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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LibreOffice 4.3.3 Released with 62 Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:43pm
Story Introducing SIMD.js Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:35pm
Story Ubuntu & SUSE & CentOS, Oh My! Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:25pm
Story Paris extends smart city open source tools to region Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:23pm
Story Things I Do in Windows When I Forget It's Not Linux Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:18pm
Story Cool Devices and Demos at Tizen Developer Summit Shanghai Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:17pm
Story Weapons of MaaS Deployment Rianne Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 7:14pm
Story Russia's Yandex Web Browser Finally Released For Linux Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 1:27pm
Story Has the time come to rebrand open source? Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 1:25pm
Story Zentyal announces Zentyal Server 4.0, major new Linux Small Business Server release Roy Schestowitz 30/10/2014 - 10:12am

All Linux needs is a good commercial

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: The scene comes up with Larry David (creator of Seinfeld and star of TVs “Curb Your Enthusiasm”) sitting at a desk in front of a laptop. He’s obviously having a bit of trouble (in the way only Larry David can have trouble). He’s getting frustrated at something. He’s growing verklempt over an issue with his laptop. He’s picking it up and shaking it saying “No, no, no, no, no!”

Top 3 Mozilla Firefox 4 Features

Filed under
Moz/FF

spreadfirefox.com: Mozilla Foundation surely do not believe in resting on their laurels. Mozilla Firefox 4 suits the idiom perfectly as it is coming up with some features we could have never imagined in a browser. So let us sneak into that world.

Linux saves the day ... again

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What do you do when Windows will not boot and cannot repair itself from the installation CD? You fire up a Linux Live CD!

Linux User-Friendliness

Filed under
Linux

osnews.com: A reader asks: Why is Linux still not as user friendly as the two other main OSes with all the people developing for Linux? Is it because it is mainly developed by geeks? My initial feeling when reading this question was that it was kind of a throwaway, kind of a slam in disguise as a genuine question. But the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I felt.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Noteworthy Linux console fonts
  • Pidgin 2.6.1: The best Linux IM client gets better
  • Chromium popularity rising on Ubuntu, gains 64-bit support
  • New LGPL Python bindings for Qt slither into the light
  • Jolicloud Review on the HP Mini 1000
  • First look at Nokia N900
  • Mac and FreeBSD guy trying Debian
  • FLOSS Weekly 83: Web Comics
  • Test If My Graphics Card Has OpenGL Support Or Not
  • Powerful Remote Incremental Backup with rdiff-backup
  • Searching for multiple strings with grep
  • Speed Up Applications Load Time in Ubuntu - Preload
  • Increase The Maximum Sound Level in Ubuntu Linux
  • Headless X setup with Debian (Lenny)
  • Command Line Basics: Redirecting Output
  • FreeBSD: Benchmark The Disks Seek And Transfer Performance
  • small tip - How to play protected CD/DVD on Arch Linux
  • How to Control Startup Services on ubuntu

8 Minimal GTK Themes

Filed under
Software

d0od.blogspot: Below are 8 minimal GTK2 themes for your Ubuntu desktop. To install them either follow the instructions given or use the ‘Appearances’ dialog from the ‘System’ menu.

fcheck: easy-to-use file integrity checker

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: fcheck is a program that emails an alert when important files or directories change. This is useful for change control or detecting unauthorized modifications that may indicate an intrusion.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #156

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #156 for the week August 16th - August 22nd, 2009 is available.

Why do companies prefer proprietary products to GPL products?

Filed under
OSS

dmartin.org: I do understand why companies often prefer BSD and Apache products to the GPL. But what I don't understand is why companies prefer proprietary over GPL.

12 add-ons every Firefox user must have

Filed under
Software
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Having so much choice can be confusing, and it's often hard to tell which add-ons are worth installing and which are best left alone. So look no further - here's our 12 essential Firefox extensions.

Noteworthy Mandriva Cooker changes (10 August – 23 August)

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: Two weeks have passed, so it’s time for a Mandriva Cooker update again. There were lots of interesting changes in Cooker during this period:

Top 3 Linux Vector Graphics Editors

Filed under
Software

osrevolution.com: Who said that Linux has nothing to do with graphics editing didn't try one of these pretty nice and, if I may say so, production ready vector graphics editors.

The Sad Linux Facts

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

mossmash.blogspot: This year marks my 10th year as a Linux user. So I guess you could call me a fan of Linux. Fan enough to be able to tell you: its not going to knock Microsoft off its dominate position in business IT.

Which Web Browser And Why?

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: Over the past year, every major browser has undergone an equally major revision. Sometimes the revisions are reflected to the left of the decimal point, sometimes to the right, but always with big changes in functionality, performance, and under-the-hood optimizations.

World of Padman: Open-Source First-Person Shooter Game for Linux

Filed under
Reviews

World of Padman is an open-source, cartoon-style first-person shooter game available for Linux too, besides Windows and Mac. It is a wonderful standalone game based upon the Quake 3 engine.

Open-source world is his

Filed under
Linux

newsobserver.com: What did you do with your summer vacation? John McLean wrote software to help IBM automate the process of counting computers on its Research Triangle Park campus. Last summer, at Raleigh-based Red Hat, he developed software that helps control robots.

Review: Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher.com: My decision to review Ubuntu 9.04 first is obvious; it has long been the poster-child for the usable Linux movement and those familiar with my previous work will know that I only care about usability. I don't care how advanced the architecture is, or that distro-x supports up to 32 cores. I care about ease of use and how painless it is to get a fresh ready for everyday use.

Apple and Linux share the same design philosophy

Filed under
Linux
Mac

jaanuskase.com: I know. It sounds crazy. But hear me out. They are antithetical not because of the philosophy, but simply because the nature of the products that they make. Linux makes “backend” stuff, while Apple makes “user-facing”/”frontend” stuff. So, they do not compete. And their philosophy is similar.

7 reasons I choose Linux over Windows 7

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

abhishekrane.com: Windows 7 is all set to release on October 22nd 2009. This latest installation in the Windows series from the Redmond giant is touted as their best so far. People are going crazy over Windows 7 like Microsoft has invented some kind of time travel device.I do not want to disagree with the “fact” that Windows 7 is the best Windows ever but I want to point out that Linux is a 7 hundred times better than Windows 7.

Ubuntu with 256Mb … not so smart

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Clonezilla makes things too easy for me, really. Being able to snap between installations in a matter of minutes takes all the challenge out of the two or three hours — or two or three days, depending on the distribution — of reinstalling a system.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.