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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Implicit Save KDE vs GNOME

Filed under
Software

obso1337.org: One of the interesting things I learned at the last Ubuntu Developer Summit was the widespread use of implicit save in the GNOME environment. In many cases, implicit save makes a lot of sense and makes the configuration and interaction with options much more natural.

VPS Setup Part 1 - Update Ubuntu and Configure iptables

Filed under
HowTos

dailycupoftech.com: Since the whole VPS (Virtual Private Server) thing is going so well for me, I thought that I would let my readers know about some of the steps that I took to set it up. In this episode I will be talking about updating the initially installed image and configuring the linux firewall using iptables.

OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part I

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: This tutorial series will take you through some tips and tricks on migrating from MS Office to OpenOffice.org 2.4. You'll see how to replicate some of the functionality and features that are lacking in OpenOffice.org

Wine @ Work: Running MS Office and IE on Linux

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux-mag.com: In this article, I show you how to install Wine, Microsoft Office 2003, and Internet Explorer using my Red Hat derivative system (CentOS 5.1) as the host. You can give your system some Wine by compiling from source code, or by installing pre-compiled binaries from your distro’s repositories.

Package Management

Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Cracking Open the ASUS Eee 901 20G ultra-portable
  • More evidence of Microsoft "tying up" the Asus EeePC

ECS GeForce 8800GT

Filed under
Hardware
  • ECS GeForce 8800GT

  • Linux-friendly Beagle fetches $150
  • Diminutive green server for those with Linux leaning

Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

Filed under
Linux
  • Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

  • LinuxWorld 2008 features cloud, virtualization topics
  • Installfest at LinuxWorld could seed national program
  • LinuxWorld Expo Preview: Four Canonical and Ubuntu Linux Trends
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

A Quick Look at OpenOffice.org Writer 3.0 Beta 2

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta 2 is available in preparation for an official September release. Here are some quick first impressions of the Writer word-processor program.

KDE 4.1 Beta 2 on OpenSuSE 11.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

gordonazmo.wordpress: Decided to give OpenSuSE 11.0 a spin - wasn’t terribly amazed by the 10.3 release, but really curious to see what they did with KDE 4.x. Long story short, they did quite a nice job polishing it to look familiar to KDE 3.5.x users. Too ‘familiar’ and not enough 4.x’ish for my liking, but kudos to them - almost everything worked like you would expect it to work. Played around with it for like an hour, then decided to give KDE 4.1 Beta 2 a spin.

Will a $19.99 Ubuntu Succeed Where the Free Version Hasn’t?

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Canonical, the company behind the Linux distro Ubuntu, has collaborated with software distributor ValuSoft to sell a boxed version of Ubuntu 8.04 into Best Buy retail stores. Is $19.99 a better price point for Ubuntu than $0?

KDE 4.1: Good enough for ME

Filed under
KDE

jucato.org/blog: KDE 4.1 is coming! If all goes according to schedule, we should see it released in a day or so. I’ve migrated my main user to KDE 4 totally, except for a few KDE 3 apps here and there. I just want to share some of the things I’m loving in KDE 4 in general, and KDE 4.1 in particular. With screenshots, of course!

Economic clustering and Free Software release coordination

Mark Shuttleworth: I had the opportunity to present at the Linux Symposium on Friday, and talked further about my hope that we can improve the coordination and cadence of the entire free software stack. I tried to present both the obvious benefits and the controversies the idea has thrown up.

5 simple reasons to choose Linux over Vista

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: Linux enthusiasts have always touted for Linux to be one of the best operating systems ever. Their voice grew shriller with the advent of Microsoft Windows Vista in the market.

PCLinuxOS: Definitely “Radically Simple”

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PCLOS

blogs.techrepublic.com: The slogan for PCLinuxOS is “Radically Simple” and, as far as I can tell, it might be one of the most fitting operating system slogans I have seen. But does it apply across the board? From start to finish? I decided it had been too long since I had tried this distribution so I went about giving it a go. I have to say I was certainly impressed.

Sun dropping out of OOo wouldn't be bad

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Interviews
OOo
SUSE

derstandard.at: Novell-developer Michael Meeks finds strong words for Sun's management of the free office suite in an interview - Pushes for own OOo flavor and talks about KDE/GNOME-unification

World's cheapest laptop' now available

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxworld.com (IDG): A company is now selling what it calls the "world's cheapest laptop," which at $130, is not a bad deal if you can bear some hardware limitations.

A Non-insider's Guide to Free and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: For years I have been using and, in some cases, promoting "open source" software, but until a few months ago, I really couldn't have told you what is really behind that idea. I knew vaguely, but since neither I nor anyone I know actually would delve into the source code (at least not at this point), what does it matter?

Microsoft Joins the ASF: Can They Be Trusted?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

ostatic.com: Microsoft announced on Friday that it would be joining the Apache Software Foundation, which costs $100,000/year and is the highest level of sponsorship that the foundation offers. Bruce Perens, a well-known open-source advocate, cautioned on Slashdot that "there's much reason for caution."

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 263

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Guest Review: NimbleX 2008

  • News: Mandriva's 10th Birthday, Fedora 9 Re-Spins, openSUSE PromoDVD, and Foxconn Crippled BIOS
  • Released last week: NimbleX 2008, Foresight 2.0.4, and DragonFly BSD 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Musix 2008-7, sidux 2008-03, and Draco 0.3.2
  • Mini Review: Parted Magic 3.0
  • Reviewed last week: NimbleX 2008, Vector 5.9 SOHO
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly...

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The subtle art of the Desktop

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