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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux is Evolving Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2014 - 7:01am
Story Synonym of Fedora QA – Adam Williamson Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2014 - 6:55am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 10:37pm
Story US Military To Launch Open Source Academy Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 10:20pm
Story Video: TedX talk - Richard Stallman Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 10:07pm
Story Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20 Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 9:42pm
Story Patch By Patch, LLVM Clang Gets Better At Building The Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 9:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 9:26pm
Story Wayland and Weston 1.6 alpha snapshot (1.5.91) Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Munich Council Say Talk of LiMux Demise Is Greatly Exaggerated Rianne Schestowitz 22/08/2014 - 8:54pm

Could this be the ultimate black and white converter??

Filed under
Software

jcornuz.wordpress: Converting digital images to B&W is a bit like the Swiss fondue recipe: everyone has a different version and each person is convinced to have the best.

Can Linux run everything windows does?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: In a recent comment to one of my articles it was mentioned that if Linux ran everything that windows does then windows would be out and Linux would be in. This particular comment started the Rube Goldberg thought processes in my mind.

Open source is (still) changing the way work gets done

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: Open source is changing the way work gets done. Yeah, yeah, what's new? We all know that. But really, free and open source software has changed the software industry in the past but it's really changing things now.

Novell cuts ERP outsource deal

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell cuts ERP outsource deal

  • Disinformation Disinfected, Pt. 1
  • openSUSE 11.2 M2 (Gnome)
  • openSUSE-Edu: looks pretty too
  • openSUSE Wallpapers 2009 Part 1

Back to the '80s with DOSBox

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: If the latest print edition of NZ PC World has made you all misty-eyed and nostalgic, I have just one word for you: DOSBox.

Behind the scenes on SourceForge's acquisition of Ohloh

Filed under
Interviews

news.cnet.com: When did the deal take shape, and how did it come about? To get answers, I asked Jon Sobel, group president of media at SourceForge, to provide some details.

First Look: Chakra Project Alpha 2

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Today I’d like to take a quick look at a distribution still in the early stages of development, but one that, in my opinion holds massive potential.

Rhythmbox: Let the Music Play

Filed under
Software

softpedia.com: Regardless of age, sex, race, ethnicity or birthplace, us people tend to have one thing in common: a passion for music. And no matter what kind of tune tingles your senses, you will need a music player to listen to it.

Better with Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxinexile.blogspot: I got burned this week; I actually believed the hoax that ASUS and Microsoft teamed up, and that an Asus.co.uk page was linking to a It's Better With Windows site. But looking at it again, I'm convinced it's a hoax.

Docky: Move it To the Top of the Desktop, Add a MacOSX-like "Genie" Effect and Customize the Icons Zoom

Filed under
Linux

Docky, the new GNOME Do interface in the form of a dock, is getting more and more used and causes sensation among GNU / Linux users.

Why Windows 7 Will Fail on Netbooks

Filed under
Microsoft

workswithu.com: Rumor has it that Microsoft has arbitrarily limited its definition of “netbook” to machines with screens smaller than 10.2 inches.

Linux is 'emerging'

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Where is Linux going? This is a question a lot of forums hash over and argue about constantly.

Swiss government rethinking Microsoft no-bid contract?

Filed under
OSS

internetnews.com: According to Swiss newspaper Neue Zuericher Zeitung, the Swiss government might be reconsidering its no-bid contract deal with Microsoft which has been opposed by a consortium of 18 open source vendors.

Windows 7 Vs. Linux: OS Face-Off

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

informationweek.com: While Windows 7 has been brewing in Microsoft's labs, Linux has been maturing. We look at what each operating system is capable of today, and how they measure up against each other.

Xorg's X Window innovation - it's not ALL about the graphics

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: In my last article about Xorg, I touched upon several points that have been in a state of continual flux in Xorg. Here’s a follow-up on that article, expanding much on some features and their implications.

Light, low-cost e-reader runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A U.K. startup called Interead will soon ship a Linux-based e-book reader claimed to be about 40 percent lighter than an Amazon Kindle 2, and over $100 cheaper.

Find A Kid To Fix It

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

primaryschoolcomau.blogspot: I also wasn't sure how the kids would go navigating the Ubuntu interface that is slightly different to Windows. Within about 5 minutes some of them had worked out how to use the built-in video camera, change the wallpaper, customise the desktop and discover nearly all the bugs that I hadn't anticipated.

