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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Foundation Joins the GNOME Advisory Board srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 11:37pm
Story KDE – the Prism Breaker srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 11:35pm
Story Why it is worth to build open source software srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 7:57pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 4:35pm
Story Is Red Hat Destined for Greatness? srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 4:51am
Story FreeBSD Can Compete With Ubuntu Linux, Windows 8 srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 4:48am
Story OpenMandriva Beta Postponed, YaST Gone Ruby srlinuxx 01/08/2013 - 4:47am
Story Is the Ubuntu Edge phone doomed? srlinuxx 31/07/2013 - 10:11pm
Story A year of Linux desktop at Westcliff High School srlinuxx 31/07/2013 - 10:09pm
Story Korora Linux: More Than Just Another Fedora Clone srlinuxx 31/07/2013 - 10:07pm

Kernel space: no shortage of tracing options

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Three weeks ago, LWN looked at the renewed interest in dynamic tracing, with an emphasis on SystemTap. Tracing is a perennial presence on end-user wishlists; it remains a handy tool for companies like Sun Microsystems, which wish to show that their offerings (Solaris, for example) are superior to Linux. It is not surprising that there is a lot of interest in tracing implementations for Linux.

Also: 2.6.27-rc1, "Pretty Dang Busy"

some images:

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux T-Shirt Statistics Graph

  • Longest Error Ever
  • Mozilla Community
  • The Mozilla Tree

KDE 4.1 still isn't for me

Filed under
KDE

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: A new version of one of the two major Linux desktops, KDE and GNOME, came out today: KDE 4.1 While I don't hate it, I don't see myself switching over from KDE 3.5.9 either. That said, I will say KDE 4.1 is an improvement over the last 4.x version.

ASUS Eee PC 1000 (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: ASUS’ response to the heap of competitors entering the mini-notebook space it helped create has been a bit overwhelming; the company has just released its fifth Eee PC model in two months. But though it is increasingly difficult to pick from the seemingly interminable Eee PCs on the market, the Eee PC 1000 has risen to be one of our favorites.

What’s next in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (part 1)

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: One of the most-asked questions in the software world is:
“What’s coming in the next release?” Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® is no different. You can wait for the beta, and pore over the release notes and the package changelogs. You can corner a product manager at the right moment. But the easiest and best way to get the scoop on what’s coming up in future Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases? Take a look at Fedora.

Hardy is a hard time...

Filed under
Ubuntu

frimouvy.org: I'm tired of Hardy. Tired of the bugs, tired of this Operating System. Yes, for the first time, I really regret to use Ubuntu.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 1 released

Filed under
News
MDV

Mandriva is proud to announce the release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 1 'thornicrofti'. This beta includes the newest release of KDE 4, KDE 4.1 final, GNOME 2.23.5, Firefox 3, and kernel 2.6.26 final.

Foxconn owns up to dodgy BIOS crippling Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.zdnet: Well, as it turns out the problem isn’t a Foxconn one but it’s down to American Megatrends (AMI) having shipped a defective BIOS. Also, as it turns out, other boards are also affected.

SplashTop "Instant-On Linux" Gets Hacked

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last October we were the first to deliver a full-review of DeviceVM's SplashTop which was an instant-on embedded Linux distribution at the time found on a lone ASUS motherboard. Since then there has been a commitment to SplashTop on all ASUS motherboards and even on ASUS notebooks.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting Up Chkrootkit to Automatically Scan for Rootkits Daily

  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 8
  • KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) on Ubuntu 8.04.1 Desktop
  • How to install & configure Google Desktop Gadgets in openSUSE
  • How to Install KDE 4.1 on Ubuntu 8.04

OStatic's Firefox Superguide

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com: Since the inception of OStatic, we've tried to do lots of tutorials and tips posts on Firefox, and recently a reader wrote in and said it would be useful to have them all compiled in one superguide. So here you go--our superguide to working more efficiently with Firefox.

FSF works with Los Alamos Computers to provide free computers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Finding hardware that works with GNU/Linux is hard enough. But if you also want a completely free system -- one that requires no proprietary drivers or firmware to run -- then the task is almost impossible. To fill this gap, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has been developing its own hardware list, and, as the next logical step, has been working with Los Alamos Computers (LAC) to develop a line of free (as in speech) computers pre-installed with GNU/Linux.

A Muslim, a Christian, and an Atheist's View on Linux and more...

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: A few months ago, I wrote a review of Ubuntu Muslim Edition. --I gave it positive remarks as it is truly deserving to be praised. However, some readers have an issue with the Muslim Edition of Ubuntu and Linux in general that fueled a heated discussion. And since religion is involved, it started a never ending debate.

