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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wayland's Libinput Gets New Multi-Touch Touchpad Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 7:38am
Story DistroWatch, Without Windows, and Others Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 7:31am
Story What future holds for KDE’s Nepomuk? Rianne Schestowitz 18/02/2014 - 7:24am
Story BeagleBone Black: The Sub-$50 ARM Linux Board Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 11:00pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.14 RC3 Released with Updated Drivers and Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:46pm
Story Android-x86 4.4 review – first Release Candidate Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 6:56pm
Story Open source alternatives for small businesses Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 5:01pm
Story Open source startups: Don't try to be Red Hat Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:59pm
Story IBM Power Development Platform Emphasizes Linux ISVs Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:54pm
Story Chrome OS and Android may be top desktop Linux distros in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:50pm

11 Prime Features of openSUSE 11.1 - A Comprehensive Review

Filed under
SUSE

blog.taragana: Open Suse is coming out with their new version of 11.1 and we are at it. openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 is just released, while the official launch of the final version is on 18 December, 2008. We took a detailed look into openSUSE 11.1 beta 4 and here are the gems we found.

Early Look at Firefox's Private Browsing Mode

Filed under
Moz/FF

lifehacker.com: Firefox users have long had the capability to surf the web without leaving any cookies, URL history, or other identifying marks, given add-ons like Stealther and many others. In the next upgrade to the open-source browser, 3.1, the browser itself will offer a "Private Browsing" mode for anything you don't want shown to anyone else on your system—you know, like gift ideas!

Enabling Compiz Fusion On An Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop (NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I am using an NVIDIA GeForce FX 5200 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop.

9 Reasons why I found Ubuntu 8.10 disappointing

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.friendster.com: I installed Ubuntu 8.10 64-bit edition. And now I regret it. here’s something seriously wrong with my wireless driver. PulseAudio is more broken than before!

openSUSE 11.1's New Partitioning Module

Filed under
SUSE

ostatic.com: openSUSE 11.1 is moving ever closer to its December release date. One of the changes long time openSUSE users will notice right away is the new YaST disk partitioner.

ASRock G43Twins-FullHD

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: One of the motherboards to use Intel's G43 is the ASRock G43Twins-FullHD, which we happen to be looking at today. This motherboard that pairs the Intel G43 with an ICH10 Southbridge supports both DDR2 and DDR3 system memory and its video connectors include D-Sub, DVI-D, and DisplayPort.

Dillo 2.0 is fast, but limited

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The lightweight Dillo Web browser, in development for eight years, has always been a contender for the fastest browser available on GNU/Linux -- so much so that the Google's Chrome will have to be pretty nimble to outpace it. With last month's release of version 2.0, Dillo is faster than ever.

Review: CentOS 5.2

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: This month’s Linux Format Magazine came with CentOS 5.2 on the disc. CentOS, in case you don’t know, is a community supported version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. (RHEL) Again, in the unlikely case you don’t know - Red Hat is required to supply the source code to all GPL code it uses in RHEL. What they don’t have to do is supply the Source RPMs which make it extremely easy for a distro like CentOS to exist.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian discord over de-classified developer proposal

  • trunk/kdelibs/plasma/
  • Xandros Announces Broad Series of Cross-Platform Management Packs (PR)
  • Don't Fear Big-Box Linux Development
  • Mozilla Developer News Nov 04
  • Fedora 10 Linux previewed
  • Qt Creator, KDevelop
  • OpenSolaris Constitution: Updating v2
  • Ubuntu and Your Money
  • And people actually pay for this stuff?
  • Goodbye My Friend
  • Fl_TeacherTool: Award-winning software with an uncertain future
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Not End of Capitalism
  • If Windows is a dead end, what's next?
  • What Linux Needs To Win on Desktops

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Keep Track of Your Time with Hamster Applet

  • Super Grub Disk To The Rescue
  • List Open Files
  • Using dnsmasq for DNS and DHCP services
  • Recover Deleted Files From Your Linux System
  • Folding@Home on Ubuntu
  • conquer your file associations in kde
  • Recover grub bootloader with Vista, Xp and Linux
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux

Diebold faces GPL infringement lawsuit over voting machines

Filed under
OSS
Legal

arstechnica.com: Artifex Software, the company behind the open source Ghostscript PDF processing software, has filed a lawsuit against voting machine vendor Diebold and its subsidiary Premier Election Solutions. Artifex says that Diebold violated the GPL by incorporating Ghostscript into commercial electronic voting machine systems.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 beta boosts virtualization capabilities

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat Inc.has introduced the beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.3, which includes improvements in virtualization, clustering and file systems, along with support for the latest hardware drivers.

Funtoo: Metro 1.1 Released

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: I’ve just released version 1.1 of Metro and updated the QuickStart Guide to reflect this new version.

TV-B-Gone: Not Your Average Open Source Success Story

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: There is an interesting story regarding open source hardware making the rounds today. Have you ever heard of TV-B-Gone?

Beta 3 of Amarok 2.0 released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: The Amarok team announces the third beta release of Amarok 2.0, codename Ataksak. It includes a database importer for users of Amarok 1.4, who want to keep their statistics and ratings, as well as a lot of bugfixes and improvements.

Mandriva appoints Hervé Yahi as Chairman – Chief Executive Officer

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com (PR): Mandriva, the leading European Linux publisher, today announced the appointment of Hervé Yahi as Chairman – CEO.

Linux Desktop Education Deployments Planned in 29 US States

Filed under
Linux

linuxpr.com (PR): Omni and Userful today announced that over 50 academic institutions from 29 US States and 10 countries worldwide have signed up to deploy Multi-station SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktops through the "Free the Penguins" education initiative.

GNUveau Networks builds solar-powered Linux computer networks

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Scott Johnson of GNUveau Networks has developed a solar-powered Internet "hub" system (running Ubuntu GNU/Linux) that he builds to order in his Daytona Beach, Florida, home. His objective is to bring computers and the Internet to places that have no connectivity, no phone service, and no electricity.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 277

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: An overview of Ubuntu editions

  • News: Fedora unveils Plymouth, Sugar spin, Sabayon hints at major new features, Yellow Dog launches beta testing, NetBSD prepares to branch 5.0, CrossOver Linux
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10 Preview, Ubuntu 9.04 release schedule
  • Donations: GoblinX receives US$250
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Gentoo: USE=kerberos removed from the default profiles

  • Linux Void: Episode 11 - Hawking Pumpkins
  • (Poll) Which OS do you prefer?
  • How to install latest Amarok and digikam in Fedora 9
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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

nginx

Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more