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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DHI Group plans to sell off Slashdot and Sourceforge Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 7:14pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 4:50pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 2:14pm
Story pfSense 2.2.4 BSD Firewall Fixes Multiple Stored XSS Vulnerabilities in the WebGUI Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 1:54pm
Story Standardisation process should be open, study shows Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 12:40pm
Story Open source runs Croatia’s geospatial services platforms Rianne Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 11:37am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:49am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:44am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:43am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/07/2015 - 10:43am

Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat: A Preview

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Mid-August is upon us, and that can only mean one thing - the next release of Ubuntu is inching ever closer to maturity. With the debut late last week of the third alpha of Ubuntu 10.10, it’s time to take a look at how Maverick Meerkat is shaping up.

Also: The New Ubuntu 10.10 Installer Is Live

Puppy Linux 5.1: Now Ubuntu Lucid Lynx package compatible

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The latest release of Puppy Linux, version 5.1, is codenamed "Lucid Puppy" as it is now binary compatible with the packages available for Ubuntu 10.04, Lucid Lynx.

Drupal 7 Preview

Filed under
Drupal

packtpub.com: There are approximately 38 critical issues that need to be resolved before Drupal 7 beta gets released. In this article by Trevor James we will install Drupal 7 alpha, test it out, and ultimately help to fix the critical issues and speed up the beta release.

Finding the Ubuntu font design

Filed under
Ubuntu

canonical.com: In our second post from Dalton Maag we get an insight into the origin of our very own Ubuntu font. Over to you, Lukas.

Nero brings blue ray disc support to Linux

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linusearch.com: Nero Linux 4 brings support for all optical disk including, Blue Ray disc support. The company that produces Nero Linux 4 claims that this is the only product to support blue data laser burning in Linux.

There's more to FOSS than the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
OSS

linux-magazine.com: As a Canadian, I'm always irked by airy statements by Americans that they won World War II. With all respect, I feel much the same way about the recent interview on Wired.com with Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation.

Most Beautiful GNOME Shell Themes Ever!

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: We saw the quiet evolution of GNOME Shell aka the next generation GNOME desktop environment. Now lets do some GNOME Shell theming.

Oh hey Wolf:ET Source

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames.com: Carmack mentioned during the speech that the Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory source code is being released today:

openSUSE 11.3 [Review]

Filed under
SUSE

thinkdigit.com: openSUSE is one of those few Linux distributions that gives you a choice of desktop environment while you are installing it, and doesn’t treat KDE or Gnome as a primary option. Both environments have equal support. This might not mean much for newcomers to the Linux world; however this does show that openSUSE is all about choice.

Tales From the Front: in Search of APT-GET UNDO

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I am currently in that level of hell reserved for people who upgrade their GNU/Linux system too quickly.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Confessions of a Windows 7 to Ubuntu switcher
  • Opera 10.61 released
  • Highlights from Day 1 at LinuxCon 2010
  • LinuxCon Day 2: Linux has Arrived
  • Granatier - A Bomberman alternative
  • The Battle for Wesnoth 1.8.4 Released
  • DNC uses open-source software to ease voter registration
  • Talking about Ubuntu Studio with Scott Lavender
  • KDE's New Default: Stripes wallpaper
  • Distribution branding and Stripes
  • Salix OS 13.1.1 Screenshots
  • What Tweaks Could Make Linux Even Better?
  • Chipmunk - GTK Last.fm player
  • Plasma: now comes for tablets

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Allow MySQL Client to Connect to Remote MySQL server
  • IPC Introduction w/ Examples
  • Fix Network connection icon disappear on top-right panel
  • Nautilus Location Bar in Lucid
  • Firefox bookmarks
  • All About Alsa
  • View HTML Files from the Command Line
  • Cool User File Systems: GlusterFS

Linux Security, Then and Now

Filed under
Linux

esecurityplanet.com: Linux is inherently not a secure operating system. The reason it's not secure is because Linux was based on the architectural design of UNIX, and the creators of UNIX didn't care about security – it was 1969 after all.

Also: Linux kernel report shows continued innovation 2.6.36 coming soon

Oracle sues Google over Java use in Android

Filed under
Google
Legal

computerworld.com: Oracle has filed a lawsuit against Google, charging that its Android phone software infringes Oracle patents and copyrights related to Java, Oracle said on Thursday.

Why this Linux veteran runs Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

softwarewhys.wordpress: I keep hearing Ubuntu described as merely a noob’s distro lately. Well, it’s about time people either come clean or switch already. I’ll start the ball rolling. My name is Karl (Hi, Karl), and I’m a Linux veteran who runs Ubuntu.

XBMC Camelot - Beautiful, stylish, classy, and fun

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Would you like to transform your television into a powerful media center with Internet connectivity, network sharing, video and music playlists, photo albums, weather forecast, maybe even games? Enter XBMC.

Linux is Political!

Filed under
Linux

idreamoflinux.com: I have had so many different discussions with people about which computer operating system is the best. Most people that I talk to swear by the one they use. I do think that an operating system should not be judged solely on its technical strengths and weaknesses but also on its ideology and the way it is developed.

3 Great Linux Radio Apps To Discover Great New Music

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Massive MP3 collections are nice, but they don’t do everything. Sometimes you want to discover new music, for example, or listen to the news. Traditionally this was the role of the radio, but if you’re a geek (and if you’re reading this blog I’m betting you are) you’re far more likely to be around computers than FM receivers.

Firefox 4 a big deal

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox 4 a big deal
  • Mozilla Looks Ahead to More Secure Firefox

At Work with Linux: Linux Mint 9 Gnome and KDE

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: One of the nicer features about the office lab is the fact we have a number of still-powerful workstations on which to run various operating systems. Linux Mint 9 KDE was actually the second Mint 9 distribution installed; the first was Linux Mint 9 Gnome.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, K

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.