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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.13-rc4 Kernel Released, But It's Too Big Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 9:33pm
Story Lenovo X201 Support Comes To Coreboot Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 9:14pm
Story Running The SteamOS Kernel On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 8:58pm
Story The First NVIDIA GeForce Benchmarks On The SteamOS Beta Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 1:36pm
Story CentOS 6.5 Review – Red Hat for all Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 1:22pm
Story Dell also joins the Chrome OS bandwagon launches Chromebook 11 Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 12:28pm
Story Google tells EFF: Android 4.3's privacy tool was a MISTAKE, we've yanked it Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 12:19pm
Story The Steam Controller Works "Out Of The Box" On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 12:15pm
Story Slideshow: 10 Linux-Based Robots by Land, Air, And Sea Rianne Schestowitz 15/12/2013 - 12:23am
Story MintBox 2 review: Linux Mint in a compact, powerful computer Rianne Schestowitz 14/12/2013 - 9:57pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to build a local IMAP server

  • Structure of a PAM Configuration File
  • Simple Hello World Application in Gambas
  • Restoring iptables Automatically On Boot
  • HowTo do Ethernet Bonding on Ubuntu
  • Kernel tuning with sysctl
  • How to setup an intranet with free open source software
  • Quit tailing me
  • How To: Stop DHCP from updating /etc/resolv.conf
  • exim and domainkeys on debian
  • Follow the diagrams to install openSUSE 11

What is So Great About Linux

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot.com: The simple commitment to share code is probably the single most powerful contributor to the growth of the open source software movement in general, and Linux in particular. The willingness of Linus to incorporate code from others in the Linux kernel has also been critical to the success of Linux. The following sections characterize Linux and the communities.

9 useful Linux commands everyone should use

Filed under
Linux

blogs.howtogeek.com: Just switched from Windows and still a bit scared about the command line? You shouldn't be! The command line is a very powerful, fast and intuitive tool to get things done without clicking buttons and navigating through windows.

Switching From Windows To Linux In 3 Easy Steps

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: In my ongoing quest to take over the world with Linux as my OS of choice, I've noticed that simply handing someone an install CD doesn't really do the trick. The problem is that hating Windows isn't enough. Most people hate Windows, but feel trapped into using it. That's where my 3 step approach comes in.

What Xandros Has Up Its Sleeve

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Custom Linux provider Xandros will release a free Linux OS called "Freespire 5" during the fourth quarter of 2008. This next version of Freespire will be based on the Debian GNU/Linux "Lenny" release rather than the Ubuntu Linux platform Freespire 4 uses.

Source for the goose should be source for the gander

Filed under
OSS

ft.com: Jamie Boyle’s sensible defence of open-source software starts in a disarming way, by suggesting that the Federal Circuit’s decision in Jacobsen v Katzer, which upheld the validity of an open-source copyright claim, was one of those dry-as-dust decisions that only intellectual property geeks could love.

Top 200 Tech Blogs: the Datamation List

Filed under
Web

earthweb.com: The universe of tech blogs is solar system-sized and getting bigger all the time. Part of what makes it so vast is an inescapable fact: people interested in technology spend inordinate time with computers, so naturally a Web-based medium is wildly popular. So the question becomes more difficult every year: Which of the gazillion tech blogs are worth your time?

40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista!

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Challenged by my iTWire colleague and Linux lover Sam Varghese to come up with 40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista, I’ve done just that.

Tint2 + Trayer

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: In my last screenshot-post I was still using LXpanel. It’s just that it looks a bit boring…even with transparency turned on. Enter: tint2.

Survey Says: Ubuntu Server Gaining Momentum

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Conventional wisdom says Ubuntu’s popularity is limited to desktop PCs and laptops. However, a reader survey by Works With U reveals that nearly 80 percent of organizations running Ubuntu depend on at least one production Ubuntu server. Here’s the scoop.

Five Useful Extensions for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux-magazine.com: Want to expand OpenOffice.org's default functionality? The official extension repository has quite a few extensions you can use to add some nifty features to the productivity suite. Precisely which extensions you might find useful depends, of course, on your particular needs, but there are at least five extensions that deserve a closer look no matter how you use OpenOffice.org.

Google pledges 9 month anonymity on data

Filed under
Google

techradar.com: Google has responded to mounting EU pressure on privacy by stating it will 'anonymize' users' IP addresses after nine months.

When Will They Ever Learn?

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: Here's some news from Red Hat: We’ve partnered with Seneca College, one of the leaders in instituting open source software into its coursework, to bring Fedora to the classroom. What's remarkable about this is that Red Hat considers it remarkable. And, sadly, it *is* remarkable.

Ubuntu In Popular Culture

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniel.holba.ch/blog: Yesterday we watched “Berlin am Meer” - not a world-changing, but nice movie which plays in Berlin. I was pleased to see they used Ubuntu in a short scene.

Polishing Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: In an effort to increase the level of Firefox’s visual and interactive polish, I’ll be posting a list of around 7 bugs every monday from now until we finish up Firefox 3.1.

