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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Video of the Week: Inside the OpenDaylight SDN Project Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 6:27pm
Story What Does Your Linux Candy Heart Say? Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 6:22pm
Story Barbie runs Linux Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 6:20pm
Story China switches on to Ubuntu in hunt for Windows XP successor Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 6:18pm
Story How OpenStack parallels the adoption of Linux Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 6:16pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 4:17pm
Story Leftovers: Games News Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 11:52am
Story Leftovers: Applications Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 11:49am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 11:47am
Story VMware, Google, team to target corporate Chrome OS adopters Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2014 - 7:51am

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex (Ubuntu 8.10)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex (Ubuntu 8.10) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

One reason why Linux fits in the real world better

For the last month, every time insert one of the four pieces of 512mb ram, Windows (Vista and XP) get a blue screen of death on start up. But, just out of interest, I decided to see if the problem also persists with OpenSuse Linux. So I booted up the system and selected OpenSuse. OpenSuse started up (and worked) like a charm, like there was nothing wrong.

Synfig: the free software alternative for 2D animation

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: For a long time 2D animation software has been dominated by proprietary software. Synfig increases the 2D animation software available with a brilliant and professional piece of software.

Use nv, not nvidia drivers -> Save the headache

Filed under
Software

saigonnezumi.com: As the majority of BSD/Linux users, I use X.org for my X Window System. I decided to try the nvidia driver on my Arch Linux desktop. Arch has a good wiki to get nvidia with 3D rendering to work. I got it to work and was quite happy, for about a month at least. So what happened?

7 Apps Every Open Source Enthusiast Should Brag About

Filed under
Software

dailyartisan.com: During my years of Linux advocacy, I am usually asked a very basic question “what makes Linux better than [insert OS here].” I usually start with explaining that there are two fundamental schools of thought in the programming world. The conversation naturally goes from there to giving examples of Open Source programs this person might be using unwittingly.

"Kid Computers"

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cookingwithlinux.com: I went to my local Toys "R" Us and asked about "sub notebooks". The guy said that we didn't have anything except "kid computers" I looked over in the direction he was pointing and saw the "Eee" display.

Full Circle Magazine Issue #18

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue 18 of Full Circle Magazine is finally available. This month's highlights include: Command and Conquer - Package Management, Review - Urban Terror, and My Story - Ubuntu And Me.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Integrate windows Active Directory and Samba in Ubuntu

  • Best practice tips for Gentoo sysadmins
  • How-To: Setting up BGP on Vyatta

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Funny Mozilla Bugs - Open Source Humor

  • Fix bad performance with NVidia 177.80 drivers
  • Install Adobe Flash Player 10 in openSUSE Linux
  • OpenSUSE opens up to non-Novell employees

more ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • New Stuff I Love About Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • HOWTO : Lenovo Thinkpad scroll button on Ubuntu 8.10
  • update your gimp plug-ins on ubuntu 8.10

few for ubuntu fans

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 1 day with Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • 8 Reasons to try UBUNTU
  • Multimedia Support in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 44

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #44 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: Less than 50 days to openSUSE 11.1, Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election, and OpenOffice.org 3.0 final.

Faces behind Popular Programming Languages

Filed under
Software

yabblog.com: It’s quite fascinating to become familiar with the faces behind these programming languages, in which we spend hours learning or using it. Although the list may not be comprehensive but it contains almost all the popular programming language used in modern times.

A Visual Desktop Tour of 9 Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Ubuntu, undoubtedly today's most popular Linux distribution has been around for 4 years. Its first official version was released in October of 2004. In the span of four years, Ubuntu has already unleashed 9 stable versions including the recently released Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex". Let's take a visual desktop tour of Ubuntu starting from its inaugural version:

Ubuntu 8.10 is here. And it rocks!

Filed under
Ubuntu

I downloaded Ubuntu 8.10 "Interbid Ibex" today and i am currently using it as a Live-CD. Everything seems to be working perfectly until now, so i will install it tomorrow and suggest it to all my friends & colleagues if no serious problem arises. What did i like the first 2 hours of use?

Fedora 10 Cambridge - Review & Tutorial

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: I love RedHat-based distros. My favorite "server" distro is CentOS. Fedora is a community-developed distro, RPM-based, derived from RedHat when it turned into an enterprise product. CentOS branched off to mimic the enterprise releases as the server distro and Fedora became a household item. Fedora 10 Cambridge is the latest.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to use KDB in the openSUSE installation system

  • Install Puppy Linux in Ubuntu
  • Create avatars with MeMaker in Ubuntu
  • Fun with Linux Commands-III - Being productive
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Install using the built in USB Installer
  • The Linux Support Call HOWNOTTO

Compiz Fusion and X.org MPX and Input Redirection Patches are now out

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: I figured that I should publish these before murphy’s law ensures that I either have a 1% chance of living the next day, or that the Australian Government censors me.