Progress with Pardusman

Filed under
Software

sarathlakshman.info: I have came across lots of new updates with pardusman project. The first improvement is with the UI graphic design.

antiX M8.2 Test 1 now available and looking GREAT!

Filed under
Linux

usalug-org.blogspot: Here with antiX M8.2 Test 1, running live. Let me tell you why I like antiX so much as a Live CD.

Spice up your LUG!

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: Do you attend or run a Linux User Group (LUG)? Looking for some fresh ideas to give it a new lease of life? Read on and discover how your LUG meetings can be more than a general Linux-related chit-chat down the local pub...

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • What motivates the open-source community?
    Many of us will have been involved in a free-software community that ran out of steam, and either ended up moribund or just plain died. Some of us will have gone through such cycles more than once; it's never nice to watch something that used to be a vibrant community in its death throes. Knowing what motivates the sort of people who get heavily involved in free software projects is really useful when trying to keep them motivated, and a systematic approach to understanding this is what Rina Jensen, Strategist at Mozilla, talked about at FOSDEM 2017. Mozilla talks a lot about promoting innovation and opportunity on the web, and the organization does care a lot about those objectives, but the realities of day-to-day life can interfere and make working toward them tedious. The thinking was that if Mozilla could help make the experience for contributors better, then the contributors could make Mozilla better — but doing that required understanding how things could be better for contributors.
  • Shuttle Music Player is now Open Source
    Music is a major part of everyone’s life, and our smartphones allow us to truly enjoy our music anywhere. Over the years, Android has received a fair share of excellent music player apps, and Shuttle Music Player has managed to stand out. Shuttle is a music player following Google’s Material Design guidelines, and its listing is nearing 4 Million downloads. Currently, the app offers two versions: free and paid. The paid version is priced at $0.99 and has received over 50 thousand downloads on the Play Store already.
  • OpenStack isn’t dead. It’s boring. That’s a good thing.
    The first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering (PTG) event was held this week in Atlanta. The week was broken into two parts: cross-project work on Monday and Tuesday, and individual projects Wednesday through Friday. I was there for the first two days and heard a few discussions that started the same way.
  • NetBSD 7.1_RC2 available
  • NetBSD 7.1 RC2 Released
    The second release candidate to the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing. NetBSD 7.1 RC2 is primarily comprised of fixes since 7.1 RC1, and in particular, security fixes. The raw list of NetBSD 7.1 changes can be found here.
  • Pentagon Launches Open-Source Experiment
    With a new website showcasing federal software code, the Pentagon is the latest government entity to join the open-source movement. The Defense Department this week launched Code.mil, a public site that will eventually showcase unclassified code written by federal employees. Citizens will be able to use that code for personal and public projects. Code written by government employees can be shared with the public because that material usually isn't covered by copyright protections in the U.S., according to the Pentagon.
  • Coder Dojo: Kids Teaching Themselves Programming
    Despite not much advertising, word has gotten around and we typically have 5-7 kids on Dojo nights, enough that all the makerspace's Raspberry Pi workstations are filled and we sometimes have to scrounge for more machines for the kids who don't bring their own laptops. A fun moment early on came when we had a mentor meeting, and Neil, our head organizer (who deserves most of the credit for making this program work so well), looked around and said "One thing that might be good at some point is to get more men involved." Sure enough -- he was the only man in the room! For whatever reason, most of the programmers who have gotten involved have been women. A refreshing change from the usual programming group. (Come to think of it, the PEEC web development team is three women. A girl could get a skewed idea of gender demographics, living here.) The kids who come to program are about 40% girls.
  • Microsoft hasn't turned a phone into a PC just yet [Ed: copying GNU/Linux again]
    Using the Lapdock wired to the X3 charges the phone and provides the most reliable connection for Continuum. I found the wireless connection made things a little unreliable and choppy on some more graphically intense things like full-screen video playback. Connecting the phone is as simple as just plugging it in and watching a Windows 10 desktop burst to life on the Lapdock. While the Windows 10 desktop looks familiar, this is exactly when I realized just how limited Continuum really is. There’s a Start Menu that’s basically the home screen of a Windows phone, and access to Cortana, but there’s a lot missing. Things like putting apps side by side simply don’t exist in this Continuum world, nor do a lot of the typical places you’d right-click on apps or use keyboard shortcuts to get to the desktop. If you’re a Windows power user like me, or even if you’re just used to a standard window management system, it’s immediately frustrating.

today's howtos

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu