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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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IBM: Linux desktops bucking the recession

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: IBM put out a study datelined one minute past midnight this Thursday morning commenting on the fact that outside of netbooks, the recession has largely put the kibosh on PC growth. There is according to IBM, however, an area of PC investment that actually saves money.

Desktop Linux For The Windows Power User

Filed under
HowTos

tomshardware.com: Well, it's that time of year again, when the latest version of Ubuntu is released. This article will walk you, the Windows power user, through the Ubuntu installation process from downloading the CD image to finding help online.

The one thing needed to move from windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: If you conduct any search on the internet, using any search engine, for information on moving from windows to Linux you will find a lot of information and advice on how to do it. In all the articles there is one very important factor that is missing.

Linux To Regain 50% Netbook Market Share

Filed under
Linux

oreilly.com: The past couple of weeks saw a flurry or articles debating the future of Linux on netbooks. Stephen Lim, the General Manager of Taiwan based Linpus Technologies, made the surprising prediction that Linux will regain 50% market share from Windows on netbooks by next year.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Hater, Bryan Lunduke, and Freedom

  • GNOME 2.26.2 released
  • Sugar Wins! Nobody Buying Windows XO Laptops
  • About Perl’s Binding Operator
  • Battle for Wesnoth 1.6.2 Released
  • Black Duck calls Microsoft open source mainstream
  • Hidden Linux: Virtualbox revisited
  • Developer Salary Levels, 2004-2009
  • New Firefox Icon: Iteration 4
  • New Red Hat Rules Tool Ties Java Developers to Business Users
  • Is RHEL5 the new XP?
  • 64-bit Arch and KDE 4.2 on ext4
  • The new economic imperative for open source app dev
  • Too many platforms?
  • Top 8 reasons why Linux rocks
  • Karmic Koala Artwork
  • Killing Virii with Gentoo and Kaspersky
  • Moblin v2.0 Beta: Linux Netbook’s Best Hope?
  • Linux Outlaws 93 - Danish Weekend

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to easily manage your Linux firewall with gufw

  • GUI SSH/FTP with gFTP
  • Simple firewall script tutorial for the command line
  • How to Install GDM (GNOME Display Manager) theme in Ubuntu
  • Easily Manage Duplicate Files and Save Storage Space
  • Howto enable ATI unsupported cards in Jaunty with full effects
  • Configure Kismet in Ubuntu 9.04 with Alfa Network Wi-Fi
  • How To Setup A Fingerprint Sensor In Ubuntu
  • Installing files on a PDA in Ubuntu 9.04
  • Mastering the Bash History

8 Great Linux Apps Worth Bragging About

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: There is such a wealth of great Free and Open Source software applications it's almost an embarrassment of riches, and we're going to look at 8 of them in this two-part series.

The new face of open source on Wall Street

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: Open source has long flourished on Wall Street. But the more dramatic shift for Wall Street right now is that it is considering open-source alternatives for fundamental, industry-specific applications.

Gnome 3.0 General Sociological Research

Filed under
Software

gnome.org: First of all we would like to thank the 1000+ people that took the survey in the margin of one week and thus contributed for a better gnome.

Comparing KDE 3.5.10 and KDE 4.2.2 memory usage

Filed under
KDE

usalug-org.blogspot: Recently I have been checking out the memory usage of various window managers and desktop environments, concluding with a study of KDE.

Dell: Most Linux users don't really need the latest version

Filed under
Linux

betanews.com: The new Mini 10v netbook that Dell launched last week will get more capabilities over the year ahead, including what the company is calling "wireless improvements." However, although "Linux enthusiasts" might wish otherwise, an upgrade from the currently supported Ubuntu Linux 8.04.

15+ programs you don't have to miss when you switch to Linux

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: Two years ago, the small business where I work would never have considered selling Linux systems. Times have changed. Many of their preferred Windows programs are also available for Linux.

In search of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: KDE and GNOME are the mainstream desktop environments for GNU/Linux. There are lightweight options that use fewer resources, such as Xfce or Fluxbox, but new users are more likely to encounter KDE or GNOME.

KDE4: The Future of the X Desktop?

Filed under
KDE

connectedinternet.co.uk: The biggest issue keeping the X desktop from feeling like a polished system is the presence of multiple desktop environments leads to applications being developed using a wide variety of GUI toolkits.

What Does a Linux Support Contract Buy?

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Companies that traffic in free open source software don't make their money selling licenses. They make it by selling support. What's that really worth? What does a company get for support fees?

The State Of The Wayland Display Server

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Last year the Wayland Display Server project was started and aims to provide a mini display server that is designed around the latest X/kernel technologies like the Graphics Execution Manager and kernel mode-setting.

Open Source Developer Intends To Block Belgian Government From Using His Technology

Filed under
OSS

techcrunch.com: Open source developer Bruno Lowagie is about to set a remarkable precedent in the F/OSS world by restricting any government body in his and my home country, Belgium, to use any product that makes use of technology originally developed by him.

9 Ways to Make Linux More Secure

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: The Linux operating system has already been proven to be very reliable and secure. It is often the most popular operating system found on web servers largely accredited to its track record in security, but can it be improved?

Boycott Novell attacks itself to get attention

Filed under
Web

adterrasperaspera.com: Am I the only one out there who thinks this is an admission that Boycott Novell did it to themselves to get attention? Several blogs out there have already started talking about it so it seems to have worked.

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GNU/Linux Desktop

  • Austrian Schools
    Here it is 2017 and Austrian schools are using GNU/Linux and folks are still having problems with That Other OS in schools. I was in a similar situation back in 2000 when I first installed GNU/Linux in my classroom. TOOS didn’t work for me then and it still doesn’t work for schools today. Any time you have a monopolist telling you what you can and can’t do in your classroom, you’re going to have problems, especially if that monopolist isn’t particularly supportive of your objectives. In my case, M$ was celebrating its monopoly and didn’t even care if the software crashed hourly. I later discovered there were all kinds of evil consequences of the EULA from Hell, like limiting the size of networks without a server running their software and fat licensing fees.
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  • How to communicate from a Linux shell: Email, instant messaging
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  • 5 signs that you are a Linux geek
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Security News

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Kaspersky: No whiff of Linux in our OS because we need new start to secure IoT [Ed: Kaspersky repeats the same anti-Linux rhetoric he used years ago to market itself, anti-Linux Liam Tung recycles]
    Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab, says its new KasperskyOS for securing industrial IoT devices does not contain "even the slightest smell of Linux", differentiating it from many other IoT products that have the open-source OS at the core.
  • Reproducible Builds: week 95 in Stretch cycle
  • EU privacy watchdogs say Windows 10 settings still raise concerns
    European Union data protection watchdogs said on Monday they were still concerned about the privacy settings of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system despite the U.S. company announcing changes to the installation process. The watchdogs, a group made up of the EU's 28 authorities responsible for enforcing data protection law, wrote to Microsoft last year expressing concerns about the default installation settings of Windows 10 and users' apparent lack of control over the company's processing of their data. The group - referred to as the Article 29 Working Party -asked for more explanation of Microsoft's processing of personal data for various purposes, including advertising.

Android Leftovers

KDE Plasma 5.8.6 Released for LTS Users with over 80 Improvements, Bug Fixes

Today, February 21, 2017, KDE announced the availability of the sixth maintenance update to the long-term supported KDE Plasma 5.8 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems. Read more