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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google launch Android Wear Apps on Play Store Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:16am
Story Systemd 215 Works On Factory Reset, DHCPv4 Server Support Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 7:08am
Story Wink's Linux Hub and Mobile App Take on Home Automation Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 11:26pm
Story Linux 3.14 Is Now A Long-Term Stable Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 10:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 8:51pm
Story Intel Linux Driver Trying Bay Trail Aggressive Downclocking Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 8:03pm
Story 100,000 App Downloads Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 7:59pm
Story XFDASHBOARD: GNOME SHELL LIKE DASHBOARD FOR XFCE Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 6:06pm
Story Testing Btrfs On The Linux 3.16 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 5:59pm
Story BFS Scheduler Updated For The Linux 3.15 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 03/07/2014 - 5:55pm

Linus Torvalds Upset over Ext3 and Ext4

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: It all started with a request for help from Jesper Krogh in one of the first responses to Torvalds's announcement March 24 of Kernel 2.6.29 on the gmane.linux.kernel mailing list.

Linux kernel advances

Filed under
Linux

ibm.com/developerworks: At the end of 2008, the 2.6.28 kernel surfaced. Subsequently, the merge window for the next release—2.6.29—opened. As the Linux kernel uses a distributed development process, it's not always clear what's coming (or will be integrated) into a given kernel release, but the last two have been interesting.

Review: Amarok 2.0.2 - Better Than 1.4?

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: Amarok always had the reputation of being the most popular and powerful audio player available on the Linux platform, and it really deserved that position.

Five things every Linux distribution should do

Filed under
Linux

planetoss.com: I've started using Linux with Redhat 6.2, which was released in 2000. The list of popular distributions available back then was limited to Redhat, Mandriva, SUSE, Debian and Slackware. The search for 'Active' distributions on distrowatch listed 296 distributions as of today.

New releases catch-up

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Here's some recent updates for those of you too busy to hit F5 on Freshmeat every 10 seconds.

Recession vs. FOSS

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: Pundits and business executives alike are predicting gloomy economic times for 2009. But when the talk turns to free and open source software (FOSS), suddenly the mood brightens.

first look at Ubuntu 9.04 beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: Ubuntu 9.04, codenamed Jaunty Jackalope, has reached the beta stage. Ars hops onto the new beta release to see how it performs.

Linux Foundation Welcomes credativ

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: The Linux Foundation welcomed its newest member today, the European-based free and open source standards consulting firm, credativ.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 296

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Review: Tiny Core Linux 1.2

  • News: Developers quit PCLinuxOS to start Unity Linux, OpenSolaris package management improvements, Fedora tests Nouveau driver, interview with founder of Qimo 4 Kids
  • Released last week: Puppy Linux 4.2, SUSE Linux Enterprise 11
  • Upcoming releases: CentOS 5.3, Fedora 11 Beta, Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC2
  • New additions: Zeroshell
  • New distributions: Noys, Unity Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

The GPL - Not fade away

Filed under
OSS

h-online.com: These days free and open source software (FOSS) is recognised as a significant model for the development and distribution of software, transforming the way that software is written, perceived, packaged and sold. A large part of the success has been due to the GNU General Public License (GPL).

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • What's new in Linux kernel 2.6.29?

  • How To Configure A Firewall In Linux Using Firestarter
  • Good-Bye XP. Hello Windows 7
  • Introducing pointy-haired bosses to FOSS
  • Yahoo! POP3 And SMTP Access Using YPOPS! In Ubuntu
  • Smart Home with LinuxMCE
  • Upgrade to KDE 4.2.1
  • Working with libnotify
  • Add Vim Editing Mode To Your ZSH Prompt
  • Jaunty Blues
  • Skype with Ubuntu - It works
  • How to Gain Root Access in Ubuntu
  • Of desktop environments and window managers
  • Never fear Linux
  • Idle Process Time On Linux: How To Find It Again
  • The Vanishing YouTube Videos and a Look Behind the Scenes

Why do I like Debian

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: I get asked that question a lot. Up until now, it has been a bit difficult to put it into words for me. I finally figured it out today.

SUSE 11 vs Windows 7: no contest

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: SUSE Linux 11 has been out less than 10 days but already there are comparisons of the distribution to Windows - all of which are being accepted as compliments.

