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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 23 Beta 10 Released for Linux srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 8:05pm
Story Ubuntu Forums are back up and a post mortem srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 8:01pm
Story The Waylanders are coming srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 7:58pm
Story 10 innovations that can save money for small businesses srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 5:25pm
Story IBM’s New Linux Box Combines the Best of Watson + Open Source srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 5:23pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 3:33pm
Story Linux 3.11 Kernel Power Use & stuff srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 5:20am
Story Switching the Plasma shells srlinuxx 30/07/2013 - 5:10am
Story As Linux stalks Windows poor countries will benefit srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 10:47pm
Story A Second Helping of Pi srlinuxx 29/07/2013 - 10:45pm

OStatic's Firefox Superguide

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com: Since the inception of OStatic, we've tried to do lots of tutorials and tips posts on Firefox, and recently a reader wrote in and said it would be useful to have them all compiled in one superguide. So here you go--our superguide to working more efficiently with Firefox.

FSF works with Los Alamos Computers to provide free computers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Finding hardware that works with GNU/Linux is hard enough. But if you also want a completely free system -- one that requires no proprietary drivers or firmware to run -- then the task is almost impossible. To fill this gap, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has been developing its own hardware list, and, as the next logical step, has been working with Los Alamos Computers (LAC) to develop a line of free (as in speech) computers pre-installed with GNU/Linux.

A Muslim, a Christian, and an Atheist's View on Linux and more...

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: A few months ago, I wrote a review of Ubuntu Muslim Edition. --I gave it positive remarks as it is truly deserving to be praised. However, some readers have an issue with the Muslim Edition of Ubuntu and Linux in general that fueled a heated discussion. And since religion is involved, it started a never ending debate.

The 2.6.27 merge window closes

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: On July 28, Linus Torvalds released the 2.6.27-rc1 prepatch and closed the merge window for 2.6.27. That means we now know what will be in this kernel, which will probably be released sometime in October. Recent cycles have featured a lot of internal cleanup and relatively few new features, but 2.6.27 will reverse that trend somewhat. Linux users will see a lot of new things here.

Ubuntu's GNOME Nautilus

Filed under
Software

computingtech.blogspot: Nautilus is the Swiss Army knife of the GNOME world. Nautilus is a file manager that helps you to graphically use and manage files, folders, and other resources found on your computer. Nautilus is developed as part of the GNOME project. Linux directories are the same as Windows folders.

Pardus 2008 Review

Filed under
Linux

fosswire.com: After giving this distro a few days of use, one word comes to mind: “polished.” Pardus 2008 is a Linux distribution created by the Turkish National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptology. At its core, it is a Turkish language OS, but the English version shows no lack of attention.

5 tips for better browsing

Filed under
HowTos

networkworld.com: Whether you're trying to keep track of a zillion tabs, navigate your bookmarks, or deal with a page that just won't load, the more you use your Web browser, the more likely you are to run into problems. But with the help of hidden features and third-party add-ons, you can tackle these troubles and squeeze even more efficiency out of Apple's Safari 3 and Mozilla's Firefox 2 and 3.

openSUSE KDE 4.1 LiveCDs released

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

opensuse.org: The KDE team today released KDE 4.1. Regular KDE 4 Packages and an openSUSE-based KDE Four Live CD have been available throughout the whole cycle, and final versions of them are also available now.

Linux mainstream? Not enough software!

Filed under
Linux

net76.net/blog: Lots of different companies are investing and promoting linux. Dell, Asus, Intel, Apple, are just a few to mention who have poured lots of money into the development and adoption of linux. Despite their best efforts, linux is still not adopted over OSX and Windows by professionals and average users. Why? Despite all the companies promoting the development of linux, not enough have joined the band wagon.

Is Money Useless to Open Source Projects?

Filed under
OSS

codinghorror.com/blog: In April I donated $5,000 of the ad revenue from this website to an open source .NET project. I was crushingly disappointed to find out the $5,000 in grant money has been sitting in the bank for the last four months, totally unused.

KDE 4.1- a KDE that suits you?

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: With KDE 4.1 final out soon many users again ask themselves if it is the right KDE version for them. While many features missing in KDE 4.0 are now available, the KDE project published a paper to help the users with the decision.

Should We Fear the (Microsoft) Geeks, Bearing Gifts?

Filed under
Microsoft

Glyn Moody: One of the most interesting journeys being undertaken at the moment in computing is that of Microsoft towards open source. Let's look at [each step] in turn.

Jack Keane shipping for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: Just drop a secret agent off on a mysterious island? Sounds good, thought Jack. After all, no-one said anything about fighting a mad scientist and other horrifying dangers! Just Jack’s bad luck when his ship shatters on that mysterious island’s cliffs, ushering in a sudden turn of fate...

Interview with Opera CTO Håkon Wium Lie

Filed under
Interviews

linuxjournal.com: Products Editor James Gray recently sat down for a virtual gab fest with Håkon Wium Lie Chief Technology Officer of Opera. They discussed Opera 9.5, Opera's history, why Linux users should choose Opera and much more.

Firefox 3.1 Alpha 1 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: The first developer milestone of the next release of Firefox - code named Shiretoko Alpha 1 - is now available for download. Shiretoko is built on pre-release version of the Gecko 1.9.1 platform, which forms the core of rich internet applications such as Firefox. Please note that this release is intended for developers and testers only.

KDE 4.1 rocks the desktop

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: KDE 4.1 was finally released to the public today. After all the controversy since the release of KDE 4.0, I'm happy to announce that KDE 4.1 simply rocks.

KDE 4.1 Review: The Rocky Road of the New KDE

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: With its 4.1 release, KDE is taking few chances. While the 4.0 release's announcement emphasized excitement and significance, the tone of the announcement for 4.1 is more subdued. This time, the announcement talks about maturing technologies and underlying improvements, and the only claim is that the 4.1 desktop "can replace the KDE 3 shell for most casual users."

KDE 4.1 release ups free desktop ante

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: After six months of development since the release of the much publicized 4.0, the KDE project has unveiled version 4.1 which includes many new bug fixes and feature enhancements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Survey: Economy Pushing Users to Open Source

  • Open-source sales growing despite economy
  • What has Grandma go to do with it?
  • 10 things you didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu
  • 5 things you didn’t know about linux kernel code metrics
  • Desktop Drapes: Another GNOME Wallpaper Changer
  • How to install Launchy on Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)
  • How to speed up booting into GNOME
  • nUbuntu Development Kicking Off Again - Security LiveCD
  • The Geekiest Nighthmare
  • Rwanda: 5,000 Laptops for Students Arrive
  • Dear Mr. Shuttleworth
  • Stable kernel 2.6.25.13 Released
  • Dual Boot Ubuntu with Windows Vista/XP
  • LiMo kills Linux smartphone
  • Foxconn says ACPI issues are AMI’s fault
  • OLS 2008 wrap-up
  • Xataface lets non-technical users edit MySQL data
  • Recent customer wins for open source
  • Using Sysctl To Change Kernel Tunables On Linux
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 07/25

No! Wha…oooh…wow. Yes!

Filed under
Linux

ubuntuproductivity.com: Using linux feels a lot like listening to an undiscovered band; it’s the new band none of my friends have listened to. When they first experience it they want it. I have it. I feel special. You know the story…

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More in Tux Machines

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.