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Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story City of Turin to move to open source desktops Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:32am
Story Ubuntu Touch RTM Preview – Ditching Android Just Got Easier Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:24am
Story Twitter engineer joins Mesosphere to push the open-source project he helped make Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:56am
Story [Wallpapers] Samsung Gear 2 / Gear 2 Neo and Galaxy Backgrounds Vol 26 Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:26am
Story MediaTek launches developer portal, debuts Android SDK Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:04am
Story The skinny on thin Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:28pm
Story CipherShed: A replacement for TrueCrypt Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Red Hat CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:21pm
Story PyPy 2.4 - Snow White Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:15pm
Story Brocade Unveils Vyatta SDN Controller Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:12pm

17 Web Browsers for Linux

Filed under
Software

repasik.com: There are many web browsers for Linux, but everyone has different needs, some prefer customizable browsers with all the wizz and bang of plugins and themes, while others prefer lighter browsers that don’t have so many features and add-ons.

A tale of 2 distros, Ubuntu to Fedora

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

techmoments.com: Fedora, following Ubuntu, was the next major Linux distribution to rev to a new release. This one is fedora 11. It continues along history of subtle and not so subtle refinements of the distribution.

Codecs Should Be Bundled

Filed under
Software

linuxloop.com: One of the most problematic new user challenges in Linux is the problem of codecs and DVD playback. These are major challenges, since they cannot be legally included with existing Linux distributinos without paying a per-user license fee.

How open source is growing up

Filed under
OSS

bbc.co.uk: There is no doubt that free technologies, mainly open source software, are proving more popular both inside and outside the computer industry.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME and KDE developer conference begins on Gran Canaria

  • Canonical Party Welcomes Gran Canaria Desktop Summit
  • KDE Updates
  • USB 3.0 Equipped PCs Will Be Shipping by End of the Year
  • Apple, Linux exempt from Chinese filter
  • Working With Upstream: An Interview with Laszlo Peter
  • Ubuntu 9.04 desktop edition
  • The neverending fun of debugging a debugger
  • Firefox 3.5 Hits 10 Million Downloads
  • firefoxes are cute
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.4.7.3 released
  • Ubuntu 9.04 on the IBM T60 – going Linux full time?
  • Microsoft weighs next-phase in open-source support
  • Jackalope Seems to be Jaunty Enough
  • Opera Unite Review - Potential Not Fully Realised
  • Three Open Source E-book Readers Worth a Look
  • Microsoft Keeps Beating a Dead Browser
  • Mixxx-ing Tracks on Linux
  • Podcast 58 Gentoo Developer Diego E. Petteno (Flameeyes)

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How-To: Install KDE 4.3 RC1 in Kubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

  • How To Fix Full-Screen Flash Videos in Linux & Firefox
  • Postgresql: show tables, show databases, show columns
  • Stream Music with the Last.fm Client on Ubuntu
  • LMMS - Linux MultiMedia Studio
  • Tutorial : Easily multibooot Windows 7 with Linux
  • Enabling Accent Marks on a U.S. Keyboard in Ubuntu
  • Force Firefox To Open Links In Same Tab
  • Thunderbird localmail Spool
  • How to Set Up a TiVo Media Server on Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla Rushing to Fix Firefox 3.5 Bugs

Filed under
Moz/FF

eweek.com: Mozilla plans to release a patched version of its latest browser, to be named Firefox 3.5.1, in response to certain bugs that have revealed themselves following Firefox 3.5's June 30 release.

Fight Club: Windows 7 vs Mandriva 2009.1

Filed under
Microsoft
MDV

linuxforu.com: The war has begun. Quite literally. We laid our hands on the RC (release candidate) available for free on Microsoft’s website, and took it for a spin against Mandriva 2009.1 Spring. Who won? The results are most surprising!

Atari 7800 goes open source

Filed under
Gaming

programmerfish.com: Remember the Dig Dug or Centipede or Robotron? They used to be favorites when Atari’s 7800 series was still around. Now since the era of those consoles is over and a different world of interactive reality gaming has taken over, Atari has unofficially released source code of over 15 games for the coders and enthusiasts to admire.

Microsoft And Linux Hold Peace Tweets

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

techcrunch.com: Okay, it’s not exactly the Camp David Summit that took place in 2000 between the Israelis and the Palestinians, but sometimes the littlest gestures can go a long way.

Plasma in KDE 4.4

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Each release of Plasma over the 18 months since its debut release has marked an impressive step forward in its evolution. We are planning on making 4.4, our second anniversary release coming in January 2010.

Linux for Anyone?

Filed under
Linux

fullmetalgerbil.com: Over the past couple of months or so I’ve mentioned how Slackware isn’t exactly beginner-prohibitive. I still believe that, and going even further I’ll say that basically anyone can run Linux using a good solid starter distribution like Ubuntu, Mint or Zenwalk (or any number of others actually, or even PCBSD).

Claws Mail: The unsung powerhouse email client

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: I have used so many email clients over the years. For the last few years my go-to email client has been Thunderbird. Lately, however, I have really been taken in by Claws Mail.

Can Linux do BitLocker better than Windows 7?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

betanews.com: Our subject today is full-disk encryption, that useful security tool that keeps data on your hard drive safe even if the drive itself is in peril. We'll compare the Windows approach to the problem with that of a leading Linux contender.

Why MIDs have yet to soar

raiden.net: One of the topics I've seen of late is that, according to general sales numbers, Netbooks soared and were a huge success, while Mobile Internet Devices (MID) more or less did an epic faceplant and a fail of monumental proportions.

Why do you Like Microsoft?

Filed under
Microsoft

doctormo.wordpress: I have no interest in dealing with Microsoft, no partnerships, no trust, no respect, their name is dirt to me and socially they are a pariah. Not because of some fundamentalism or because I have an unwarranted grudge; But because they do harm to my communities.

KeepNote: Viable Alternative to NoteCase

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: NoteCase has always been an indispensable application in my productivity toolbox. So the news that NoteCase's developer ceased its development sent me scrambling for a replacement.

Mono developer uses f-word to abuse RMS

itwire.com: Novell vice-president Miguel de Icaza's Mono project has the ability to attract the right kind of developer to its ranks.

$250 Desktop Runs Ubuntu, Windows 7 and OS X?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

starryhope.com: I recently wanted to get a new desktop computer to use for some programming projects. Can I get by with something as cheap as this $90 CPU/motherboard combo? Could I run Ubuntu, Windows 7 and OS X all on this dirt cheap hardware?

VirtualBox 3.0.0 is amazing!

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: Just a few days ago, VirtualBox 3.0.0 has been released amidst a flurry of excitement. This was a great opportunity to see how well it fares, both against its predecessors and VMware Server.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more