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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Development environments: Microsoft vs. Open Source

blogs.zdnet.com/Murphy: A few weeks ago we had a fascinating discussion here comparing the functionality available with the Staroffice/OpenOffice open source cluster to that available with Microsoft’s Office set. Today I’d like to start expanding that discussion into two related areas: one focused on risk, the other on developed application functionality.

An Old Dog Learns Some New Tricks With Puppy Linux 4

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Puppy Linux version 4 is a good choice if you're looking for a portable Linux OS, writes reviewer Jack Germain. You can load it onto a thumb drive and run it from multiple PCs, taking all your personal settings with you. Its tiny size comes with a few shortcomings, however.

Desktop search comparison: Beagle vs. Tracker, part 2

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Yesterday I discussed Beagle and Tracker with regards to their preferences settings, the time to index a collection of both HTML and PDF files, and how to extract information from individual files. In this article I'll go over the interfaces used to submit queries and the syntax used for complex queries for both projects.

Death of a filesystem (?)

Filed under
Reiser

nuxified.org/blog: Over the last months there were repeating news about the murder on Nina Reiser by her husband Hans Reiser, known in the community for his work on his filesystems ReiserFS and Reiser4.

IBM To Linux Desktop Developers: 'Stop Copying Windows'

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: Company executives call on the open source community to do more to make Linux popular as a desktop OS for consumers and businesses.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ultamatix - Ubuntu NL warns against

  • Gallery: Rise of Open Source at LinuxWorld
  • Open-source gadgets at LinuxWorld
  • Linux on Servers? Great. On PCs? Not So Much
  • Virtual Ubuntu: traps for young players
  • Open letter to the developers of TrueCrypt
  • Got XP?
  • USB sound card on Ubuntu
  • RipCode builds video transcoding device on Linux base
  • Ubuntu Goes Enterprise
  • How much would S10 cost with Linux?
  • Sexy, smooth fonts on (K)Ubuntu
  • Lenovo In Talks To Join IBM's 'Microsoft-Free' Program, Sources Say
  • New Firefox 3 Digg Extension Released
  • Stable kernels 2.6.25.15 and 2.6.26.2
  • Video games as the next open source frontier
  • Windows XP "not ready for prime time" on XO
  • Who's Paying For Open Source And Why
  • Ubuntu 8.04 LTS - whole load of apps going on

On the savannah, where the gnu roam...

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org/blogs: There are many services that will host your project's source code, mailing lists and bug trackers. While very few of these services charge for their services, most of them are built on proprietary software. Worse, some of them have started adding adverts for proprietary software in their mailing lists, or refusing projects with certain free software licenses.

The best news Linux could ever receive: LinuxWorld's a bust

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: The latest proof that Linux has conquered the corporate data center crowd: LinuxWorld is a dud. The relatively sparse turnout reflects that change in perception. Some parts of the floor at San Francisco's cavernous Moscone convention center were so thinly populated that you could have run a pickup game of Frisbee football without risk of smacking into bystanders.

Also: The Last LinuxWorld Expo?

Lightweight GNOME alternative emerges

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: A fast, fast-booting, implementation of GNOME aimed at netbooks and older hardware has emerged, and shows "a lot of promise." LXDE has already stacked up a heap of distribution partners.

GNOME 2.23.6 Released

Filed under
Software

gnome.org: FREEEEEEEZZZZZZZZZEEE! That's it. We're feature frozen now. This means what you have in 2.23.6 is a good approximation of what you'll get in 2.24.0.

openSUSE TV

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Some may know about the Geeko’s Tube, I’m not so sure that many do though. There has been for a while now tube.opensuse.org, this is the official repository of videos by openSUSE people.

Record your desktop with Linux tools

Filed under
Software

linux.com: You can capture video of all of the amazing things happening on your desktop with one of Linux's many screencasting applications. These programs are perfect for creating demonstrations for blogs and tutorials, and for illustrating projects with more than just still images.

Wine sucks and I'm not going to pretend otherwise

Filed under
Software

yokozar.livejournal: Wine is a lot like my cell phone. It sucks, but it would be really awesome if it didn't. As much as we'd like to, we can't give up on it entirely. So the only reasonable thing to do is try and make it suck less.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Cairo-Dock - Desktop dock for openSUSE Linux

  • Inkscape tutorial: creating a simple ribbon
  • Howto use SSH local and remote port forwarding
  • Faking filesystem access
  • Portscan in one line
  • VirtualBox in Gentoo
  • Ubuntu Linux Install GDesklets GNOME Program
  • Putting Ubuntu on the R400
  • Recursive FTP with the command line
  • Customizing Amonymous Comments In Drupal
  • Fixing Windows MBR with Ubuntu 8.04.1 Live-CD
  • Fix Your MTRR on Gentoo with Thinkpad x61 Intel x3100
  • A Guide to Linux Graphics Software 01: bitmap vs vector

Desktop Linux still DOA

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ft.com: One of the great tech non-events of the last few years involves Linux on PCs. Every so often, another wave of hype washes in about how companies are finally going to ditch their Windows machines in favour of the open-source operating system and productivity apps.

8 Useful Adobe AIR Applications That Work In Linux

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: While we have previously covered some of the cool AIR applications, most of them are meant for the Windows/Mac platform. For Linux users who are constantly looking for AIR applications, here is a list of 8 useful AIR applications that we have tested and found them to be working in Linux.

Today’s the big day: openSUSE Day at LinuxWorld Expo

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse: Hello from San Francisco! LinuxWorld Expo is going pretty well so far — we ran out of DVDs at the booth yesterday, which was a pleasant problem to have.

Reiser4 Update

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "I have had to apply the reiser4 patches from -mm kernels to vanilla based patchset for over a year now. Reiser4 works fine, what will it take to get it included in vanilla?" began a brief thread on the Linux Kernel mailing list. Theodore Ts'o offered several links detailing the reamining issues with Reiser4.

We Don't Need Another Linux Hater

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: While going over Linux Hater's Blog, I can best describe it as Béranger on anabolic steroids. I'm sorry if I can't find a better description than that, but for clarity sake, I would simply put Linux Hater's blog as a series of rants against Linux as well as other open source software.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.