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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Closes Numerous OpenSSH Vulnerabilities in Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:32pm
Story A User’s Eye View of Bodhi 3.1.0 & Moksha Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:29pm
Story The Future of Developing Firefox Add-ons Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:22pm
Story Samsung rumored to be working on 18.4-inch Android tablet Rianne Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 7:15pm
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:59pm
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 12:02pm
Story The dummy’s guide to a first-time Linux install (it’s easier than you think) Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 10:07am
Story Now your Raspberry Pi can water your lawn Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:49am
Story FCC Boosting Open Video Platform for Disabled Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:28am
Story LibreOffice 5.0: The strongest release to date Roy Schestowitz 21/08/2015 - 9:10am

Look out Ubuntu, look out Arch:

Filed under
Linux
  • Look out Ubuntu, look out Arch: Linux Mint Debian
  • Linux Mint Debian installation screenshots

Rebuttal to "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You."

Filed under
OOo

acrossad.org: I recently read the article "Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You" by Mr. Serdar Yegulalp with great interest. OpenOffice.org has been of particular interest to me of late due to the recent controversy surrounding Oracle's Google lawsuit.

Diaspora puts out Developer Release

Filed under
Software
  • Diaspora puts out Developer Release -- source code is here!
  • Facebook Competitor Diaspora Revealed: Sparse, But Clean
  • Diaspora review – first experiences
  • Live from New York, it's finally Diaspora night! (Sort of.)
  • Facebook alternative Diaspora rolls out first code
  • A Brief Look at What Diaspora Will Do
  • Diaspora fail

Red Hat To Acquire Novell?

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

benzinga.com: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) was named by the Wall Street Journal yesterday to be one of the potential purchasers of Novell, which the New York Post announced would sell itself in two parts;

Firefox 3.6.10 and 3.5.13 updates now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: Firefox 3.6.10 and 3.5.13 are now available as free downloads for Windows, Mac, and Linux from www.firefox.com. As always, we recommend that users keep up to date with the latest stability and support versions of Firefox.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Maverick Meerkat Review + Screenshots Tour
  • Power Management Patches For Nouveau, Finally
  • OpenIndiana project first screenshots
  • Phishing warning: ubuntu-help.com
  • Opera, The Fastest Proven Browser
  • UK Government 'committed' to open source
  • Matthew Garrett: Thoughts on upstreams
  • FreeBSD’s SoC Summer Highlights
  • New Way To Get The New Official Ubuntu Font Family
  • The Novell news is not news
  • Fundamental Round Gnome Theme 2.1 Adds 6 Color Schemes
  • Cisco doesn't contribute nearly enough to open source
  • MeeGo a no-show at NokiaWorld
  • BEAST - Your Solution for Music Composition and Synthesis
  • DtO: Sorry you asked.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • XBMC – Get Shoutcast Working
  • Dual Boot Windows 7 and Fedora 13
  • VMWare ESXi 4: How to Add Virtual Hard Disk
  • Finding IP addresses of devices in your network using port scan
  • Easily share files on LAN with fellow Ubuntu users with Giver
  • Iat Converts many CD-ROM image to ISO9660
  • Unix How-To: Counting Anything
  • How to make Photographs Vintage in GIMP
  • Script To Notify You When Someone Logs In
  • Exploring /dev/random vs. /dev/urandom and /dev/zero vs. /dev/null
  • How to use ‘locate’ to find files in Linux?

Vincent Untz: Explaining GNOME 3

Filed under
Software
Interviews

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Conference 2010 Sneak Peaks will introduce some speakers and talks to you. Today we feature the talk “Explaining GNOME 3″ from Vincent Untz.

A Primer on HTML5 <Video> and Why You Should Care About It

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: There is good news: the “open Web”, a vision for the future of the Internet that is participatory, collaborative and free from vendor lock-in is finally coming to fruition.

rekonq: KDE's Webkit Browser Continues To Come Of Age

Filed under
Software

thebluemint.net: As many of you no doubt know, and a few might not, rekonq is KDE's Webkit-based browser. Under heavy development for a while now, we can see this super-fast browser coming of age in a hurry.

Adobe Warns Of Flash Bug, Testing new 64-Bit

Filed under
Software
  • Adobe Warns Of Flash Player Zero-Day Bug
  • Adobe begins 64-bit Flash Player test

Linux Applications With Peculiar Names

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: I'm sure most of us were put before in the situation of discovering a new great application, but had to stop and try to figure out how to actually read and spell its name letter by letter.