How To Upgrade Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) To 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) (Desktop & Server)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Today the new Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) has been released. This guide shows how you can upgrade your Ubuntu 8.04 desktop and server installations to Ubuntu 8.10.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Operating System

  • Too Late For Halloween - Almost Linux/Unix Humor
  • Building Online Success With Drupal
  • BBC prepares to stream content free to Linux users
  • Interview: Chris Morgan on Jopr
  • GDM 2.24 aka SMB (Shoot Me Bloody)
  • Selected Ibex Bugs
  • Linux to out ship Windows by next year … maybe not!
  • Four True Tech Horror Stories
  • Windows 7: Microsoft's Linux killer?
  • New beta version of Google's Chrome browser
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More in Tux Machines

How Red Hat is making money on the public cloud with a hybrid approach

Red Hat hasn't traditionally played much of a part in public clouds, a fact its CEO Jim Whitehurst underscored in Red Hat's recent earnings call. Though the company is now dabbling in a true elastic/consumption-based delivery and pricing model via OpenShift, Red Hat remains a primarily on-premises business that only feints toward a true cloud model in terms of service delivery. Ironically, the hybrid cloud may be the trend that gets Red Hat fully planted in the public cloud. Read more

GE, Bosch and open source could bring more IoT tools

The two companies, both big players in industrial IoT, said they will establish a core IoT software stack based on open-source software. They plan to integrate parts of GE's Predix operating system with the Bosch IoT Suite in ways that will make complementary software services from each available on the other. The work will take place in several existing open-source projects under the Eclipse Foundation. These projects are creating code for things like messaging, user authentication, access control and device descriptions. Through the Eclipse projects, other vendors also will be able to create software services that are compatible with Predix and Bosch IoT Suite, said Greg Petroff, executive director of platform evangelism at GE Software. Read more

Unsafe at any clock speed: Linux kernel security needs a rethink

The Linux kernel today faces an unprecedented safety crisis. Much like when Ralph Nader famously told the American public that their cars were "unsafe at any speed" back in 1965, numerous security developers told the 2016 Linux Security Summit in Toronto that the operating system needs a total rethink to keep it fit for purpose. No longer the niche concern of years past, Linux today underpins the server farms that run the cloud, more than a billion Android phones, and not to mention the coming tsunami of grossly insecure devices that will be hitched to the Internet of Things. Today's world runs on Linux, and the security of its kernel is a single point of failure that will affect the safety and well-being of almost every human being on the planet in one way or another. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • ONOS Hummingbird SDN release touts core control function improvements
    ON.Lab’s ONOS Project noted its eighth SDN platform release expands southbound and northbound protocol, legacy device support The telecommunications market’s choice of software-defined networking platforms continues to blossom, with the Open Networking Laboratory’s Open Network Operating System Project releasing its latest SDN platform variant under the “Hummingbird” tag.
  • OPNFV Heads Down Colorado Trail
    OPNFV today issued its third software release, ending the agonizing six-month period in which folks had to pronounce and spell Brahmaputra. (See OPNFV Issues Third Software Release.) This latest release continues the river theme but is sensibly named Colorado: It has other advantages as well, namely support for key features such as security, IPv6, service function chaining (SFC) testing, virtual private networks and more. In addition, Colorado is laying some key groundwork for what lies ahead as the industry comes to terms with the MANO (management and network orchestration) dilemma, says Heather Kirksey, Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. 's executive director.
  • OPNFV's Third Release Includes Security Enhancements
  • ONOS, OPNFV Introduce Latest Open SDN, NFV Releases
  • OPNFV Issues Third Software Release
  • The Linux State Of AMD's Zen x86 Memory Encryption
    With AMD's forthcoming Zen processors is support for some new memory encryption technologies that are of particular benefit for virtualized environments. I wrote about Linux patches for AMD memory encryption earlier this year while since then more information has come to light. At last month's Linux Security Summit, David Kaplan presented on these technologies coming with Zen; only today I had come across the slide deck for this presentation. The technologies come down to Secure Memory Encryption (SME) and Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV). SME provides memory encryption on a per-page-table basis using AMD's ARM-based security co-processor. AMD SME + SEV are designed against both user-access attacks and physical access attacks with a particular focus on VM / hypervisor security.
  • Improving Fuzzing Tools for More Efficient Kernel Testing
    Fuzz testing (or fuzzing) is a software testing technique that involves passing invalid or random data to a program and observing the results, such as crashes or other failures. Bamvor Jian Zhang of Huawei, who will be speaking at LinuxCon Europe, realized that existing fuzz testing tools -- such as trinity -- can generate random or boundary values for syscall parameters and inject them into the kernel, but they don’t validate whether the results of those syscalls are correct.
  • X.Org's GLAMOR 2D Performance Continues To Be Tuned
    While GLAMOR has already been around for a number of years as a means of providing generic X11 2D acceleration over OpenGL for the X.Org Server, it's a seemingly never-ending process to optimize its code-paths for best performance. More improvements are en route for making GLAMOR 2D faster, which should especially be helpful for Raspberry Pi users making use of the VC4 driver stack on this very slow-speed hardware. Benefits to the GLAMOR code in the X.Org Server obviously have the potential to benefit all users of this acceleration mechanism for code going into the xorg-server code-base as opposed to an individual GL driver, but for Raspberry Pi users in particular there is some efforts ongoing by Broadcom's Eric Anholt as well as Keith Packard's never-ending tinkering with the X Server code. GLAMOR continues to be used by default for all AMD GCN GPUs, Nouveau for the latest generations of GPU too, VC4 2D is only supported with GLAMOR, and optionally by other DDX drivers too.