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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:35pm
Story New Manjaro Linux Spin Uses Solus' Budgie Desktop and It Looks Grand - Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:34pm
Story You Can Now Run Linux Kernel 4.1.6 LTS on Ubuntu or Linux Mint, Here's How Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:32pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:31pm
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:28pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:23pm
Story 6 reasons to get excited for Android 6.0 Marshmallow Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:22pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:18pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Culture Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:17pm
Story GitHub Reveals Most Popular Programming Languages Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2015 - 6:11pm

Developers fork Mandriva Linux - Welcome Mageia

Filed under
MDV

linuxjournal.com: Everyone knows Mandriva Linux is in trouble. At best the desktop version is being starved into oblivion and many expect the company to disappear completely. The exodus of developers has been recorded over the last few months...

Linux-based signal processing system from Spectrum Signal Processing

Filed under
Linux

militaryaerospace.com: Engineers at Spectrum Signal Processing by Vecima (TSX:VCM) in Burnaby, British Columbia showcased their Linux-based signal processing platform -- the SDR-2010 at the Embedded Systems Conference in Boston.

Lost Luggage Studios "Anirah" Mac and Linux Versions Released

Filed under
Gaming

pr.com: Newest version of "Anirah: Riddle of the Pharaohs," a MahJongg-like math-based puzzle game, now runs on Mac, Linux, and Windows 7 for both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.

UNetbootin - Bootable USB Media Made Easy

Filed under
Linux
Software

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: I think that one of the most useful developments of the past couple of years has been bootable USB sticks. Not just "LiveUSB" sticks, from which you can actually run Linux, although those are wonderful too, but just plain old bootable distribution installers.

Memo From Novell to Oracle: No Oracle Linux Needed

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Call it an open letter from Novell to Oracle and the broader Linux industry. In a blog post, Novell Director of Linux Appliances Michael Applebaum says the world “doesn’t need a third Linux distro.”

Organizing photos with jBrout

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: Lately, I’ve been looking at a number of tools for organizing my photos. It’s not that I have a lot of photos. I’m just trying to find a minimal yet useful app to help me organize my photos.

openSUSE 11.3 Edu-Li-f-e - Amazing

Filed under
SUSE

dedoimedo.com: Edu-Li-fe is a special version of the mainstream openSUSE distribution, aimed toward education and entertainment, loaded with programs that can help high-school pupils, university students, parents, teachers, and software developers enjoy instant productivity, laced with fun and an ultra-refined, high-quality desktop experience. Sounds good, right?

Preview: ArchBang 2010.09 "apeiro

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: ArchBang, while not a badly-spelled version of #!, is actually inspired by (but not derived) from #!; it aims to be to Arch Linux what #! is to Debian (and was to Ubuntu before version 10 "Statler").

PCLinuxOS Progresses Undeterred

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: If computer is your hobby, you will, sooner or later, run into Linux. Most often sticking to linux depends on hitting a good no-nonsense distribution (like PCLinuxOS, Mint or Mepis) at the first chance. IMO, PCLinuxOS tops the list.

Are Platform Vendors Stealing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: Something rather interesting is going on in the Linux enterprise space, something which I think enterprise Linux vendors (and the rest of us) need to pay attention.

Texas Mint Tea, anyone?

What if … a new Texas-Irish distro could rise from joining forces of the current number three and number six distro "factories?"

Debian-Main Locus(t) Error

from XKCD 24-09-2010

Smile

Linux Desktop PC on Steroids From ZaReason

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: I asked independent Linux OEM vendor ZaReason for a high-end super-powered Linux desktop PC to review, and they delivered 8-core madness right to my door.

aptosid 2010-02

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Aptosid, for those who aren’t familiar with it, is actually made by the same developers that created the popular distro Sidux. There was apparently some conflict and controversy within the Sidux e.V association that resulted in Sidux morphing into Aptosid.

Ubuntu 10.10: a meaningless release

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Over the last week, I've been playing around with the beta of the forthcoming Ubuntu release - Maverick Meerkat or version 10.10 - which is scheduled to be officially unveiled on October 10. And I have just one question to ask:

The real problem with Java in Linux distros

Filed under
Software

fnords.wordpress: Java is not a first-class citizen in Linux distributions. We generally have decent coverage for Java libraries, but lots of Java software is not packaged at all, or packaged in alternate repositories.

Tale of two Ubuntus

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Two of the systems I planned on trying out with the Mebius were Ubuntu versions, one four years older than the other. Results were what I anticipated, although there was a small surprise attached.

VortexBox 1.5: Turn an Old PC into a Jukebox

Filed under
Linux
Software

linux-mag.com: Have an old PC sitting around with nothing to do? Just add VortexBox and you can have a Linux-based streaming jukebox in no time.

My Top 5 Favorite Free Software Programs

Filed under
Software
OSS

watchingthewatchers.org: Happy Software Freedom day! In celebration of it, I'll list the top 5 free software programs I use.

It’s Not That Complicated

Filed under
OSS
  • It’s Not That Complicated
  • Observe OSS best practices to avoid legal reprisals
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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.