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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Another Way to Try GNOME 3

Filed under
Software

fedoraproject.org: Frederik Crozat has been doing a fantastic job of making it easy to try out GNOME 3. To complement his OpenSuSE based live images, we are happy to present a Fedora-based GNOME 3 preview.

Four New Features Coming to Ubuntu 11.04 'Natty Narwhal'

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: The combination of Ubuntu Linux's growing popularity with all the big changes coming up in the next version mean that Natty Narwhal, or Ubuntu 11.04, might just be the most widely and anxiously anticipated release of the open source operating system ever.

NASA concludes first Open Source Summit, aims to make openness the default

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: NASA has been implementing an Open Government Plan for nearly a year, and this week they held the first NASA Open Source Summit in Mountain View, CA.

Something about Slackware

Filed under
Slack

linuxinsight.com: Slackware server hosting is one of the newest trends in domain hosting that is allowing many users to move from a Windows hosting platform. There are a lot of clients that are accustomed to Windows hosting, but loads of clients are seeking new hosting environments.

Libo Developer Interview: Christina Rossmanith

Filed under
LibO
Interviews

blog.documentfoundation.org: In this developer interview we talk someone who started with helping out other developers by translating comments in the code from German to English.

The rather petite Internet of 1995

Filed under
Web

royal.pingdom.com: As you may know if you’re a regular reader of this blog, sometimes we like to take a trip down memory lane. It’s time for another one of those trips, to the murky past of the Internet and the dawning World Wide Web of 1995.

What Would Be Crazy For Linux Right Now

Filed under
Linux
  • What Would Be Crazy For Linux Right Now
  • Exciting Proposals For The Linux Community

Spring Engine - Ready for prime time?

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Greetings, dear gamers, let's talk about Linux gaming! So far, I've given you ten lovely compilations, a handful of single game reviews and we've also battle tested The (vastly popular) Humble Indie Bundle, part 1 and part 2. Today, we will talk about Spring.

UMPlayer, Mplayer Fork With Interesting Features

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: I have reviewed several video players in the past that use MPlayer as a core component. This includes my favorite video player SMPlayer but also KMPlayer (just received an update to version 3) or MPlayer WW. UMplayer is another MPlayer fork with some interesting new features that you won’t find in the others.

Mozilla kills embedding support for Gecko layout engine

Filed under
Moz/FF

h-online.com: Mozilla has officially ended support for embedding the Gecko layout engine in applications other than Mozilla core applications. The move will have an impact on any application which has used the Firefox layout engine in their applications and the first to announce that it will have to make significant changes is the Camino browser.

Also: Open Source Camino Browser Faces Fork in the Road

Ubuntu 11.04 Beta released, reviewed

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Beta released, reviewed
  • Ubuntu 11.04 'Natty Narwhal' Beta 1 Released - Review and Screenshots

Linux kernel to be released under BSD licence

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Humor

itwire.com: The Linux kernel will soon be released under the BSD licence, kernel creator Linus Benedict Torvalds said today.

Spotlight on Linux: Supergamer Supreme 2.5

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

linuxjournal.com: Supergamer is, as you might guess, a Linux distribution whose main focus is on gaming. It's based on a lighter distributions, features a light desktop, and is chocked full of games and demos.

What Would Be Crazy For Linux Right Now

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Below are several announcements that would excite many within the Linux and open-source communities. Unfortunately, many of these are unlikely to happen in the foreseeable future.

Elementary OS Pulling an Elive - Charging for Linux?

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: So I caught a comment here about Elementary OS being released today so I headed over to their website to see if the disc had been released yet and I was greeted by a count down timer listing twelve hours left till release. Okie-doke count down timers are cool and all - then one of the buttons caught my attention -

My Move From Arch To Aptosid

Filed under
Linux

igurublog.wordpress: I recently moved over to Aptosid, and after a few days of using it I think it’s going to be a keeper as a replacement for Arch. While it’s fresh in my mind, I thought I would share my experience of moving – from the perspective of someone who has used Arch Linux for over a year.

Fedora 15 & GNOME3, initial impression

Filed under
Linux
Software

blog.kagesenshi: So I upgraded my machine to Fedora 15 last night using preupgrade, and spent hours in trying to clean up my /home from ancient stuff since way back to Fedora 5 as they were causing weird issues.

How To Install FFmbc on Debian Testing

Filed under
HowTos

Every once in a while I decide to install the latest FFmpeg/FFmbc on my machine. Despite all the recent upheaval in the FFmpeg camp, it is still a fabulous open source file transcoding tool. However, I am much more interested in these tools from a professional level, and thus now use FFmbc

Paravirtualization With Xen 4.0 On Debian Squeeze (AMD64)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen 4.0 on a Debian Squeeze (6.0) system (AMD64) and create paravirtualized guests. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other (e.g. a virtual machine for a mail server, a virtual machine for a high-traffic web site, another virtual machine that serves your customers' web sites, a virtual machine for DNS, etc.), but still use the same hardware. This saves money, and what is even more important, it's more secure. If the virtual machine of your DNS server gets hacked, it has no effect on your other virtual machines. Plus, you can move virtual machines from one Xen server to the next one.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • So I deleted Windows – but why did I have it in the first place?
  • Document Freedom Day: UK releases Government ICT Strategy in .odt
  • Unchain Yourself from Proprietary Formats
  • Here's The Special AMD Present For Ubuntu Users
  • GnomeICU is no more
  • APM, and the value in Linux
  • A year of openSUSE Collaboration ahead
  • Texas Linufest is just around the corner
  • aseigo: the fun in banging our heads together
  • On the road to GNOME 3.0
  • Slitaz Linux 3.0- An awesome Linux distribution
  • Why Ubuntu Should Not Worry About Adobe Flash
  • Indicator Applet: Applet to mount CD/DVD
  • FOSS Development Is My Full-Time Job: Patricia Santana Cruz
  • Greplin open sources Python tools
  • Snapshot coming to Linux
  • LibreOffice Portable 3.3.2 Released
  • GNOME3 live image 0.3.1 released
  • FLOSS Weekly 159: Newspeak
  • Debian Release Team - Kicking off Wheezy
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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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