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Wednesday, 28 Jan 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story RSSOwl 2.0.1 Review - Feature-Rich Feed Reader for Linux Chris7mas 27/12/2009 - 10:07am
Story Sansa Fuze, Works great with Ubuntu and Rythmbox srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 10:32pm
Story Decent Office Suite in Linux srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 10:30pm
Story Open source became big business in 2009 srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 8:27pm
Story An early look at VLMC srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 8:26pm
Story Proposal for a new Linux distribution srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 8:24pm
Story "I love" Google search results… OS X trails Linux srlinuxx 1 26/12/2009 - 8:14pm
Story Where is Samba going? gfranken 26/12/2009 - 7:51pm
Story Full Review: Nexuiz 2.5.2 - Free First-Person Shooter for Linux Chris7mas 26/12/2009 - 4:00pm
Story Ubuntu's backward step srlinuxx 26/12/2009 - 1:38pm

Create training videos with pyvnc2swf

Filed under
HowTos

How many times has someone verbally explained how to do something on a computer to you? How many times do you end up asking them to just show you? For these situations there is pyvnc2swf, a program that turns screen input into video files. Let's see just how easy it is to use it to producing training videos.

OpenOffice bundles Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

Future versions of OpenOffice.org will come bundled with Mozilla's Thunderbird email client and Lightning calendar application.

How to change your login screen in Ubuntu/Gnome

Filed under
HowTos

I don’t know why but the phrase eye-candy always makes me think of accidentally getting pixie stick contents blown into my eye. Ouch! Anyway, here’s another eye-candy (wipes tears away) trick for your box. Say you want to change your login screen. You’re tired of the brown look, or the defaults just aren’t cutting it for you. Well there’s a simple way to do this.

Is Linux vs. Windows a Religious Decision?

Filed under
Linux

Dick Federle is a highly experienced IT systems manager and architect, having designed and supervised many custom development jobs. Along the way, Federle has noticed an odd phenomenon in the world of IT. He’s seen many managers make one of their most critical decisions – whether to opt for Windows or for Linux – on strictly personal grounds.

Kubuntu not quite right for a Tablet PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux is known for running well (or at least running) on older hardware and exotic platforms. I attempted to install Kubuntu Dapper Drake (6.10) on a Compaq TC1000 Tablet PC. I discovered that while Linux may install on nearly every platform, and run faster than its proprietary competition, it may not always be the best-fitting choice for every environment.

Use the source, Luke?

Filed under
Gentoo

I love Gentoo, I also hate it with a vengeance. I’m not talking small time peeves here, like the way Krispy Kremes icing gets all over your fingers (and by extension, clothes). I’m talking the type of frustration that is expressed in multitudes of expletives, some of which would make the profinsaurus cry.

Virtually Speaking: Simplifying the Infrastructure

Filed under
Software

There are many well-documented advantages to virtualization. Now that the technology is deployed throughout the data center, the disadvantages are starting to surface. One such disadvantage is rising complexity.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

Filed under
Reviews

SELinux (Security Enhanced Linux) has been talked about for quite a while and been written about for almost as long. What is surprising is that there has never really been a book written that functions as a hands-on guide for its implementation in the real world. This despite the fact that it is supported in Red Hat, Debian, Gentoo, and others. SELinux by Example fills that void and does so admirably.

Nano editor tutorials

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HowTos

nano is a small, free and friendly editor which aims to replace Pico,the default editor included in the non-free Pine package. Rather than just copying Pico’s look and feel, nano also implements some missing (or disabled by default) features in Pico, such as “search and replace” and “go to line number”.

Integration of dbus and KDE: starting and stopping the session part of dbus with KDM

Filed under
HowTos

Since some time now a lot of applications make use of D-BUS. This is the case with KDE 3.5, the current stable release of KDE. With the upcomming KDE 4, D-BUS is getting more important, replacing DCOP. In this howto I want to describe a way to start and stop the user and session dependent part of dbus.

Python slithers to 'significant' release

Filed under
Software

The open source community this week hailed the most significant update to Python in five years. Python 2.5 contains major improvements in reliability, performance and efficiency, according to release manager Anthony Baxter.

Recall proposal puts Debian leader in dunc-tank

Filed under
Linux

Debian Project Leader (DPL) Anthony Towns may face a recall vote over his involvement with Dunc-Tank, a non-official group that proposes to collect donations to pay Debian release managers to ensure that Debian etch is in early December as scheduled.

Boot Linux faster

Filed under
HowTos

This article shows you how to improve the boot speed of your Linux system without compromising usability. Essentially, the technique involves understanding system services and their dependencies, and having them start up in parallel, rather than sequentially, when possible.

GNOME plans October Boston summit

Filed under
Software

The GNOME development will host its sixth Boston Summit Oct. 7-9 at the MIT Media Lab. The Boston Summit is a three-day "hackfest" for GNOME developers and contributors, the team said on its website.

Interview: Elizabeth Krumbach of LinuxChix

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

As women become more involved with open source communities, it's important that their voices be heard. The dot is beginning a new series of interviews with women who contribute to F/OSS. Our first interviewee is Elizabeth Krumbach, who is the coordinator for the Philadelphia area LinuxChix chapter.

Research Looks at How Open Source Software Gets Written

Filed under
OSS

Computer software systems are now among the most complex, expensive artifacts ever created by humans, and some of the most sophisticated are being built by teams of volunteers as "open source" projects, where any programmer can read the code and suggest changes.

Hands on: Making Ubuntu even easier

Filed under
Ubuntu

In this article, we expand on a previous article that examined the update of a fresh Ubuntu Dapper Drake installation to make it more desktop and multimedia-friendly, by looking at the automated options. In addition, we take a closer look at Ubuntu’s KDE offspring, Kubuntu.

Desktop Linux distributions -- from A to Z

Filed under
Linux

There are hundreds of Linux distributions. This handy reference guide includes the ones we think are especially interesting for desktop Linux users -- from Arch Linux to Zenwalk -- and we plan to update the list on an ongoing basis.

Letter from Linuxland -- Part 3

Filed under
Linux

If you've been at all interested in Ubuntu, you'll have read what it's like to use when you first install it. You've got the world's best browser, some damn fine office software, a few games, a nice clean windowing interface and almost everything you need right there on the desktop. All that's true.

All you ever wanted to know about apt for Ubuntu/Debian Linux

Filed under
HowTos

If you’re like me, which is a debian/ubuntu user who likes to instal new and use(ful)(less) software all the time, then apt will be an important part of your life. It’s time too look into a powerful program used in the Debian world. Apt.

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