Don't be Afraid of Linux

Filed under
Linux

shoutwire.com: When it comes to dual-booting Linux and Windows, your average computer user will shit himself six ways from Sunday and refuse because he doesn't want to have to learn anything new. Most people are just too damn intimidated by all the geek rhetoric they hear online and honestly just don't want to screw up their machine.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu is really boring me on my desktop

  • Fully Automatic Installation for all distributions
  • More fun X-based stuff
  • Gambas - Almost Visual Basic for Linux
  • Lego-like Linux modules ready to ship
  • Interactive C# Shell
  • A Flurry of Open Source Video-Related News
  • The all new Ubuntu Brainstorm
  • openSUSE Build Service Build Checks
  • Microsoft, Novell Making Virtualization Moves At VMworld
  • No tiling support for KDE 4.2
  • Bill and Jerry, Chrome and the Next Linux Generation
  • Ad danger to open source
  • How pot may win the war against super-bacteria

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Swear Words

  • Visualizing open source software
  • Linux Outlaws 53 - Duck Porn?!

Review: Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One

  • OLPC's Amazon Notebook Linux Only
  • ASUS Eee PC 901 falls to a cool $500
  • Bootleg videos to blame for Linux MSI Wind delay?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org: Knowing when to use Impress

  • Improve login time by using readahead in Ubuntu
  • Linux Wi-Fi Works With wicd
  • Use Amarok as An Alarm Clock
  • Configuring IceWM: Basics
  • Linux Performance Hunting Tips - Take Copious Notes (Save Everything)
  • Avoid OpenDNS Free DNS Service Like The Plague
  • Tip: USB key problem on Mandriva
  • DIY File Server
  • Finding Overlapping Matches Using Perl's Lookahead Assertion Matching
  • small Qt based mail biff
  • Expanding text with Snippits in Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • OpenSSL 1.1.0 Series Release Notes
  • Linux.PNScan Malware Brute-Forces Linux-Based Routers
  • St. Jude stock shorted on heart device hacking fears; shares drop
    The stock of pacemaker manufacturer St. Jude Medical Inc (STJ.N) fell sharply on Thursday after short-selling firm Muddy Waters said it had placed a bet that the shares would fall, claiming its implanted heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attacks. St. Jude, which agreed in April to sell itself for $25 billion to Abbott Laboratories (ABT.N), said the allegations were false. St Jude shares closed down 4.96 percent, the biggest one-day fall in 7 months and at a 7.4 percent discount to Abbott's takeover offer. Muddy Waters head Carson Block said the firm's position was motivated by research from a cyber security firm, MedSec Holdings Inc, which has a financial arrangement with Muddy Waters. MedSec asserted that St. Jude's heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attack and were a risk to patients.
  • BlackArch Linux ISO now comes with over 1,500 hacking tools
    On a move to counter distros like Kali Linux and BackBox, BlackArch has got a new ISO image that includes more than 1,500 hacking tools. The update also brings several security and software tweaks to deliver an enhanced platform for various penetration testing and security assessment activities. The new BlackArch Linux ISO includes an all new Linux installer and more than 100 new penetration testing and hacking tools. There is also Linux 4.7.1 to fix the bugs and compatibility issues of the previous kernel. Additionally, the BlackArch team has updated all its in-house tools and system packages as well as updated menu entries for the Openbox, Fluxbox and Awesome windows managers.

