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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Kernel Log – Coming in 2.6.31 - Part 3: Storage and file systems

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Linux

h-online.com: The experimental file system Btrfs, billed as the "next generation file system for Linux", should now be even faster. Libata drivers for IDE/PATA adaptors are pushing aside the IDE subsystem.

Pimp Your Ubuntu With Ubuntu Tweak!

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxologist.com: Ubuntu has grown to be one of the easiest distros to use which propelled it to be the most popular Linux flavor currently available. But guess what? Tweaking Ubuntu has can get a lot easier!

Gimp for Beginners Part 1

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GIMP
HowTos

techenclave.com: This is the first part of The Gimp beginner series I am writing for LFY. The first part consist of user Interface introduction. So download the pdf and get started with Gimp.

The Gnome-Do Weather Docklet – Totally Awesome

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Software
HowTos

d0od.blogspot: Gnome-Do comes with a variety of different docklets for use with it’s ‘Docky’ interface. The Weather Docklet is even more useful than these to me, and can provide up-to a 6 day forecast right inside your dock!

digiKam is da blast!

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Software

dedoimedo.com: I have never paid much attention to digiKam until a friend at a forum I frequent suggested it as a worthy addition to the Users' recommendation section in my New cool list of Linux must have programs. Boy, digiKam is a great surprise! Follow me for a spin.

Moonlight 2.0 goes Beta

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Software

LMMS: The Linux MultiMedia Studio

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Software

linuxjournal.com: LMMS is music creation software similar to programs such as GarageBand for OSX and FL Studio for Windows. Those programs are designed to streamline the process of making music with a computer in order to get new users into music composition as quickly and painlessly as possible.

Mini Review: PCLinuxOS 2009.2

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PCLOS

raiden.net: One of the distros I have the pleasure of working with quite often is PcLinuxOS. It was the very first distribution we reviewed, and it's still one of our top recommended distributions.

Enhanced Command-Not-Found Hook in Ubuntu 9.10

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Ubuntu

workswithu.com: One of the less prominent Ubuntu features that has received an overhaul for Karmic is the command-not-found handle, which helps users find the program they’re looking for when they type an unrecognized command in the terminal.

Linux Mint: Your Best Choice for a Desktop Linux OS

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Linux

makeuseof.com: Ubuntu has been heralded by many as the apogee of the user-friendly, consumer driven Linux distribution. But what if there was an even better alternative?

4 Little-Known KDE Apps You'll Really Like

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Software

ostatic.com/blog: Users of the KDE desktop know it has a dozens of handy tools and functions built right in, but the beauty of open source means you can tweak it to your heart's content by adding extra plugins to make your desktop do even more. Here are five KDE desktop applications that you might not have ever heard of, but are definitely worth checking out.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 316

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Report: The status of Intel video drivers for Linux

  • Tips and tricks: Running Fedora "Rawhide"
  • News: Ubuntu updates netbook remix interface, Novell assigns dedicated openSUSE team, FreeBSD sprints towards next release, LWN analyses recent CentOS troubles, updates on Foresight Linux and GoboLinux
  • Released last week: Parted Magic 4.4, Linux From Scratch 6.5
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 12 Alpha, Mandriva Linux 2010 Beta
  • New additions: Dragora GNU/Linux, Firefly Linux
  • New distributions: PenaOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

The greatest open source software of all time

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OSS

infoworld.com: InfoWorld's Open Source Hall of Fame recognizes the 36 most useful and important free open source software projects in history (and today)

Happy sweet 16 Debian - where now?

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Linux

blog.internetnews.com: The Debian Linux distribution celebrates its 16th anniversary this week (official birthday is: August 16, 1993). It sure has been an interesting ride.

Red Hat Names 2009 Red Hat Certified Engineers of the Year

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Linux

businesswire.com (PR): Red Hat, Inc. today announced the five regional winners of its annual Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) of the Year contest.

PCLinuxOS LXDE (PCLXDE) 2009 Review

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PCLOS

greentechgirl.com: Fortunately, the PCLOS community has come out with a new flavor based on the LXDE desktop, so I can stop worrying about a forced KDE 4 upgrade. I opted for the LXDE install. I’d never tried it, much less heard of it, but the screenshots looked nice enough.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • A Beginner’s Guide To Migrating from GNOME to KDE in Ubuntu

  • Installing ‘Murrine’ GTK2 Engine on OpenSuSE
  • What is this Linux thingy and why should I care?
  • Writing UDEV rules to get a SCSI scanner working on Ubuntu
  • Opera on GNU/Linux - Moving an Account Reveals a Problem
  • Edit your GNOME menus
  • Choosing the Right Open Source Technology
  • Getting started with developing on the Palm Pre
  • Install Hundreds of Free Fonts In Ubuntu via Repositories
  • Speed Up Auto-hide On Gnome Panels
  • Dell Switches to Ubuntu Netbook Remix, Looks Into Smartbooks
  • SYSSTAT : comprising tools that offers advanced system performance monitoring
  • Amarok 2: Universal Mass Storage Device Support Here
  • Hard Disk Sentinel Linux Review
  • Samba: Allow Domain Controllers Create Machine Trust Accounts On-the-Fly
  • GNU Toolchain Update, August 2009
  • The Computer Action Show - Season 1 Episode 1

The beauty, the function: Ubuntu netbook launcher on Mandriva

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Software

wobo46.wordpress: Yesterday German users from MandrivaUser.de began working on the netbook-launcher – the desktop which made the beauty of the Ubuntu Netbook Remix.

Recycling Lives and Computers

Filed under
Ubuntu

wsav.com: Nowadays, if you can’t log on you may feel a little left out. Just ask Barbara Sheppard and her daughter, Christina. They know how difficult life can be without a computer. Now, Barbara and her daughter have access to e-mail and the internet at home, and it’s all because of All Walks Of Life, Inc. and it’s IT program, “The Goon Squad”.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #155

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Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #155 for the week August 9th - August 15th, 2009 is available.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME

  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME
    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME. It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history. I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.
  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System
    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters. Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.
  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10
    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.
  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?
    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]