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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 11:47am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 11:46am
Story GNOME 3.10 has resurrected what was once the darling of the Linux desktop Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:58am
Story Facebook will trial Btrfs Linux file system in its data centres Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:33am
Story KTAP Dynamic Tracing Called For Merging Into Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:21am
Story Wayland in 3.12, and beyond Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:07am
Story Xen Automotive: Bringing Virtualization To Cars Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 8:26am
Story Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 is slickest Linux desktop ever Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 8:03am
Story Mozilla CEO Oops, Ubuntu 14.04 Beta, and a GNOME Review Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 7:53am
Story Linux Kernel Panel: What's what with Linux today Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 7:14am

Updating the Free Software Definition

Filed under
OSS Yesterday, we made some changes to the Free Software Definition to help clarify a few points that had been confusing for people in the past. Because this definition is the benchmark we use to decide whether or not a license is free, we want it to be as easy as possible for people to understand.

Five Features Perl 5 Needs Now

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Software Perl's 21st anniversary of release is next Thursday, 18 December. Perl 5 is already 14 years old. Though the language has seen many changes since 1994, it can't stand still. Perl 5.10 added many wonderful features and Perl 6 will change the landscape for programming languages, but what's the vision for Perl 5? How can the language stay relevant?

Why are Child Soldiers & Prostitution in OLPC Videos?!

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OLPC Joanna Stern at Laptop Mag asks "Has OLPC gone too far" with their latest promotional video, one that starts with child soldiers training to fight and child prostitutes soliciting for sex, before promoting XO's for children:

With HP in, all OEMs now ship desktop Linux

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blogs.computerworld: I have known for more years than I care to think about that HP has been almost ready to release a pre-configured Linux desktop system. But, then, they wouldn't pull the trigger. Now they have.

Also: Novell, Hewlett-Packard Push SUSE Linux for Schools

First Look: NexentaCore OS

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OS Recently, I read about NexentaCore, a new experimental operating system that seeks to merge the functionality of a Linux user environment with the OpenSolaris OS kernel, supporting the ZFS file system. I downloaded NexentaCore, currently at version 1.01, and tried it out using VirtualBox.

Amarok 2.0 Rocks the World

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Software After two years of intense development, Amarok 2 has become a reality! Some of the highlights that are included in the 2.0 release are a completely redesigned user interface, tight integration with online services such as Magnatune, Jamendo, MP3tunes, and Shoutcast.

New Notifications for Jaunty

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Ubuntu The big innovation (and controversy) coming out of the Desktop Experience team here at UDS seems to be the new notifications work going on.

Review: Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 adds speed and privacy

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Moz/FF Firefox 3.1 may only be a point release -- from 3.0 to 3.1 -- but its just-released Beta 2 version is a good indication that the final release will be a must-have upgrade for anyone using Firefox.

OpenSolaris as a file server

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OS A very fast SMB/CIFS server and the modern functionality of the ZFS file system make OpenSolaris a good choice when setting up a LAN file server.

Fedora 10 a Solid Linux Choice

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Linux Fedora 10 offers a broad security framework and new audit capabilities, and gives Linux enthusiasts and good way for upgrad-ing from Fedora 9. However, for those who use the Linux-based OS, don’t ex-pect any support from Red Hat.

10 Linux-based Gadgets Just in Time for Christmas

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Hardware If you haven't bought that special geek in your life something electronic yet for Christmas, here are 10 ideas for you. They're all Linux-based and are sure to bring a smile to any geek's face. They are in no particular order.

Using Linux to Create Holiday Cheer

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Linux I do not believe anyone needs to be reminded that this holiday season is going to be substantially tighter economically than anything celebrated in the recent past. This article will examine the benefits of making room for open source solutions this holiday season in the place of dropping a ton of money.

Best Linux/FOSS Podcasts of 2008

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OSS One of the most fun ways to get your daily dose of Linux and other FOSS-related news is to listen to a podcast. In no particular order, I have here a list of some of the best and highly recommended Linux/FOSS podcasts of 2008:

Ubuntu, Fedora, Mandriva, OpenSuse .. does it really matter?

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anojrs.blogspot: It's the perfect time of the year to experiment and look around. It's a season of new releases. Be it Ubuntu with 8.10, or Fedora's 10th release, Mandriva's shiny 2009 edition or the upcoming betas of OpenSuse and Vector Linux.

A Gentoo User Gives Debian a Go Around

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Linux A few weeks ago, I installed Debian for the first time on the desktop. I have run Gentoo for the past four years, and most of the times it's hard to 'learn' something else. However, I still liked to try and find out for myself if Debian was an easy distribution to use. So, how did I fare?

On Linux for Netbooks

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blog.wificat: After almost 3 weeks (and lots of late nights), my experiment with installing another Linux distribution for my Asus Eee 900 netbook has more or less come to a conclusion. After numerous installations I'm settling now with Mandriva One.

Types Of Repositories

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codeghar.wordpress: Many linux distributions divide their repositories into different parts based on certain criteria. It could be for support, policy, or anything else. I will provide a brief introduction here and link to more information.

Checking out the neighbors, part II

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meandubuntu.wordpress: More exploration with non-Ubuntu based distributions. This time I’m checking out Arch Linux and CentOS.

Sun adds goodies to OpenSolaris 2008.11

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OS Well, it may be December, but it is time for the OpenSolaris 2008.11 update, the second tweak of the open source variant of the Solaris Unix platform. With the new release today, it's getting some interesting storage enhancements as well as the usual update additions.

Ubuntu 9.04 To Get Nouveau Driver

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Ubuntu Nouveau still doesn't have a stable released version of its 2D DDX or Mesa 3D driver, but development snapshots of it have appeared in Fedora and a few other distributions. With the release of Ubuntu 9.04 next April, a packaged version of Nouveau will finally appear in Ubuntu's repositories.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.