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Sunday, 25 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" Cinnamon Review: As always, Impressive! Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:06pm
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Story UNIX Industry Banks on Linux Strategies Roy Schestowitz 24/12/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Mageia Beta Delayed, Christmas Quiz, and 7 Best Alternatives Roy Schestowitz 24/12/2014 - 9:43pm

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 325

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: iMagic OS 2009.9
  • News: The big release season, best 20 features of Mandriva 2010, Arch Linux Handbook, Gentoo in the media, Linux Mint 8 update, Kubuntu in downward spiral
  • Released last week: OpenBSD 4.6, Parsix GNU/Linux 3.0, Puppy Linux 4.3.1
  • Upcoming releases: CentOS 5.4, Fedora 12 Beta, Ubuntu 9.10 RC
  • New distributions: Business Linux, JULinux, Slax Router
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Everything Linux store set for opening on Friday

Filed under
Linux

crn.com.au: Open Source and web development consultancy Babel Com Australia has announced plans to open online retailer Everything Linux Store (ELS) as a bricks and mortar shopfront in Crows Nest, Sydney on October 23.

Tom's Definitive Linux Software Roundup: Communications Apps

Filed under
Software

tomshardware.com: In this segment, we will be focusing on communications applications. While these apps still rely on Internet access to function, their focus is to allow the user to communicate with other individuals using the Internet simply as a transit medium.

GPLv2 clause 6

Filed under
OSS

fsfe.org: So I talked about licenses. And license obligations. And interesting bits of the GPL version 2. There’s one clause of the GPL version 2 that I’d like to single out because it’s one that is surprising to me — and rarely mentioned. Clause 6.

OpenBSD 4.6 release ships new services, eases installation

Filed under
BSD

computerworld.com.au: Latest version sports a new mail server and an easier installation; core network and routing tools also improved.

Top 5 New Things in Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxtree.blogspot: 1. Installation: Overall the same procedure, but with some minor differences in look and feel. Kind of reminds me of the Windows installation which said that even Windows ME was perfect.

Implementing a sensible copyright: "FLOW-IT"

Filed under
Legal

It can be hard to get paid for producing free-licensed works. This has spurred a lot of innovative ideas for better incentive systems. Along the way, though, the most obvious and simple solution has mostly been overlooked.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • KMail is slow
  • Re-enable Missing Icons In Ubuntu 9.10
  • Migration from Mac to Linux
  • An Interview With Mako
  • Platinum Arts Sandbox Free 3D Game Maker 2.4 Release
  • How To Write, Compile and Execute C Programs under Linux
  • Open Source Hardware
  • Understanding PHP Exception Handling

On the future of Linux security

Filed under
Linux

blog.eracc.com: I want to explore the future of GNU/Linux. You know, the time in the near future when “Once ‘Linux’ is (as|more) popular (as|than) ‘Windows’ it will start getting all those viruses too.”

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #164

Filed under
Ubuntu

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #164 for the week October 11th - October 17th, 2009 is available.

Ubuntu Linux powers up

Filed under
Ubuntu

washingtontimes.com: Just how important are computer operating systems, anyway? We're going to get an indication Thursday morning, when Microsoft Corp. is scheduled to launch Windows 7.

Review: Parsix GNU Linux 3.0 Kev

Filed under
Linux

reviewlinux.com: It's a beautiful Sunday afternoon here in BC Canada. What a better day to look at Parsix GNU/Linux 3.0 "Kev" for my first time.

few more howtos & stuff

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • 8 Useful extensions for Google chrome
  • Disable KDE’s HTTP Cache Cleaner
  • Windows 7 Launches. Get Linux Instead
  • Troubleshoot networking problems with GNOME’s Nettools
  • Networking Ubuntu PCs with SSHFS
  • Why Wait. Upgrade to Ubuntu 9.10 Now

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Open Source Software -- A Way Forward
  • GetDeb v2 Beta Available
  • IntelliJ IDEA Goes Open Source
  • Packman: deleting 10.2 packages
  • Quickest way for audio editing
  • My development setup
  • Test: Windows 7 better than Mac OS X and Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Enchance your launchbar in Linux with Cairo-Dock
  • Tip of the day: if Samba 3.4 fails to work…
  • How to install Opera Web Browser in Ubuntu including flash, Java Plugins
  • Howto install Real Player 11 in Debian Lenny
  • How to replace Windows with Kubuntu - part III, IV, V

10 things to do after installing Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

techradar.com: You've finally decided to try Linux. The installation went without a hitch (they usually do these days) and you've got a shiny new desktop sitting in front of you. What do you do next?

Closed Design or No Design? Something is better than nothing.

Filed under
Ubuntu

obso1337.org: Recently, Mark Shuttleworth announced on the Ayatana list an attempt to improve existing Ubuntu design processes by closing design participation and feedback from the community to invite-only. This has been met with mixed reviews.

first experience with Archlinux

Filed under
Linux

milianw.de/blog: I kinda messed up my desktop right after the upgrade to karmic, because I was too greedy for performance and converted my root file system to ext4. Since I’d had to reinstall anyways, I decided to finally try out Archlinux.

IMDb Turns 19 - Older Than The Web Browser

Filed under
Movies
Web

techcrunch.com: If you load up the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) today, you’ll see a new logo commemorating its 19th birthday. Yes, that’s really old for the Internet.

coupla file recovery apps

Filed under
Software
  • Toolbox: Roadkil's Unstoppable Copier
  • Recover deleted files with Magic Rescue
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Today in Techrights

Debian 9 Review: Stable Like Ever, Better Than Most

Debian is one of the oldest and most famous Linux distributions of all time. Its development started back in 1993 by its founder Ian Murdock who passed away in 2015. It’s also known to be the mother-distribution of tens of other Linux distributions such as Ubuntu. Debian has a strict policy on software packages. It only ships free software by default. It doesn’t even ship non-free firmware and drivers. If you want, you can enable the non-free package repository later to install those packages. But you won’t find it there by default. Debian is well-known for its stability. They don’t ship new updates to users unless it was tested. Which is why you may notice some very old package versions when using Debian. It’s correct that they are old, but they are also tested and secure. Most discovered vulnerabilities get patched in Debian in a matter of hours or few days. Those users who would like to get latest and most updated software could switch to using the testing or unstable branch. Both contain more modern software according to a different policy. The effort which is being done by the Debian project for each release is huge. Currently, they offer 25000 source packages and 51000 binary packages. Getting all of those software from upstream projects, packaging them, testing them, debugging issues and fixing them is definitely not something you hear about everyday. Read more Also: Upgrade to Debian Stretch - GlusterFS fails to mount New: VOYAGER 9 Debian Stretch

Liri – Loves me, loves me not … at all

What does the world of Linux need more? Desktop environments? Nope. Ah, well, you’d be surprised, because a fresh new challenger appears! Its name is Liri, and it is the presentation layer for the namesake operating system being baked in the forges of community creativity as we speak. Sounds potentially interesting, but then we must be wary. I’ve trawled through the obscure, uncharted waters of Budgie, Razor-Qt and more recently, and with much greater attention to detail, LXQt, and in all of these cases, I was left rather dissatisfied with the end product. Not enough cohesion, quality, future roadmap, and most importantly, the finesse that you expect from polished, professional products. Then again, building a desktop environment is a huge undertaking, probably even more complex than spinning a new distro, and so, it’s not a coincidence that there are few serious contenders in this space. But Liri comes with enticing artwork, a promise of Material Design for the desktop, and so here we are, trying to get the first feel of what it does. Read more

Microsoft Breaches and Their Impact