions, enterprise resoure software (ERP) predictions, and general IT forecasts for 2011. What I haven't seen so far, however, are predictions for Linux and other open-source software.

LinuxUser's kernel column #95 by Jon Masters

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: Jon Masters talks about features in the 2.6.37 Linux kernel and describes debugging a kernel problem using the Git bisection feature…

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More in Tux Machines

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.

Exploring Contributors Centrality Over Time

At the end of my previous post we concluded with yet another question. Indeed, on the 2017 KDEPIM contributor network we found out that Christian Mollekopf while being a very consistent committer didn't appear as centrality as we would expect. Yet from the topology he seemed to act as a bridge between the core contributors and contributors with a very low centrality. This time we'll try to look into this and figure out what might be going on. My first attempt at this was to try to look into the contributor network on a different time period and see how it goes. If we take two snapshots of the network for the two semesters of 2017, how would it look? Well, easy to do with my current scripts so let's see! Read more

KDE: Elisa 0.1.1, KDE Plasma 5.13 and More

  • 0.1.1 Release of Elisa
    The Elisa team is happy to announce the first bug fix release for the 0.1 version.
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Making Great Improvements On Its Wayland Support
    KDE Plasma 5.13 that is due for release in June will have a great number of improvements to its Wayland support for allowing the KDE Plasma desktop to work much better on this alternative to the X.Org Server. KDE developer Roman Gilg has provided a nice summary of some of the Wayland improvements in the queue for the Plasma 5.13.0 release due out towards the middle of June.
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    I’ve initiated a big project: overhauling KDE Open & Save dialogs for greater usability and productivity.
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    Latte Dock v0.7.5   has been released containing important fixes and improvements! Hopefullly this is going to be the last stable version for v0.7.x family. During the next months the next stable branch (v0.8.x) is going to appear.