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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 6:46pm
Story ZRAM Finally Promoted Out Of Staging In Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 5:31pm
Story Firefox’s on fire with 500M users and 50M Android downloads for 2013 Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 4:47pm
Story Fedora 20 Released With New, Newer, and Newest Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 4:07pm
Story SteamOS GNOME Screenshot Tour Roy Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 4:04pm
Story Black Lab Linux 4.1.9 KDE released Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:49am
Story Google's robotics program has legs, but where is it going? Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:42am
Story Android 4.3 flavors Sony Xperia Z1, Xperia Z Ultra Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:36am
Story How And Why I Switched to Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:33am
Story The Open-Sorcerers Rianne Schestowitz 19/12/2013 - 11:30am

Cortex-A8 gaming handheld runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: OpenPandora.org will start taking orders this month for its developer-friendly Linux-based handheld gaming device. Set to ship in November, the $330 device runs Angstrom Linux on an ARM Cortex-A8 processor with OpenGL 2.0 graphics and a 4.3-inch, 800x480 touchscreen.

5 Great iTunes Replacements for Managing iPod in Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: We all love the iPod, but sadly, Apple is still not kind enough to provide an iPod manager for those of us who use Linux. However, this is not really a big issue nowadays as there are other means to manage your iPod under Linux. Thanks to these excellent free and open source media players that are certified to handle your iPod the way iTunes can.

Tracking Linux CPU Performance Statistics

computingtech.blogspot: Each system-wide Linux performance tool provides different ways to extract similar statistics. Although no tool displays all the statistics, some of the tools display the same statistics.

Fedora 10's Plymouth Might Prevent Boot

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: There’s a new feature coming in Fedora 10 that is going to be very apparent to users trying the F10 Beta as their first introduction to the release. Plymouth uses X modesetting to drop the aging rhgb graphical boot engine in favor of a sleeker, faster system. However, the feature doesn’t work seamlessly for every video chipset.

The First Three Netbooks To Consider

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Wading through the numerous netbooks available today can be challenging, so you might want to at least start with this list of the first three netbooks to consider.

Review: KLibido Newsreader 0.2.5

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: One of the things I've been forever in search of on Linux is a good newsreader, especially for binaries, since I frequently find that the various files I'm after (patches and distro ISO files mostly) are available only on Usenet.

Linux Promotion in Mall Kiosks

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: I have been attending Linux install festivals for years. Always fun, often educational and (in some cases) completely missing the mark of their potential for the people they interact with. There is so much more these same knowledgeable individuals could be doing with the general public.

Firefox 3.0.2 coming next week minus EULA

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0.2 and 2.0.0.17 releases have been pushed back by a week according to Mozilla's Mike Beltzner, with the EULA issue being one of three additional bugs that have been fixed.

Hard core Linux developers discuss the future of Linux at the Kernel Summit

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Linus Torvalds, Andrew Morton and eighty other important kernel developers are now debating how they plan to proceed with the future development of Linux at the Kernel Summit 2008 in Portland, Oregon.

Compiz 0.7.8 Arrives With New Plug-In

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Back in May we had the release of Compiz 0.7.6 with rewritten plug-ins and other changes to boost the vitality of this popular compositing manager. Since then all activity on the Compiz front has been relatively quiet, until this morning. Danny Baumann has announced the release of Compiz 0.7.8.

My display

A comparative look at compact sysadmin distributions

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Things go wrong. Hard disks fail and whole servers crash. Luckily, many Linux-based distributions are available to help systems administrators handle minor catastrophes. We looked at four of the most portable, all of which fit on a 210MB mini CD -- SliTaz, Parted Magic, GParted, and RIPLinuX.

Shuttleworth man heads to Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic.co.za: The Shuttleworth Foundation’s open philanthropy fellow, Mark Surman, will be moving to the Mozilla Foundation where he has been appointed executive director and will continue his work in open sourcing philanthropy.

GIMP 2.5.4 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP approaches the next stable release and only a handful bugs are left to be fixed before GIMP 2.6 is ready.

5 best-practices of a successful Linux user

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There would have been one or more reasons which would have tempted each one of us to try Linux, and some of us just never looked back. Few would have probably turned out to be Linux professionals, while others would still be struggling with what’s good and what’s perfect.

I want to break free!

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Freeme2 is a program for stripping the DRM from commonly distributed music and sound files. More specifically it strips it from windows sound files of the format wmv, wma and asf. It also can do the same from video and audio streams.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Can Ubuntu Overcome The Status Quo?

  • Microsoft hails open source outreach
  • Found: The World’s Hottest Ubuntu Linux Deployment
  • Review: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
  • OLPC rivals get 'vicious'
  • The Road to Geekdom
  • How to uninstall application in ubuntu cleanly
  • Grep: RRTFM
  • Tux3 Report: What next?
  • BECTA Back in Play
  • Shuttleworth urges calm in Firefox/Ubuntu flap
  • Change Boot-up options in Ubuntu

Firefox without EULAs — Update

Filed under
Software

Mitchell Baker: We’re still working on this. There’s been a bunch of helpful feedback. We appreciate this. We think we’ve integrated the feedback into something that’s a good solution; different from out last version in both its essence and its presentation and content.

Look Ma, No Terminal

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: A common misconception with Linux is that you have to know how to use the terminal in order for you to use linux. The fact is you won’t have to use the linux terminal more than you would use CMD in Windows or the terminal in Mac OSX.

Oldham, England Brings Open Source To Schools

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: It's good to see news about continuing adoption of open source software in schools around the world. The Linux-based lash-up they've chosen uses open source Squid cache and web proxy software along with MySQL and WebSense filtering and security software. MySQL was reportedly chosen because "it's free and simple to use."

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More in Tux Machines

25 things to love about Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever. At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time." To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love! Read more

GNU/FSF

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.