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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung NX1 Review – In a class of its own Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 7:49am
Story The Real Reason Open Source Startups Fail Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 7:39am
Story IBM Offers Deep Discounts On Power-Linux Down Under Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 7:13am
Story Linux 4.0 debuts with the usual no fanfare Rianne Schestowitz 13/04/2015 - 7:08am
Story Arch-Based Antergos Sees Updated Install Media With GNOME 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 9:11pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 8:51pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 8:49pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots and Screencast Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 8:48pm
Story Ubuntu MATE Is Now a Partner for the Linux Hardware Company Entroware Rianne Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 8:47pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/04/2015 - 8:46pm

Hedge Fund Offers to Buy Novell

Filed under
SUSE
  • Hedge Fund Offers to Buy Novell
  • Hedge fund Elliott Associates offers $1 billion for Novell
  • Elliott offers to take Novell private for $2 bln
  • Novell Soars on Takeover Offer

Are Firefox’s glory days behind it?

Filed under
Moz/FF

tech.blorge.com: Firefox has, for a long time, been gaining ground in the Web browser wars, eating in to Internet Explorer’s still-sizable lead all the while. But no longer.

KDE SC 4.4.1 Out Now

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: KDE has released an update to the 4.4 series of our Software Compilation. Among other improvements, this update includes a fix for KMail hanging when sending emails that just missed the deadline for 4.4.0 and a number of fixes.

CentOS Pulse #1001 - The CentOS Newsletter

Filed under
Linux

With a little delay, issue #1001 of the CentOS Pulse newsletter has been released. In this issue we have a very interesting interview on the usage of CentOS at University College London, a report on FOSDEM 2010 (where nearly all of the main CentOS personnel showed up) and, of course, the usual categories like community, jokes and updates.

You can read the newsletter at:

http://wiki.centos.org/Newsletter/Latest

An open letter to Dell regarding Ubuntu, or “go big or go home”

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcritic.wordpress: With the exception of your two netbook offerings, I have yet to have seen you offer anything else that indicates to me that you have any intentions to make Ubuntu a real option for your customers.

Minting the Girlfriend

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: A few weeks back the girl I have been dating for awhile now had idly made a complaint about her laptop being poky at certain tasks. I like this girl a lot and figured it was time to take that next step in our relationship: I offered to put Linux on her laptop.

Keep Your Cloud, I'm a Customer Not a Consumer

Filed under
Software
Web

linuxtoday.com/blog: The cloud hype is getting thicker and smellier every day. All the cloud excitement is coming from those who hope to profit from it, the vendors and breathless tech journalists who can't think of anything worthwhile to write about. They're working very hard to make it sound like a wonderful thing, a miracle of rare device that will transform life as we know it.

CrossOver 9.0 Improves Windows Application Support on Linux

Filed under
Software

starryhope.com: CodeWeavers, supporter of the open source Wine project, have released their latest version of CrossOver for Linux and Mac. CrossOver 9.0 is a commercial product that makes installing Windows applications via Wine extremely easy for Linux users.

Topeka renames itself ... Google, Kansas?

Filed under
Google

computerworld.com: All that what missing was a promotional video of Dorothy Gale clicking her ruby slippers and whispering, "There's no place like Google; there's no place like Google ..."

Novell president's pay goes down to $5.7m

Filed under
SUSE

computerworlduk.com: Novell president and CEO Ron Hovsepian's total compensation fell 17% in 2009, amid declining annual revenue and a wider net loss.

CeBIT 2010: Knoppix 6.3 CeBIT Edition released

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: At this year's CeBIT Open Source Forum, Knoppix creator Klaus Knopper has announced the release of version 6.3 of his popular Live Linux distribution. Knoppix is a bootable CD, DVD or USB Flash drive distribution of Linux, incorporating automatic hardware detection.

Windows Up, Mac OS X Down, Linux Down

Filed under
OS
  • Windows Up, Mac OS X Down, Linux Down
  • IDC: Windows dominates Linux in servers, not just the desktop
  • Linux is doing just fine on servers

KDE and GNOME: Seven Irritations in Each

Filed under
KDE
Software

earthweb.com: Life in an Olympics-occupied city has left me grumpy. Ordinarily, I'm a tolerably contented desktop user, spending about three-quarters of my time in KDE and the rest in GNOME, with occasional forays into other desktops. But in the last two weeks, I've been noticing irritations in every interface I've used.

Ubuntu, Debian, Mandriva Installations on an Old PC

Filed under
Linux

bestsyndication.com: I decided to go the free route, because I was looking to have fun using the graphics, video, and music editing applications developed for Linux. On the journey of finding the best free linux operating system installation I learned a few things along the way.

Interview With Melissa Drapper

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

fridge.ubuntu.com: Once upon a time I wanted to be an environmental scientist, but during one of the projects for a related course, I ended up with the task to create a website. I learned HTML one weekend, and realized I preferred computers to trees.

Open source: Still room for the little guy?

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: Open source started small, but it's increasingly looking like it's a game for big vendors to play.

The Linux Desktop of the Future

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: One of the things I love about Linux is the ambitious and creative people behind it. Anyone with a text editor and a compiler is free to make up whatever strange software experiment they want, without needing to get approval from a huge corporation. With all of these amazing ideas flying around, it made me think, “what would the Linux desktop look like in ten or twenty years?”

[Howto] Introduction to Puppet

Filed under
HowTos

The administration of a large number of servers can be quite tiresome without a central configuration management. This article gives a first introduction into the configuration management Puppet.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • FFmpeg Project Announces New Work
  • Firefox afterburner for JavaScript
  • Swimming Upstream: Google's Open Source Social Web Aggregator
  • Launchpad Moving to Closed Source Auth
  • Florida State U. Pulls Out of Kuali Open-Source Software Project
  • Differences Between Linux And Windows
  • Dell’s “Linux Tax” is outrageous
  • Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) on Patents and Free Software
  • Talika- Switch between open windows in Gnome using icons
  • What's Wrong with Module::Install
  • Vulnerabilities in sudo closed
  • CeBIT 2010: Munich Shows Migration to Linux and OOo
  • Why Red Hat Surfaced at SAP Partner Summit
  • GNOME collaboration after London UX Hackfest
  • openSUSE's Henne: A Green Rock
  • DtO: Selective Perspective
  • CodePlex open source group moves beyond Microsoft
  • SourceForge.net March Project of the Month - Arianne
  • The Linux Action Show: Linux Mint 8 Review & Linux’s Eventual Unification

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Share Ubuntu folders with NFS
  • Cleaning Up Old Configs On Ubuntu / Debian
  • launching script dialogs
  • Howto Create a Gentoo Distro chroot Environment
  • 2 Ways Of Playing YouTube Videos Without Flash
  • OOo: Notes in Drawings and Presentations
  • Install unsupported Applications and Games with Bordeaux
  • Fixing Broken Images in OpenOffice
  • Flash Player 10.1 Beta 3 is Released
  • Useful Linux Command: pidof
  • How to Run Fullscreen Games In Linux With Dual Monitors
  • Setting up Monit on Ubuntu
  • Tips: Gentoo on a Dell Inspiron Mini 10
  • KDE4: KVpnc connections to PPTP Server
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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.