Server Administration

  • Big Blue Aims For The Sky With Power9
    Intel has the kind of control in the datacenter that only one vendor in the history of data processing has ever enjoyed. That other company is, of course, IBM, and Big Blue wants to take back some of the real estate it lost in the datacenters of the world in the past twenty years. The Power9 chip, unveiled at the Hot Chips conference this week, is the best chance the company has had to make some share gains against X86 processors since the Power4 chip came out a decade and a half ago and set IBM on the path to dominance in the RISC/Unix market. IBM laid out a roadmap out past 2020 for its Power family of processors back at the OpenPower Summit in early April, demonstrating its commitment the CPU market with chips that are offer a brawny alternative to CPUs and accelerators compared to the Xeon and Xeon Phi alternatives from Intel and the relatively less brawny chips from ARM server chip makers such as Applied Micro and Cavium and the expected products from AMD, Broadcom, and Qualcomm. We pondered IBM’s prospects in the datacenter in the wake of some details coming out about next year’s Power9 processors, which IBM said at the time would come in two flavors, one aimed at scale-out machines with one or two sockets and another aimed at scale up machines with NUMA architectures and lots of sockets and shared memory.
  • ARM Announces ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions: Aiming for HPC and Data Center
    Today ARM is announcing an update to their line of architecture license products. With the goal of moving ARM more into the server, the data center, and high-performance computing, the new license add-on tackles a fundamental data center and HPC issue: vector compute. ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions won’t be part of any ARM microarchitecture license today, but for the semiconductor companies that build their own cores with the instruction set, this could see ARM move up into the HPC markets. Fujitsu is the first public licensee on board, with plans to include ARM v8-A cores with SVE in the Post-K RIKEN supercomputer in 2020.
  • The Sad State of Docker
    I have always been a big fan of Docker. This is very visible if you regularly read this blog. However, I am very disappointed lately how Docker handled the 1.12 release. I like to think of version 1.12 as a great proof of concept that should not have received the amount of attention that it already received. Let’s dive deep into what I found wrong. First, I do not think a company should market and promote exciting new features that have not been tested well. Every time Docker makes an announcement, the news spreads like a virus to blogs and news sites all over the globe. Tech blogs will basically copy and paste the exact same procedure that Docker discussed into a new blog post as if they were creating original content. This cycle repeats over and over again and becomes annoying because I am seeing the same story a million times. What I hate most about these recent redundant articles is that the features do not work as well as what is written about them.
  • Containers debunked: DevOps, security and why containers will not replace virtual machines
    The tech industry is full of exciting trends that promise to change the face of the industry and business as we know it, but one that is gaining a huge amount of focus is containers. However, problems lie with the technology and threaten to root itself deep in the mythology about it, namely the misconceptions over what the technology is, what can be done with it, and the idea that they replace virtual machines. Lars Herrmann, GM, Integrated Solutions at Red Hat spoke to CBR about five common misconceptions, but first the benefits. Herrmann, said: “Containerisation can be an amazingly efficient way to do DevOps, so it’s a very practical way to get into a DevOps methodology and process inside an organisation, which is highly required in a lot of organisations because of the benefits in agility to be able to release software faster, better, and deliver more value.”
  • Rackspace Going Private after $4.3 Billion Buyout
    The company released Rackspace Private Cloud powered by Red Hat in February. Using the Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the product helped extend Rackspace's OpenStack-as-a-service product slate.
  • SoylentNews' Folding@Home Team is Now in the Top 500 in the World
    It has only been six short months since SoylentNews' Folding@Home team was founded, and we've made a major milestone: our team is now one of the top 500 teams in the world! We've already surpassed some heavy hitters like /. and several universities, including MIT. (But now is not the time to rest on our laurels. A certain Redmond-based software producer currently occupies #442.) In case you aren't familiar with folding@home, it's a distributed computing project that simulates protein folding in an attempt to better understand diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's and thereby help to find a cure. To that end, SoylentNews' team has completed nearly 16,000 work units.

Games for GNU/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • SDDM 0.14.0
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” Beta 1
  • Top 10 Time Tracking Software for Linux
    Just a few days ago we were presenting software for one of the most popular mainstream Linux distribution – Ubuntu. Now let’s cover the progenitor of all free and open-source software. Its operating system was released on October 5, 1991. The creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was only 22 years old at that time! Linux is not very popular on the desktop computers (at least among regular users, software engineers, for example, prefer to work on it), but it is the leading operating system on servers, mainframe computers, and virtually all fastest supercomputers. It is also worth mentioning that without Linux there won’t be no Android as we know it now, no network routers, video game consoles, and smartwatches. We really owe a lot to Mr. Linus. According to Wikipedia, the development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open-source software collaboration. Its source code may be used, modified and distributed—commercially or non-commercially—by anyone under the terms of its respective licenses. Thanks to it we can use some great software like the already mentioned Ubuntu, but also Fedora, Gentoo Linux, Debian and more.
  • MPTCP v0.91 Release
    The MPTCP v0.91 release is based on the Linux Kernel Longterm Support release v4.1.x.
  • Quick Updates: Guake 0.8.7, WebTorrent Desktop 0.12.0, TLP 0.9
    Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator for GNOME (GTK2). The application is inspired from consoles in computer games, such as Quake, in which the console slides from the top of the screen when a key is pressed. In the same way, Guake can be invoked and hidden using a single key (though Guake can also automatically hide when it loses focus).
  • Switch Between Multiple Lists Of Apps Pinned To Unity Launcher With `Launcher List Indicator`
  • MATE Dock Applet Gets Unity-Like Progress Bar And Badge Support
    MATE Dock Applet is a MATE Panel applet that displays running application windows as icons. The applet features options to pin applications to the dock, supports multiple workspaces, and can be added to any MATE Panel, regardless of size and orientation.
  • AppImage – One app framework to distro them all
    Linux is highly portable. Fact. On the other hand, Linux software is the least portable technology in the world. Try running Firefox designed for Debian on Fedora. In fact, try running Firefox designed for one version of Fedora on another Fedora, perhaps a slightly older version. Godspeed, Captain Jack Sparrow. The fanatical rigor with which the Linux backward compatibility is maintained in the enterprise flavors, SUSE and Red Hat, is inversely proportional to all other incompatibilities that exist in the Linux space. This ain’t no news. I have most artfully elaborated on this problem in my illustrated Linux guide. But now, there’s a thing that promises to solve all these problems forever. AppImage.
  • Substance Designer 5.5 Is Here
    This version takes texture creation into the big leagues with MDL material authoring – opening up a whole new world of materials – plus Linux support, fbx camera import and support for VCA. This is a free upgrade for license holders and Substance Live subscribers, or you can get a free 30-day trial version.