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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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It's called sudo

Filed under
Security

linuxinexile.blogspot: Organizations can no longer tolerate the security risks posed by intentional, accidental or indirect misuse of privileges. You will learn how to securely delegate privileges and authorization without disclosing the root password.

Mandriva Linux 2010 Spring RC isos are available

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: Here comes the last development release for Mandriva Linux 2010 Spring. A few days left now before final release planned for 3rd of June. These isos are available on all public mirrors.

Novell Acquisition Bids Going Public

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell Acquisition Bids Going Public
  • Novell Accepting Acquisition Bids: Report
  • Novell: More Takeover Bids Coming?
  • Novell: 20 chances to reinvent itself

Review: Linux Mint 9 Isador

Filed under
Linux

cristalinux.blogspot: Linux Mint 9 (codenamed Isadora) was released just two days ago, on May 18th.

Open source software in UK schools...it missed the boat

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: Buying an Open Source solution is becoming much the same as buying a proprietary one...which is a good thing.

Danger from the Deep

Filed under
Gaming

linuxjournal.com: Danger from the Deep is a free , open-source World War II German submarine simulator....

Usenet's home shuts down today

theregister.co.uk: Duke University in North Carolina is where Usenet began, and today the institution is shutting down its Usenet server. The college cites "low usage and rising costs" for the decision.

Ubuntu 10.04 filesystems and boot times

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: I haven’t really mentioned it much, but the few times in the past month that I’ve used Ubuntu 10.04 have been rather disappointing. Disk access seems to be one of the biggest problems for me. I usually blame the filesystem.

7 (More) Best Free and Open Source CMS

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: This new set of CMS is as good as the previous list that we have so this should be interesting. Without any more delay, check out this new collection.

[Howto] RHCS: install on Debian

Filed under
OS
Linux
HowTos

Following our earlier introduction to RHCS we now present a real world example: installation of RHCS with Debian to provide virtual machines as services.

SGI advances Linux on the HPC front

theinquirer.net: WORKSTATION AND SERVER VENDOR Silicon Graphics International (SGI) represents how a once fiercely proprietary company has been able to leverage open source for High Performance Computing (HPC), much to its benefit.

The Experimental Nature of Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxinstall.net: With Ubuntu, Fedora, Red Hat, just to name a few having recently put forth their latest offerings. This will always be followed by the derivative distributions like Mint and Centos. So what is so great about all this new stuff? Well everything of course. Don't you want to be on the latest and greatest version of the Kernel? Don't you want access to new file systems like BRTFS?

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

gnulinuxuser.wordpress: Everyone knows that I pretty much lost my mind over Ubuntu 9.10, as the Karmic Koala sucked koala nu..well anyway, it wasn’t good for the majority of folks. So, when I saw all the changes that were coming to Ubuntu, I decided to give it another shot.

Also: Ubuntu 10.04 Test Drive

Linux Distros and the Codec Conundrum

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Is it ever acceptable for Linux distros to license codecs? Opinions range from "sure," to "never." No true-blooded supporter of FOSS wants to encourage proprietary codecs, but OS distributors need to make sure things work out of the box.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • HP Confirms Plans for webOS Slates, Web-Connected Printers
  • Another Educational Institute Opens Its Gates to Open Source
  • Codeplex hopes Walli can heal breach with open source
  • In love with “Digital: a Love Story”
  • Ubuntu _ open or not?
  • For secure access, try this limited shell
  • Opera reports a loss
  • Why Businesses Need To Work More Together On Open Source
  • Next Testing Version of PC-BSD Available
  • SouthEast LinuxFest names speakers
  • DtO: Everybody Panic!
  • Business as usual for Mandriva?
  • libface gets Face Recognition
  • Russel Crowe's Robin Hood Is Powered By Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Backup with rsnapshot
  • convert between packages (deb, rpm, tgz) using alien on Linux
  • Clean your registry with gconf-cleaner
  • Add Keyboard Input Language to Ubuntu
  • Write Your Next Program on Linux
  • When Telnet isn't Telnet
  • Using Linux to Disinfect Windows
  • Perl Debugger Tutorial: 10 Easy Steps
  • Why my written shell script doesn’t work in cygwin?
  • If Sound On Your Ubuntu Desktop Stops Working
  • Make your PClos Gnome 2010 look like PClos KDE 2010

Thanks, Yahoo, You Did the Right Thing

Filed under
OSS
Web

daniweb.com: It looks like Yahoo has reinstated the Linux/Open Source link on their Tech News page. Perhaps it was just a fat-fingered mistake or an accident of some sort that the link was removed from the main link bar but it certainly raised my hackles.

Pieces of the roaming laptop puzzle in Debian

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

people.skolelinux: Today, the last piece of the puzzle for roaming laptops in Debian Edu finally entered the Debian archive. Today, the new libpam-mklocaluser package was accepted. Two days ago, two other pieces was accepted into unstable. This collection of packages allow for two different setups for roaming laptops.

Fedora Elections are open

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields: During the next week, Fedora contributors will vote for open seats on both the Fedora Project Board and the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo).

A hungrier, more aggressive Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet.com: Mozilla's Firefox was born during a time when Microsoft's Internet Explorer had grown so fat and lazy that hacking off a massive chunk of its market share was almost a moral duty, one with a built-in fan club. "Anything but IE" was the mantra.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Servers and Red Hat