The 2.6.27 merge window closes

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: On July 28, Linus Torvalds released the 2.6.27-rc1 prepatch and closed the merge window for 2.6.27. That means we now know what will be in this kernel, which will probably be released sometime in October. Recent cycles have featured a lot of internal cleanup and relatively few new features, but 2.6.27 will reverse that trend somewhat. Linux users will see a lot of new things here.

Ubuntu's GNOME Nautilus

Filed under
Software

computingtech.blogspot: Nautilus is the Swiss Army knife of the GNOME world. Nautilus is a file manager that helps you to graphically use and manage files, folders, and other resources found on your computer. Nautilus is developed as part of the GNOME project. Linux directories are the same as Windows folders.

Pardus 2008 Review

Filed under
Linux

fosswire.com: After giving this distro a few days of use, one word comes to mind: “polished.” Pardus 2008 is a Linux distribution created by the Turkish National Research Institute of Electronics and Cryptology. At its core, it is a Turkish language OS, but the English version shows no lack of attention.

5 tips for better browsing

Filed under
HowTos

networkworld.com: Whether you're trying to keep track of a zillion tabs, navigate your bookmarks, or deal with a page that just won't load, the more you use your Web browser, the more likely you are to run into problems. But with the help of hidden features and third-party add-ons, you can tackle these troubles and squeeze even more efficiency out of Apple's Safari 3 and Mozilla's Firefox 2 and 3.

openSUSE KDE 4.1 LiveCDs released

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

opensuse.org: The KDE team today released KDE 4.1. Regular KDE 4 Packages and an openSUSE-based KDE Four Live CD have been available throughout the whole cycle, and final versions of them are also available now.

Linux mainstream? Not enough software!

Filed under
Linux

net76.net/blog: Lots of different companies are investing and promoting linux. Dell, Asus, Intel, Apple, are just a few to mention who have poured lots of money into the development and adoption of linux. Despite their best efforts, linux is still not adopted over OSX and Windows by professionals and average users. Why? Despite all the companies promoting the development of linux, not enough have joined the band wagon.

Is Money Useless to Open Source Projects?

Filed under
OSS

codinghorror.com/blog: In April I donated $5,000 of the ad revenue from this website to an open source .NET project. I was crushingly disappointed to find out the $5,000 in grant money has been sitting in the bank for the last four months, totally unused.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Please save GMane!
  • The End of Gmane?
    In 2002, I grew annoyed with not finding the obscure technical information I was looking for, so I started Gmane, the mailing list archive. All technical discussion took place on mailing lists those days, and archiving those were, at best, spotty and with horrible web interfaces. The past few weeks, the Gmane machines (and more importantly, the company I work for, who are graciously hosting the servers) have been the target of a number of distributed denial of service attacks. Our upstream have been good about helping us filter out the DDoS traffic, but it’s meant serious downtime where we’ve been completely off the Internet.
  • Pwnie Express makes IoT, Android security arsenal open source
    Pwnie Express has given the keys to software used to secure the Internet of Things (IoT) and Android software to the open-source community. The Internet of Things (IoT), the emergence of devices ranging from lighting to fridges and embedded systems which are connected to the web, has paved an avenue for cyberattackers to exploit.
  • The Software Supply Chain Is Bedeviled by Bad Open-Source Code [Ed: again, trace this back to FUD firms like Sonatype in this case]
    Open-source components play a key role in the software supply chain. By reducing the amount of code that development organizations need to write, open source enables companies to deliver software more efficiently — but not without significant risks, including defective and outdated components and security vulnerabilities.
  • Securing a Virtual World [Ed: paywall, undated (no year but reposted)]
  • Google tells Android's Linux kernel to toughen up and fight off those horrible hacker bullies
    In a blog post, Jeff Vander Stoep of the mobile operating system's security team said that in the next build of the OS, named Nougat, Google is going to be addressing two key areas of the Linux kernel that reside at the heart of most of the world's smartphones: memory protection and reducing areas available for attack by hackers.

today's howtos

Chew on this: Ubuntu Core Linux comes to the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board

Linux and other open source software have been in the news quite a bit lately. As more and more people are seeing, closed source is not the only way to make money. A company like Red Hat, for instance, is able to be profitable while focusing its business on open source. Ubuntu is one of the most popular Linux-based operating systems, and it is not hard to see why. Not only is it easy to use and adaptable to much hardware (such as SoC boards), but there is a ton of free support online from the Ubuntu user community too. Today, Canonical announces a special Ubuntu Core image for the uCRobotics Bubblegum-96 board. Read more