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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story IBM Power Development Platform Emphasizes Linux ISVs Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:54pm
Story Chrome OS and Android may be top desktop Linux distros in 2014 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 4:50pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 3:01pm
Story CyanogenMOD developer demos Android Mirroring to Chromecast Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:53am
Story Android Smartphone shipment crosses 800 million Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:35am
Story KDE Frameworks 5 enters Alpha stage Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2014 - 7:05am
Story This Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2014 - 7:53pm
Story Upcoming Features of GNOME 3.12 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Improvements to Bodhi's Chromebook Support Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2014 - 6:54pm
Blog entry Site Update (Updatedx2) Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2014 - 3:49pm

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 277

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: An overview of Ubuntu editions

  • News: Fedora unveils Plymouth, Sugar spin, Sabayon hints at major new features, Yellow Dog launches beta testing, NetBSD prepares to branch 5.0, CrossOver Linux
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10 Preview, Ubuntu 9.04 release schedule
  • Donations: GoblinX receives US$250
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Gentoo: USE=kerberos removed from the default profiles

  • Linux Void: Episode 11 - Hawking Pumpkins
  • (Poll) Which OS do you prefer?
  • How to install latest Amarok and digikam in Fedora 9

Is Ubuntu's Popularity Endangering the Linux Ecosystem?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

junauza.com: After I have read iTWire's recent article entitled "Is Ubuntu killing other distributions?" I remembered asking myself the same question when I noticed how Ubuntu is taking over the Linux world.

IPv6 in Linux

linuxdevices.com: This article discusses the advantages of IPv6, which in addition to a larger address space promises to increase standby time in devices, and improve performance in routers. It discusses IPv6 technology, as well as how IPv6 has been implemented in the Linux kernel.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex raises the bar

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: Each new Ubuntu release has raised the standard by which other Linux distros are judged. With the new Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, the focus is on mobility and 3G network support. I found Intrepid to be a fast and stable release, yet I experienced some minor issues that keep it from absolute perfection.

Ubuntu disappointment and data disasters

pcpro.co.uk/blogs: Ubuntu 8.10 made its appearence this week, and while everybody was busy touting the network manager’s new-fangled ability to handle mobile broadband connections, what nobody seemed to be mentioning was that it doesn’t actually work very well.

States Stand Aside as Open Source Bandwagon Rolls By

technewsworld.com: While some state governments have explored the idea of using open source software in their systems, the same gripes continue to hold back its adoption: Quality, compatibility and security. Some states make use of open source, but all stop short of mandating its use.

Open source Ogg Theora video codec completes beta phase

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: After a one year beta phase, the Xiph Foundation's free Ogg Theora video codec has been released in its final, "mainline", version 1.0. Rather than redesigning the open source compression algorithm from scratch, Xiph.org worked on enhancing the "Truemotion VP3.2" codec released under an open source licence by On2 Technologies.

Compiz Fusion News: Tons of new developments!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: The Compiz Fusion Community News for Nov 4, 2008 is now available. Topics include Improved startup time for compiz, Compiz 0.7.8 released, and Three new plugins.

OpenOffice 3.0 - the only option for masochistic Linux users

Filed under
OOo

theregister.co.uk: In a brilliant execution of public relations, OpenOffice.org 3.0 was released without enough capacity to handle the demand for downloads. Servers buckled under the traffic, and some of us in the media took the bait. Are people really getting that excited over an open source productivity suite?

What's up with the GNOME Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: It takes money and it takes new ideas to build a better desktop, both of which are being raised by the open source GNOME Foundation. GNOME is one of the most popular Linux desktop GUIs and is included in nearly every Linux distribution.

Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009 Review

Filed under
MDV

linuxbsdos.com: Mandriva Linux Powerpack is one of three editions of the Linux desktop published by Mandriva. Mandriva Linux Powerpack is the commercial edition, and costs 49 EUR, or 62 USD. In this tutorial, we take a somewhat detailed review of Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2009.

Also: Distro Test: Mandriva Linux 2009 Kde 4 edition

The Last Gasp for Linux on the Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

ibeentoubuntu.com: I've been using Linux on the desktop for almost eleven years now. I enjoy it. I understand it. I'm not likely to ever leave it. I also know that I'm in a niche market. There were predictions that each year would be the "Year of Linux" and we all know where that led.

Four winning ways to monitor machines through Web interfaces

Filed under
Software

linux.com: System administrators need to keep an eye on their servers to make sure things are running smoothly. If they find a problem, they need to see when it started, so investigations can focus on what happened at that time. Here's a look at several tools that let you monitor one or more servers from a Web interface.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Smoothly Transfer From Windows to Linux

  • Intrepid Ibex Release Party almost got arrested
  • What bloggers think of Ubuntu 8.10
  • Updating to Intrepid: Notes
  • Avoiding regressions more important than on-time release

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - November 3rd

  • Ubuntu’s Linux contributions
  • Top 10 improvements Ubuntu should work on
  • FSF Releases New Version of GNU Free Documentation License
  • Can Drupal beat Wordpress?
  • Mepis Fix for Mounting NTFS Partitions
  • Community relations key to open source success
  • Mandriva - Day 1, Day 2
  • Two additional ways to tail a log file
  • Fedora Classroom begins November 8
  • Filling the Open Source Usability Testing Gap
  • Acer Aspire One, and Power Saving in Ubuntu
  • Stormy Peters about Marketing GNOME
  • OpenOffice 3.0 Beefs Up Collaboration, Extensions
  • RPM Fusion For Fedora Officially Launches
  • 3 out of 10 Asus PCs run desktop Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 62 - Ballmer Island
  • There is a BBC in my Amarok

Why I switched to the OLPC—and why I dropped it

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

Richard M. Stallman: The One Laptop Per Child project, launched by MIT professor Nicholas Negroponte in 2003, was supposed to lead millions of children around the world to information technology and freedom. The plans aimed for low cost, enabling many children to use the machines, and free software, so they would have freedom while using them. I thought it was a good idea. But...

Motorola and Google become GNOME sponsors

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The GNOME Foundation announced today that Google and Motorola have joined the organization's advisory board and will sponsor ongoing development of the open source desktop environment.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Speed Up Linux Hard Drives by Disabling Atime

  • Installing Ubuntu 8.10 To A USB Flash Drive
  • Blender 2.46 Tutorial - Boning
  • Graphical Remote Control Desktops for Linux, part 2
  • Enable Apple iSight Camera : Ubuntu 8.10
  • TimeVault simplifies data backup for Ubuntu users
  • Simplify GRUB tweaks with Startup Manager
  • Using the zoom to view 2+ pages in the editable view, in OOo
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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more