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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

PC-BSD 8.0 vs. Kubuntu 9.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
BSD
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: PC-BSD 8.0 was released last week and we took this opportunity to deliver a fresh set of *BSD benchmarks. In this article we have benchmarks of PC-BSD 8.0 x64 against Kubuntu 9.10 x86_64.

You Can Finally 'Taste' The Ubuntu 10.04 Light (Radiance) And Dark (Ambiance) Themes For Yourself

Filed under
Ubuntu

The new Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lunx themes have landed: the Light and Dark themes are now available for all. The themes are called Ambiance (dark) and Radiance (light). The post includes download links for the new themes so Ubuntu Karmic users can also enjoy these beautiful new themes.

Full story

today's leftovers, part 2:

Filed under
News
  • A 2D GTK Window Decorator in Compiz
  • Arch Linux Reviewed
  • Choices Choices...
  • 20 Reasons Why Oracle is the World's Largest OSS Company
  • Do you know Ubuntu Games?
  • The road back to par: Radical changes for Firefox 4.0
  • MeeGo Linux for netbooks coming this month
  • Electric Green School motorcycle runs Linux
  • Rebranding OpenOffice.org
  • Google says PCs will be dead in three years
  • Little Things That Matter: Rhythmbox Indicator Applet
  • Would You Like To Help The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine?
  • Unite Media Player, A Widget for Opera
  • Earthquake in Chile Shortened Day, Shifted Axis, NASA Says
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #343 3/3/10

today's leftovers, part 1:

Filed under
News
  • The Uniform Driver Interface—why wasn’t it adopted?
  • Selective Disclosure, At Last?
  • Evolution of GNU/Linux system..must read for Linux newbies
  • Shiney new PHP for 10.04
  • Klavaro - A very flexible touch typing tutor
  • LA Funds Important Legal Research on Free Software Compliance
  • Ubuntu CEO Silber Pushes Retail Ubuntu
  • 5 open source and free software books that are worth your time
  • Linux Learning Centers Growing in Central Texas
  • Download wineasio .deb packages
  • Psion Launches the New Workabout Pro 3
  • It’s Crazy Ass Rumor Thursday: Whispers On RHT
  • Options Intelligence Report: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Which white knight will save Novell?
  • Unintended Consequences: Twelve Years Under the DMCA

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to convert RPM software packages to Debian (.deb)
  • Free GIMP Button Brushes
  • Formatting OpenOffice spreadsheet cells with DD/MM/YY
  • Subversion self tutorial
  • Using Restrictive Constructors in PHP 5
  • How to configure Compiz in Elive
  • How to create audio cd in Ubuntu using Brasero
  • Beginner's Guide to Nmap
  • Remmina-free and open-source Remote Desktop Client written in GTK+
  • How to view the contents of an initrd image
  • Run GlassFish V3 As a Non-Root Service on Gentoo Linux
  • Q-Tips: Speeding up Gentoo Compile Times

Musings on Software Freedom for Mobile Devices

Filed under
OSS

ebb.org/bkuhn/blog: I started using GNU/Linux and Free Software in 1992. In those days, while everything I needed for a working computer was generally available in software freedom, there were many components and applications that simply did not exist.

Hear that Mozilla Drumbeat? No, Me Neither

Filed under
Moz/FF

opendotdotdot.blogspot: A few months ago, I wrote about Mozilla's new Drumbeat campaign, "a global community of people and projects using technology to help internet users understand, participate and take control of their online lives."

Magnatune sends $614.20 to GNOME Foundation

Filed under
Software

blogs.magnatune.com: A long while ago, I pledged Magnatune to pay 10% of its sales due to Rhythmbox (a fantastic music player for Linux), back to the GNOME Foundation. Today, I wrote the check.

'Severe' OpenSSL vuln busts public key crypto

Filed under
Security

theregister.co.uk: Computer scientists say they've discovered a "severe vulnerability" in the world's most widely used software encryption package that allows them to retrieve a machine's secret cryptographic key.

Leeenux Review – Linux OS for Asus Eee 701

Filed under
Linux

gadgetmix.com: There are countless Linux distros out there for the netbooks. Do we really need another one? Well, if you still use the first generation Eee PC or have it lying around as it is of no use to you, Leeenux OS can give a new life to it.

Mark Shuttleworth: Light: the new look of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Jono Bacon, Alan Pope, and many others have written, yesterday we published a new visual story and style for Ubuntu. Here are some additional thoughts.

Microsoft's Linux Patent Scare Trumps SCO

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft's Linux Patent Scare Trumps SCO
  • Microsoft and I-O Data Sign Linux Patent Deal
  • Microsoft has stake in Novell fight
  • Microsoft's desktop future may look like a phone

10 things you might want to do in KDE SC 4.4

Filed under
KDE

hanswchen.wordpress: With the release of KDE Software Complication 4.4, many may feel tempted to give KDE Plasma Desktop a try. I’ve gathered some tips for new users to get a more familiar desktop, based on frequently asked questions I’ve seen in various places.

Can Ubuntu 'out-sexy' Apple?

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Can Ubuntu 'out-sexy' Apple?
  • Is operating system beauty skin deep?
  • Canonical CEO Elucidates on Lucid Lynx Linux Server
  • Taking Ubuntu 9.10 Netbook Remix out for a Spin
  • Canonical’s New CEO Discusses Top Priorities

CeBIT 2010

Filed under
Linux
  • CeBIT 2010: Linux Successes, Challenges
  • Linux New Media Awards 2010 Presented at CeBIT
  • CeBIT 2010: BIND 10 is coming

Top 5 Netbook Linux Distros: 2010 Edition

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: Who could have, just a year ago, predicted the dramatic changes in the netbook operating system world? The release of Windows 7 and cheaper hardware launched an exciting race for users between Linux and Windows, forcing both to take it up a notch.

Getting Loopy: Performance Loopers For Linux Musicians

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: A loop in music is a section of the music that repeats itself continuously until receiving a signal to either stop or move on to the next section. A loop can be assigned to a single instrument or to a group of instruments.

Lubuntu Gets a New Look too

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: A couple weeks ago, we took a look at Lubuntu, a lightweight Linux distribution based on Ubuntu. Since then, the operating system has undergone major chances that merit a revisit of its features. Here’s a second look.

Is Novell worth $2 billion?

Filed under
SUSE
  • Is Novell worth $2 billion?
  • Elliott Associates and Novell: Just a Game of Cat and Mouse

Web Browser Grand Prix: The Top Five, Tested And Ranked

Filed under
Software

tomshardware.com: We've put Apple Safari, Google Chrome, Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla FireFox, and Opera through a gauntlet of speed tests and time trials.

Also: Seven reasons Chrome isn't my default browser

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.