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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Building Super Small Linux Computers From Scratch Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:53am
Story Linux 4.0 brings Skynet closer to existence, offers reboot-free kernel patching Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:51am
Story Bella OS 2.2 Is a User-Friendly Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:07am
Story LMDE 2 “Betsy” Cinnamon released! Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:03am
Story The State of NVIDIA Optimus on Linux Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 2:00am
Story ODF in the age of Big Data Roy Schestowitz 11/04/2015 - 1:37am
Story DNF 0.6.5 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.6 Released Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 6:36pm
Story Git Success Stories and Tips from Puppet Labs' Michael Stahnke Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:59pm
Story A community distribution of OpenStack Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:11pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca KDE review Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 10:59am

US government rescinds 'leave internet alone' policy

Filed under
Web

theregister.co.uk: The US government’s policy of leaving the Internet alone is over, according to his top official at the Department of Commerce.

Google: good or evil?

Filed under
Google

telegraph.co.uk: It's been a difficult week for Google, which has been at the centre of antitrust investigations and a controversial Italian court case. Is the search giant's halo slipping, or does the 'Don't be evil' mantra still hold true?

Lubuntu looks familiar! – Hint: Xandros

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Lubuntu looks familiar! – Hint: Xandros
  • Kubuntu is awesome!
  • Ubuntu 10.04 to Include Chromium Web Browser

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Useful command line little tricks (part 3)
  • Change font and font size in Fluxbox
  • Girls make a point at Linux conference
  • Installing Drupal
  • Setting Up Hibernation on Linux SSD Netbooks
  • Is monogamy good for technology?
  • Kolivas Pushes New Kernel Responsiveness Patches
  • Miro – Slick open source video player
  • Canadian tax software and Linux
  • Novell’s SUSE Linux Milestone: Proper Perspective
  • PHP 5.2.13 addresses security holes
  • Qt + Box2D is easy!
  • Mandriva to be at the Solutions Linux 2010 exhibition
  • CentOS – update / install PHP 5.2
  • FLOSS Weekly 110: Webmin

The Perils of Sudo With User Passwords

Filed under
Security

longitudetech.com: The consensus among new Unix and Linux users seems to be that sudo is more secure than using the root account, because it requires you type your password to perform potentially harmful actions. In reality, a compromised user account, which is no big deal normally, is instantly root in most setups.

A Linux Rubik’s Cube

Filed under
Software

blog.tampakrap.gr: Recently some friends were spending most of their time in solving the Rubik’s Cube (3×3x3), finding new fascinating algorithms and reducing their time to the minimum. But as professional geeks they decided to take it one step further.

"Task Pooper" could revolutionize GNOME desktop

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The GNOME community's design and usability experts gathered for a week-long hackfest hosted by Canonical in the UK to shape the next major iteration of the GNOME desktop environment.

In Defense of Distro-hopping

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Brian Proffitt recently tackled the topic of distro-hopping over on LinuxPlanet. Proffitt wonders whether the practice might be passe or something to be discouraged, but it's here to stay and should be encouraged rather than looked at askew.

Why GNU/Linux for academics and why Debian in particular?

Filed under
Linux

cddesjardins.wordpress: This is an attempt to explain my position as to why I use GNU/Linux and Debian GNU/Linux, in particular, and why you as a reader, surfer, or couch academic, should want to run GNU/Linux and Debian.

Two Open Source Tools for Photographers

Filed under
Software

scribblesandsnaps.wordpress: digiKam is a truly versatile and powerful application for managing and tweaking photos, but it’s not the only photographic tool around. In fact, there are a few other nifty open source utilities that can make great additions to your photographic toolbox. Here are a couple.

Review: Linux Browsers

Filed under
Software
  • Review: Linux Browsers, Part 1
  • Review: Linux Browsers, Part 2
  • Browser Wars: The Sequel

Stallman and Free Software Foundation launch Day Against DRM

computerworlduk.com: Tuesday May 4 has been named as this year's Day against Digital Rights Management (DRM) by the President of the Free Software Foundation.

