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Tuesday, 27 Jan 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A Concise Introduction to Free and Open Source Software srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 7:42pm
Story 9 Ways To Avoid Open Source Pitfalls srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 7:40pm
Story few points gleaned from time at informationweek srlinuxx 1 19/12/2009 - 6:46pm
Story Too early to declare victory in the netbook war srlinuxx 1 19/12/2009 - 1:00pm
Story Moonlight 2 hot on the heels of Silverlight srlinuxx 1 19/12/2009 - 11:58am
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 11:19am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 11:05am
Story Hug Your Favorite FOSS Contributors Today srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 1:34am
Story Linux Easter Eggs - Part 1 srlinuxx 19/12/2009 - 1:32am
Story Hands on: Moonlight 2 srlinuxx 18/12/2009 - 11:21pm

Mandriva 2007 Right Around the Corner?

Filed under
MDV

While folks were looking for a RC2 to be released today, news of the final being released to early seeders hits the Mandriva Club.

Mandriva powers up a serious business-server Linux

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux, formerly Mandrake Linux, on Sept. 14 will ship a major upgrade to its business server-oriented Linux distribution. The company claims that Mandriva Corporate Server 4 is fully compliant with the LSB (Linux Standard Base), and therefore should have interoperability with products from other LSB-compliant vendors.

Gnome 2.16 and Debian

Filed under
News

Gnome 2.16 is out... so when will it hit Debian?

How to enable numlock at startup automatically in Gnome on CentOS?

Filed under
HowTos

CentOS is a great desktop, but unfortunately, the NUMLOCK key isn't enabled by default when you start your computer, which is annoying when you start typing numbers and you realise it doesn't work as expected.

Dell's AMD computers now available

Filed under
Hardware

Following Michael Dell's announcement yesterday, Dell today released configuration pages for its initial AMD-based systems this morning. The computers can be ordered now.

RHEL5 Beta1 Client: Astonishment (scratch, scratch...)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

And it worked. The new RHEL5 Beta1, which is a public beta — so I could D/L and test it. Unfortunately for "them", I am not interested in Xen, so I don't even know if it works. I can say however that it looked speedy to me.

Linux-enabled ThinkPad

Filed under
Linux

At only an inch thin and just over 2 kg, the new Linux-supported ThinkPad T60p strikes the balance between productivity and portability, giving electronic design engineers the processor speeds and memory requirements necessary for industrial-strength applications such as computer aided design (CAD).

OOoBasic crash course: Replacement therapy

Filed under
HowTos

In a perfect world everyone would write in standard English and all publications would use a universal style guide. In the real world, however, you have to deal with different versions of English (British, American, Australian, etc.), and every publication has its own set of writing guidelines. If you write for several markets, things can get pretty complicated. But instead of wasting time on language idiosyncrasies, you can let an OOoBasic macro do the donkey work. Let's create a macro that converts from British English to US English. You can easily modify it later for other text conversion purposes.

Linux and tomato sauce: The cost of choice

Filed under
Linux

When a user decides to try Linux, they're overwhelmed with choices before, during, and after the installation. People don't want infinite choices. They sometimes want the ability to choose, but they rarely want to be forced to choose.

The Future of Hardware Compatibility Lists in Linux

Filed under
Linux

A while back, I made a comment with regard to how great it would be to have a single, collective HCL (hardware compatibility list) for all of the popular Linux distributions. At the time, I felt very strongly that if we had a one single collective database of hardware that was known to work with the latest distributions, life would be a lot easier.

Kingston HyperX 2GB PC2-8000

Filed under
Hardware

You want fast memory? Kingston has fast memory! Though not usually touted as the company to offer killer gaming memory, the HyperX PC2-8000 kit proves to be one of the fastest kits we've tested!

Book Review: How to do everything with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Reviews

If you're planning to take a stab at being an open source programmer then there are harder ways to do it than to start with PHP, MySQl and Apache. This book, How to do everything with PHP & MySQL pulls together both skills into one book which, frankly, makes sense.

Linux v. Microsoft: Third World Showdown

Filed under
OS

Those of you who have followed Silicon Hutong for a while will know that I have long been a Linux-skeptic, believing firmly that despite its obvious advantages on servers, Linux would never be in a position to displace Windows on the desktop.

Well, I was wrong.

Enable password aging on Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Password aging is a mechanism that allows the system to enforce a certain lifetime for passwords. While this may be moderately inconvenient for users, it ensures that passwords are changed occasionally, which is a good security practice. Most Linux distributions do not enable password aging by default, but it's very easy to enable.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand. There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest new features for laptop users in Ubuntu is network-manager. With this shiny new application it is finally easy to connect your Ubuntu system to any wireless network. Where previously you had to jump through hoops to do WPA or 802.1x authentication, network manager makes this completely transparent.

GNU/Linux vs. Mac: Why Apple will not dominate?

Filed under
OS

At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. It is a known fact that Windows still holds the vast majority of the market and Mac OS X is tied to computers made only by one manufacturer.

Desktop memory usage

Filed under
Software

This was actually supposed to be a follow-up to my tests of startup performance of various desktop environments, primarily KDE of course. I decided I should publish at least a shorter variant with all the numbers and some conclusions. You can do your own analyses of the numbers if you will.

How to set up a VoIP service with Xorcom Rapid, Asterisk PBX and *starShop-OSS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this howto I will show you step-by-step how to successfully set up a long distance calls service in your Cybercafé, using open source software. The main element is *starShop-OSS, an open source application designed to monitor and bill, in real time, calls made via Asterisk PBX. This service is commonly called callshop or taxiphone.

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