Debian Updates, Code Names, Back Ports, Screenshots, and Derived

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Things have been anything but quiet on the Debian front lately. Between updating 5.0, naming 7.0, and officially approving backports this has been a busy week for Debian.

Testing Gnash 0.8.8 On Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Late last month, the GNU Gnash project released version 0.8.8 of its open-source flash player, which touts much better compatibility than its predecessors with popular Flash-centric sites, like YouTube. But how well does Gnash 0.8.8 actually work on Ubuntu?

Audacity Delivers Bold Sound Editing Tools

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: Audacity is no mere virtual jukebox. Sure, it'll play music, but what it's really there for is editing audio files -- everything from MP3s you may have in your collection to recordings you make yourself.

Choice is Messy (Free Software Likes It That Way)

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Does free software offer too many choices? In the last dozen years, the question has been revived more often than the Daleks on Doctor Who.

5 Reasons Disgruntled Windows User Should Use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

makeuseof.com: Since I decided to dual-boot my main laptop with Ubuntu, I’ve found myself spending considerably longer in a Linux environment than a Microsoft one. I’m going to try and demonstrate some of my favourite things about the operating system.

Interview with Aaron Seigo

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

ubuntuusers.de: KDE 4.5 has been released some weeks ago. We take this occasion to interview Aaron Seigo (aseigo).

Another way for Freedom

Filed under
OSS

novell.com/prblogs: This past weekend the New York Times ran a story on how the Russian government has used software licensing to squelch dissent protests and prevent environmentalists and other activists from organizing.

A Future So Bright

Filed under
Linux

itworld.com: There's been a good deal of discussion about my last post about why Linux shouldn't be trying to win. That's gratifying, because discussion like that leads to a reassessment of the overall goals of Linux and other free and open source software (FOSS) projects.

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More in Tux Machines

Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone - With Android

I ever so slightly regret the "upgrade" to Android. With a version less than the tablet, the UI changes are extremely noticeable, and the transition isn't as smooth. The device lags, and it just doesn't have enough processing power to give the necessary feel of goodness and elegance. On the other hand, you get tons of native applications that you can actually use, as opposed to the Ubuntu Touch idea. Shame really. For 'tis a compromise. If you ask me, I wholeheartedly embrace the M10 tablet upgrade, but on the phone, you might as well keep Ubuntu unless you need the device for serious use. If it's just an opportunistic call/SMS thing for when abroad and such, or to loan to friends, the original combo is adequate. If you need apps, then Android is the way to go, but do not except any miracles. It won't be speedy, and it won't be too pretty. All in all, an okay player. It is silly attaching sentiments to software or hardware, but I do guess I will fondly remember the Ubuntu phone attempt as a noble idea to make something great and fun. I could have kept the device in its original state, perhaps, but in the end, it would have ended in a pile of ancient stuff you keep around for a decade until you decide you need to throw it away to leave room for fresh memories and less ancient stuff. Having a flawless Android experience would have helped soften the edge, but as it is, it remains the bittersweet attempt at what could have been a revolution. The end. Read more Also: Ubuntu Desktop weekly update – February 23, 2018

​Docker and Red Hat News

  • ​Docker has a business plan headache
    We love containers. And, for most of us, containers means Docker. As RightScale observed in its RightScale 2018 State of the Cloud report, Docker's adoption by the industry has increased to 49 percent from 35 percent in 2017.
  • Mycroft Widget, Atos and Red Hat's New Cloud Container Solution, npm Bug and More
    Atos and Red Hat announced this morning "a new fully-managed cloud container solution - Atos Managed OpenShift (AMOS) - built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform". The press release adds, "Because AMOS is built on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a container-centric hybrid cloud solution, it can deliver the flexibility customers seek from cloud-native and container-based applications."
  • Red Hat Decision Manager 7 Boosts BPM with Low-Code Approach
    Red Hat is perhaps best known for its Enterprise Linux platform, but it has been a player in the Business Process Management (BPM) suite for over a decade too. On Feb. 21, Red Hat Decision Manager 7 was officially announced as the successor to the company's JBoss Business Rules Management System (BRMS) product. Red Hat first released BRMS back in May 2009 which itself was an evolution of the JBoss Rules Engine.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Active Stock Evaluation

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.