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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 10 predictions for open source in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 03/01/2014 - 3:03pm
Story Top open source developments Roy Schestowitz 03/01/2014 - 3:01pm
Story The rise of Drupal and the fall of closed source Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2014 - 8:52am
Story Fedora 20 Delivers Updated Gnome Software Center Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2014 - 2:33am
Story Open-Source Blu-ray Decryption Library For Linux Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2014 - 2:24am
Story Seven Embedded Linux Segments to Watch in 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 02/01/2014 - 10:42pm
Story Btrfs-Progs To Be Updated In Tandem With The Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 02/01/2014 - 10:35pm
Story Samsung's Galaxy Camera 2 starts to refine the Android point-and-shoot Rianne Schestowitz 02/01/2014 - 10:24pm
Story Ubuntu In 2014 Roy Schestowitz 02/01/2014 - 10:24pm
Story Development Release: FreeBSD 10.0-RC4 Rianne Schestowitz 02/01/2014 - 10:15pm

FOSS: time to stop the navel-gazing

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: Discussions about free and open source software can arouse strong emotions. That's something I've known for many years but one often tends to forget these things in the rush of daily life.

GOS 3 on a EEE pc 901

Filed under
Linux

linuxexperimentation.blogspot: I am environment friendly, I am a botanist and probably that's the reason why I love Green. I am a fan of the environmental friendly Asus EEE pc which consumes less power and seemingly helps reduce global warming. It would be a good combination for GOS and EEE to work together in delivering a great computing experience. So I set out to test my hypotheis by installing GOS on my new EEE 901.

How To Stop Firefox Clickjacking Exploit Attack

Filed under
Security

cyberciti.biz: Really scary exploit attack in wild, which affects all browsers under any desktop operating systems including MS IE, Linux, Apple safari, Opera, Firefox and Adobe flash. Any website that uses CSS, flash and IFRAME can be used to attack on end users. Attacker is able to take control of the links that your browser visits.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • 125+ Linux wallpapers

  • Linux triumphs in UK schools as hell freezes over
  • Will GNOME 2.2.4 improve the Linux desktop?
  • Upgrade Your Linux Desktop Experience With GNOME 2.24
  • Mandriva Mini: Linux For Atom -- And For OEMs Only (So Far)
  • More On The Mandriva Mini
  • Open source: The new usability testing
  • Linux criticisms probably won't win Solaris converts
  • 2.6.27 Kernel Killing Network Hardware
  • openSUSE Membership Applications…
  • 3 Ways to Visualize Your Search History With FireFox
  • How To Avoid Becoming a Defendant in a GPL-Related Lawsuit
  • GNOME 3.0 Art / User-Interface Roadmap
  • S01E15 - Five Sleepy Heads - Ubuntu UK Podcast
  • Sidux 2008-03
  • Microsoft: Windows and Linux offer same TCO in emerging markets
  • Verify that a daily cron function is running in gentoo

  • How to run the jack audio connection seamlessly in gnome on Fedora
  • Never Installed a Firewall on Ubuntu? Try Firestarter
  • TuxGuitar - A multitrack guitar tablature editor and player
  • Process monitoring with ps-watcher
  • A Poor Man’s Multi-Monitor Setup On A Single Physical Head

Installing Linux apps: A few good tips

Filed under
HowTos

computerworld.com: Sooner or later, we all end up installing new software on our computers. Whether it's a new version of Firefox, or a cool game, or a video editing package, there comes a time when you want to make your system do more than it can do now.

Define “Contributions”

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: In his opening keynote at the Linux Plumbers Conference in Portland, Greg Kroah-Hartman did so succinctly, if bluntly. His metric? Kernel contributions. Simple. Underneath all the rhetoric and the broadsides lies a real question: is Canonical a member in good standing of the Linux ecosystem?

power management goodness: kde 4.2 will suck less

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: As Dario has already blogged, we have a great new application in kdebase, scheduled to be released with KDE 4.2 in january. PowerDevil is actually not an application in the traditional sense. PowerDevil delivers the infrastructure for power management in KDE.

KDE 4.1.2 tagged, gentoo land frozen

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo

freehackers.org: On July 29th, KDE 4.1, the first almost usable KDE version since the 3.5 branch, has been released, and since then guess what happened in the gentoo-kde land? Nothing. Rumors are that developers have fought each others and the kde team is just no more.

The five best desktop Linuxes you haven't tried

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: One of the pleasures of Linux is that you can try out different distributions to see which one works best for you. You like Ubuntu, but you want to fine tune the desktop engine? OK, try Kubuntu with its KDE desktop then. Some worthwhile distributions, however, don't get as much attention as they deserve. So, here's my list of five great distributions that you might want to try.

Open source could fix e-voting flaws, California secretary of state says

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: California Secretary of State Debra Bowen argued Thursday that open source software can help fix some of the flaws in electronic voting systems, which have proliferated throughout the country since the 2000 election yet been criticized as unreliable.

Ubuntu 8.10 beta freeze now in effect

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: We are now one week from the beta release of 8.10 and have just entered beta freeze.

Q & A with John Lilly, CEO of Mozilla Corp.

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

mercurynews.com: John Lilly became chief executive of Mozilla Corp. in January, moving up from his role as chief operating officer. He's been with the company that created the open-source Firefox browser since 2005, the year Firefox 1.5 was released.

Fedora @5: How a Community Approach Works

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Seeing the Fedora Project pass its five year milestone got me thinking about the early days of the community-based Linux distribution and how far it's come.

Gentoo 2008.1 Release Solutions

Filed under
Gentoo

Daniel Robbins: Gentoo seems to be having problems with .”1” releases – 2007.1 was cancelled and now 2008.1 has been cancelled. The Gentoo project has also announced a desire to move to a more “back to basics approach” where they are doing weekly builds of Gentoo stages. Good idea.

On-line applications "just work"; why worry about the freedom of the licence?

freesoftwaremagazine.com: An increasing number of computer users are turning to online applications instead of ones on their desktop. It started with webmail and has moved to productivity/office tools. With the emergence of online applications that have no desktop equivalent, and mobile devices that are browsers in your pocket, things are looking up. But what about free software?

Dabbling in OpenSolaris

Filed under
OS

geekzone.co.nz: Recently, I have had the chance to dabble a bit in OpenSolaris while working on a particular server installation. OpenSolaris, as you may know, is the recently open-sourced version of Sun's Solaris OS, which in turn is one of the many flavours of Unix.

Trying Linux on your Windows system

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: A Windows user who wants to evaluate Linux, or any other alternative operating system, on their current system has a large number of options. In this article, we will look at those options for the busy Windows user who is evaluating Linux, wants to use open source applications, but doesn't want to lose access to their Windows system.

Do-it-yourself Konqueror commands

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: KDE's Konqueror is as multifunctional as a Swiss Army knife. It works as both a file manager and a Web browser, and you can enhance it even further by adding new commands to its repertoire by means of service menus.

KOffice 2.0 Beta1 Released

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The KOffice team is proud to announce the first beta of KOffice 2.0. The goal of this release is to gather feedback from both users and developers on the new UI and underlying infrastructure. This will allow us to release a usable 2.0 release.

Ten easy ways to attract women to your free software project

Filed under
Linux

The gender inequality among developers and supporters of free software is stunning. Less than 2% of us are women, according to studies conducted for the European Commission. Why? The evidence says we’re driving them away. There are even some pretty good published guidelines on how not to drive them away. What’s missing is a practical implementation strategy: here I present ten relatively simple changes in how you run your project, to make it more attractive to would-be contributors—especially women.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.