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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Latest Mplayer &x264 video encoder in Ubuntu from PPA
  • The Bash Shell: Doing Your Math
  • Manage startup services in Linux with BUM
  • Graphical IP Blocker
  • Dual-booting Windows 7 and Ubuntu 10.10
  • allow ssh login to only certain users | AllowUsers | DenyUsers

Replacing KDE4

Filed under
KDE
Software

linuxtoday.com: Yes, I am one of those grumpy KDE 3.x fans who can't deal with KDE4. So I've been trying out different desktop environments and window managers to replace my beloved KDE, and it has been fun and enlightening. In the past few weeks I've tested XFCE, LXDE, Fluxbox, FVWM, Ratpoison, IceWM, Afterstep, and others I have forgotten about already.

Linux Plays well with Others

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Two of my friends transfered out NIU this semester, both of them are running various forms of GNU/Linux on their personal computers. One of them is not so technically inclined and he asked me to help him trouble shoot why his Ubuntu system could not get an internet connection.

The Desktop Computer Comeback

Filed under
Hardware

pcmag.com: It's senseless to do real computing on a laptop or iPad. For that, you need a big honkin' desktop.

Defining Wayland & Its Input System Are Discussed

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: If you have any interest at all in the technical side of the Wayland Display Server, there's been two mailing list threads in particular worth paying attention to this week.

Open Source’s 7 Lucky Forecasts for 2011

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: Well, nobody gets tired of making predictions, or at least thinking of what the future looks like. So, here are 7 lucky predictions that could be made for Linux or the Open Source community as a whole:

Sabayon 5.5 Screenshots Tour

Filed under
Linux

unixmen.com: Sabayon Linux 5.5 is released, it is available for both GNOME and KDE editions . This new release features best AMD/ATI and NVIDIA Desktop support, faster boot time compared to Sabayon 5.4, improved Windows autostart support, try Sabayon directly from your Microsoft OS and more.

10 Fresh and Awesome Google Chrome Themes

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: When Google Chrome was still at version 3.0, a very limited number of themes were available. Today, there are already tons of cool Google Chrome themes or skins at hand that can be instantly and easily downloaded and installed.

Big Brother on the Internet?

Filed under
Web
  • Big Brother on the Internet? (week in review)
  • FCC seeks to dismiss challenges to Internet rules
  • How the Internet went out in Egypt
  • "Plan D" - How To Disrupt the U.S.A.'s Internet
  • Internet ‘Kill Switch’ Legislation Back in Play

Cave Story is Highly Addictive

Filed under
Gaming
  • Cave Story is Highly Addictive Platformer for Linux
  • Freedoom 0.7 Released
  • All about the beta!

Days 3 and 4 of #LCA2011

Filed under
Linux
  • Days 3 and 4 of #LCA2011; rockets, balloons, Linus Torvalds
  • LCA 2011: Keynote speaker censured over sexual images
  • Linux.conf.au 2012 venue announced
  • Linux.conf.au - Day Four

LibreOffice – A Free Office Suite

Filed under
LibO
OSS
  • LibreOffice 3.3 – Advancing Without Oracle
  • LibreOffice – A Free Office Suite For Windows, Linux & Mac
  • The Deeper Significance of LibreOffice 3.3

Fancy, stylish Docks for your Linux

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: While most operating systems ship their desktops with static top and bottom panels containing all kinds of icons, docks are livelier, sometimes animated, featuring a slick interface and cool transitions, and usually add color and spice to the typical computer experience.

KDE SC 4.6 Review

Filed under
KDE

cristalinux.blogspot: Hot off the oven, the latest from KDE was released just a few days ago. It builds on the greatly improved and reliable KDE 4.4 and 4.5 series and brings a number of exciting new features and enhancements, as well as a cool new look thanks to an impressive new wallpaper and much improved Kwin effects.

openSuSE 11.6 Milestone 6

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet.co.uk: For those who are looking for a conclusion to my recent blog post about openSuSE 11.4 development, there is generally good news.

Pandora open-source handheld available for order again

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Pandora open-source handheld available for order again
  • Pandora open-source console goes on general sale
  • Pandora handheld back on sale: get yours in a week
  • Skip the queue and purchase your Pandora open-source gaming device for $500

OpenOffice.org 3.3

Filed under
OOo

zdnet.co.uk: This is a welcome update, but it's definitely a point release: unless you're looking for an alternative to Microsoft Office on financial or philosophical grounds, 3.3 may not be the version to make you switch.

Mozilla’s ‘Home Dash’ is a Dashboard for Your Personal Web

Filed under
Moz/FF

webmonkey.com: Mozilla Labs has cranked out an interesting new experiment dubbed Home Dash, a Firefox add-on that removes the standard web browser interface — the location bar, search bar and tabs — and leaves behind just a Firefox logo. Click the logo and you’ll be presented with a dashboard where your most-visited sites are found.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Gnome Activity Journal 0.6.0 released
  • Ferlito re-elected Linux Australia president
  • Browser Wars 2.0: Us vs. Them
  • Why AGIMO’s open source policy will change nothing
  • Sendmail, an MTA for the ages
  • Firefox 5 announced for Q2 2011
  • Sugar on a Stick: Student responses / observations
  • downtrend spotted in shares of red hat
  • Red Hat (RHT) Upgraded by Stifel Nicolaus to “Buy”
  • Red Hat Partners with Arizona State University for FUDCon
  • Industrial computer speeds up, eases access
  • CodeWeavers Introduces CrossOver Impersonator
  • Developer Interview: Lips of Suna
  • GNU Status Reports: January 2011
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 387
  • Linux.Conf.Au - Day Three
  • US: Government instructs its procurers not to discriminate against open source
  • Mandriva Team will be present at the FOSDEM 2011
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 3 Episode 2
  • FLOSS Weekly 150: Ledger

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Chasing Your ‘Tail’ With Linux
  • Installing python-cloudfiles from pypi
  • Install The Ubuntu Tips Applet To Get Useful Ubuntu Tips On Your Desktop
  • Create an HDR image with a single photo
  • CentOS install over VNC
  • Becoming an Ubuntu Developer: a short guide
  • How to set up a Harmony remote using Linux
  • How to Supercharge Your Shell with Bashish
  • Convert RAW Files to DNG with DNGConverter
  • How to increase the size of Compiz shadows under app windows
  • Positional Parameters
  • Extracting aac Audio from a flv File
  • Python for Newbies – Part2
  • Customising Dates in Evolution
  • SIP - A Multimedia Communications Protocol
  • Apple Mac OS Theme For Ubuntu, Fedora, SUSE
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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.