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Monday, 25 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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coupla teehees

Filed under
Humor

Oracle Still To Make OpenSolaris Changes

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: One of the open-source projects that Oracle hasn't been too open about their intentions with has been OpenSolaris. Solaris Express Community Edition (SXCE) already closed up last month and there hasn't been too much information flowing out about the next OpenSolaris release.

FOSS Legal Strategy Session Silicon Valley: Success!

Filed under
OSS

lawandlifesiliconvalley.com/blog: On February 10, 2010, the Linux Foundation and the Open Source Initiative co sponsored their first Legal Strategic Planning Session. I am glad to declare it a success. We had a very diverse group both professionally and geographically, with participants from Europe, Japan and the US.

Let My Codecs Go

Filed under
Software
  • Let My Codecs Go: Will Google Free VP8?
  • Risks in Google killing Adobe Flash
  • HTML5 looks like broken hackish kludge

Customizing the Ubuntu Application Stack Before Installation

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu is way easier to install than certain other operating systems. But it would be even greater if I could select which applications I wanted on my new system before the Ubiquity installer goes about its business.

Bruce Perens: Inside Open Source's Historic Victory

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Jacobsen v. Katzer is closed, after five years. Open Source won, and big. The details are fascinating. Let's start with the Open Source developer: Bob Jacobsen.

Say Everything: Blogging as open-source journalism.

Filed under
Reviews

As fascinating as the chronicle of blogging are the constant dismissals of it through its decade-plus history, as both a literary medium and an alternative to professional journalism. And Rathergate, the defining moment when the latter got its comeuppance, is thoroughly documented...

More here...

Tips to help users migrate to OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

ghacks.net: The office suite. Ah the importance you hold over the PC user. You help our business to flow, you help us to draft our papers and novels, and you help us communicate. But what of those users who previously were using Microsoft Office or any other office suite?

the futility of termcap in Linux

Filed under
Linux

landley.net: Back in the 1970's Unix systems used to output to various hardware devices. First there were teletypes. This is what "tty" is an abbreviation for: teletype. By the time Linux got started, external display hardware that spoke its own serial protocol had been gone for a decade. This meant that terminfo and termcap no longer served any real purpose.

What's wrong with Gentoo, anyway?

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.flameeyes.eu: Yesterday I snapped and declared my intent to resign from Gentoo. Why did that happen? Well, it’s a huge mix of problems, all joined together by one common factor: no matter how much work I pour into getting Gentoo working like it should be, more problems are generated by sloppy work from at least one or two developers.

A handbook for the open source way, written the open source way

Filed under
OSS

opensource.com: Remember the Seinfeld episode where Kramer had the idea to make a coffee table book about coffee tables? I always thought that was a pretty elegant idea. Well, a few months ago, some of the smart folks on Red Hat's community architecture team had a similarly elegant idea:

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 342

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Interview with Clement Lefebvre and first look at Linux Mint 8
  • News: Linux Mint ends "distro hopping", Debian releases first 6.0 installer, Ubuntu outlines new netbook interface with Enlightenment, OpenSolaris developers fear for project's future, Mandriva "Cooker" updates
  • Questions and answers: Disk mount options
  • Released last week: Calculate Linux 10.2, Element 1.0
  • Upcoming releases: PC-BSD 8.0, Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 3, Mandriva Linux 2010.1 Alpha 3
  • New distributions: Shackbox, Tritech Service System
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux Mint 8 Fluxbox CE review:

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: As I mentioned on February 12th, the long-awaited Fluxbox Community Edition of Linux Mint has been released, and I’ve had the opportunity to install it on my laptop to give it a whirl.

fun with irc clients

Filed under
Software

scrye.com: So, after having a pretty productive Fedora day yesterday (I cleaned up EPEL buildroot override tags/closed tickets, caught up on all my mailing lists and such, started in on some package reviews, helped people on IRC, etc) I decided to play around with some new IRC clients today.

My typical archlinux desktop

Filed under
Linux

distrocheck.wordpress: The more distrohopping I do, the more I realize I’ll never feel as comfortable as on arch. I don’t like being forced to use applications or settings that other people think are the best, I have my own best, and I can only do that if I build a system from the ground up.

Tin Hat: High security Linux

Filed under
Linux

net-security.org: Tin Hat is a Linux distribution derived from hardened Gentoo which aims to provide a very secure, stable and fast Desktop environment that lives purely in RAM.

CloudLinux OS Set to Surface At Parallels Summit

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy is booked to meet software giants and disruptive upstarts at Parallels Summit 2010 in Miami. Among the anticipated meetings: A sit-down with Cloud Linux Inc. founder and CEO Igor Seletskiy. The big question: Does the hosting world really need yet another Linux distribution?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Making Myself Clear About Ubuntu Development
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #181
  • Open letter to Google: free VP8 on YouTube
  • Pino Twitter Client Goes Experimental:
  • Chocolate Doom 1.3.0
  • Of the powers we choose to lose
  • Aseigo: day 2 of tokamak 4 (and a bit about day 1, too)
  • Marave 0.6 is out
  • Lucid development: Hook for catching X.org freezes
  • Linux Basement - Episode 50 - Milestone Debauchery

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing Debian via USB
  • How to install skype on Ubuntu 9.10
  • How to Get Mac’s QuickLook Function In Ubuntu
  • How to install Angry IP Scanner on Ubuntu
  • Getting list of referers out of Apache logs
  • Install Perl modules using CPAN
  • Zattoo - Watch Online TV for free
  • Install Keepalived To Provide IP Failover For Web Cluster
  • Debian Console, Framebuffer, Grub2
  • BleachBit- frees disk space, removes junk, and guards your privacy
  • File compressors in Linux | gzip zip tar
  • GUI GRUB Editor using Startup Manager in Ubuntu
  • Resize multiple pictures with a too high resolution
  • Pure EFI Linux Boot on Macbooks

get new wallpaper images every day

Filed under
Software

nancib.wordpress: A couple of weeks ago I was reading somewhere (I can’t recall where now) and someone mentioned Webilder for using Webshots images on GNU/Linux systems. I looked at the software a little more closely and decided to give it a whirl.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more

BackSlash Linux Olaf

While using BackSlash, I had two serious concerns. The first was with desktop performance. The Plasma-based desktop was not as responsive as I'm used to, in either test environment. Often times disabling effects or file indexing will improve the situation, but the desktop still lagged a bit for me. My other issue was the program crashes I experienced. The Discover software manager crashed on me several times, WPS crashed on start-up the first time on both machines, I lost the settings panel once along with my changes in progress. These problems make me think BackSlash's design may be appealing to newcomers, but I have concerns with the environment's stability. Down the road, once the developers have a chance to iron out some issues and polish the interface, I think BackSlash might do well targeting former macOS users, much the same way Zorin OS tries to appeal to former Windows users. But first, I think the distribution needs to stabilize a bit and squash lingering stability bugs. Read more