Pocketing Police

Filed under
Software

doctormo.wordpress: An odd bit of news from the xorg foundation. During some discussion on their mailing list about missing funds it became apparent that PayPal had simply taken $5k of their money.

iPlayer On, iPlayer Off

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The BBC's iPlayer has long been a thorn in the side of the Open Source community. Since it entered public beta in mid-2007, the BBC has consistently flip-flopped between completely ignoring FOSS users, serving them third-rate pacifier versions.

The Linux Desktop Expansion

Filed under
Linux

pcplus.techradar.com: There are three reasons why Linux isn’t succeeding on the desktop, and none of them are to do with missing functionality, using the command line or the politics of free software.

Analysis: Ubuntu 10.04 Keeping Pace, Or More, With Windows 7

Filed under
Ubuntu

crn.com: The Ubuntu community released Alpha 3 of the next-generation Lucid Lynx version of its desktop OS, and it's becoming increasingly clear that Microsoft will have difficulty putting any daylight between Windows 7 and the free operating system.

Beautify your Ubuntu desktop using the software center

Filed under
Ubuntu

mybroadband.co.za/blogs: There is nothing wrong with wanting to spruce up your computing environment. Sure there are those who live and breathe more than comfortably in a console environment but if you function in a GUI then appearances can matter.

Say, this is almost as easy as Linux!

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

blogs.computerworld.com: But next morning it's fish who gets a panicked call from the user, who tells fish that nothing is working and can he please come right over to take a look? Fish knows he's not up on the latest Windows issues, so he heads to the user's desk with a bit of trepidation.

Mint Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: A couple of weeks back I was talking with my Dad about what to do with his nearly-antiquated laptop (meaning from 2002.) Having had recent experience with lightweight linux distros and window managers, I decided to shop around a bit and see what else was out there.

Early peak into Gnome 3’s potential

Filed under
Software

gnome.org/seth: I am stoked to be designing a Gnome that kicks ass for hackers too. McCann is right: the ‘choice‘ between design for office monkeys and hacking monkeys is a false dichotomy.

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More in Tux Machines

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more

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  • AKiTiO Node: Testing NVIDIA eGPU Support in Ubuntu 17.10
    Ever since the announcement of Intel’s Thunderbolt 3 technology there has been external graphics card (eGPU) support. Unfortunately for most of last year, including with Intel’s own Skull Canyon NUC, putting this solution to use was challenging at best. Most motherboards didn’t fully support the technology and those that did typically required a system that was far more expensive. For example, the Skull Canyon NUC at release was $700, unconfigured. Adding SSDs and RAM usually bumped that up well over $1000.
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  • Vivaldi 1.12 Web Browser Debuts with Highly Requested Features, Improvements
    Vivaldi, the Chromium-based web browser designed with the power user in mind, has been recently updated to version 1.12, a release that introduces highly requested features and a whole lot of under-the-hood improvements. There are three big new features implemented in Vivaldi 1.12. The first is a built-in Image Properties feature that works when you right-click on an image on the Web, showing you a bunch of useful information, such as camera model, depth of field, ISO sensitivity, focal length, exposure, histogram, time and date, and white balance.
  • Chromium Will Soon Let You Browse the Web in VR with a Daydream View Headset
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort posted today on his Google+ profile information regarding the VR (Virtual Reality) capabilities of the open-source web browser, which is the base of Chrome OS and Google Chrome. It would appear that the Chromium team is working on a set of new virtual reality features for the web browser, which means that more VR goodies are coming to popular Chromium-based web browsers like Opera, Vivaldi, and Google Chrome.
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    HUION PenTablet devices are graphics tablet devices aimed at artists. These tablets tend to aim for the lower end of the market, driver support is often somewhere between meh and disappointing. The DIGImend project used to take care of them, but with that out of the picture, the bugs bubble up to userspace more often.