Why Desktop Linux Matters

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: Red Hat’s CEO, Jim Whitehurst, spoke out strongly recently against the possibility of Linux ever taking over the desktop computers of the world. His comments may reflect Red Hat’s increasing distance from reality, but I don’t think they’re grounded in facts. Here’s why.

regexxer: search/replace for the masses

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: This thing is great! If you manage a set of files (e.g., a code base) and end up needing to perform a search/replace across the files, or some subset thereof, maybe regexxer will end up being counted among your friends.

Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope Beta on the Mini 9

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntumini.com: Installing Ubuntu on the Dell Mini 9 was never hard, but getting everything working was. Ubuntu 9.04 Beta does not require any extra fixes or patches.

Does the Linux Desktop Need to Be Revolutionized Android-style?

Filed under
Linux

codingexperiments.com: So, a few days ago, I got a spankin’ new T-Mobile G1. This has resulted in a lot of hands-on experience with the user interface of Google’s Android platform. I can’t help but compare the Android OS to Openmoko Linux.

GNOME vs. KDE: Which Has the Evolutionary Advantage?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: A few weeks ago, Jack Wallen published a comparison of recent GNOME and KDE releases in which he claims that the desktop flame wars in GNU/Linux were about to reignite, and that KDE would emerge as the loser. It was not the most technically accurate of articles, and the claim of renewed desktop wars was news to me.

Building on Richard Stallman's Greatest Achievement

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: What was Richard Stallman's greatest achievement? Some might say it's Emacs. Others might plump for gcc. And then there is the entire GNU project. But for me, his single most important hack was the creation of the GNU General Public Licence.

10 Cool Cursor Themes for Linux

Filed under
Software

cooltuxapps.com: If you are looking for a beautiful, cool, lovely cursor theme for Linux, I recommend the following cursor themes.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux: Why do people hate systemd?
    systemd has caused an almost unending amount of controversy in the Linux community. Some Linux users have been unyielding in their opposition to systemd, while others have been much more accepting. The topic of systemd came up in a recent thread in the Linux subreddit and the folks there did not pull any punches when sharing their thoughts about it.
  • PulseAudio 10.0 Linux Sound System Released, Offers OpenSSL 1.1.0 Compatibility
    Today, January 19, 2017, sees the official release of the PulseAudio 10.0 open-source sound server for Linux-based operating systems, a major version that introduces many exciting new features. PulseAudio 10.0 has been in development for the past seven months, since the June 22, 2016, release of PulseAudio 9.0, which is currently used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions.
  • Linux is part of the IoT security problem, dev tells Linux conference
    The Mirai botnet? Just the “tip of the iceberg” is how security bods at this week's linux.conf.au see the Internet of Things. Presenting to the Security and Privacy miniconf at linux.conf.au, embedded systems developer and consultant Christopher Biggs pointed out that Mirai's focus on building a big DDoS cannon drew attention away from the other risks posed by insecure cameras and digital video recorders.
  • The Linux Foundation Brings 3 New Open Source Events to China
    LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen will be held in China this year for the first time, The Linux Foundation announced this week. After the success of other Linux Foundation events in the country, including MesosCon Asia and Cloud Foundry Summit Asia, The Linux Foundation decided to offer its flagship LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen events in China as well, said Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin. “Chinese developers and businesses have strongly embraced open source and are contributing significant amounts of code to a wide variety of projects,” Zemlin said. “We have heard the call to bring more open source events to China.”

Dell Has Sold ‘Tens of Millions’ Dollars’ Worth of Linux Laptops

So popular Linux personality Bryan Lunduke, who recently took an hour out to talk to Dell’s Senior Architect in the office of CTO — try saying that with a mouthful of doughnut — Barton George. What did he learn? Well, for one, Dell says it has ‘no plans’ to start shipping its Linux-powered developer laptops with anything other than Ubuntu. Read more

Open-source voting is the answer to hacking concerns

Will we ever have a voting system that is completely error-proof and impenetrable from malicious forces? Not likely. But the security breaches that are increasingly a part of daily life serve as a call to action. Every day brings a new report of hacking or suspicious activity, and increasingly with fingers pointing to international actors. Whether it is statewide voter registration databases (Illinois and Arizona; some say more); national party organizations (the Democratic National Committee); utilities (Vermont’s Burlington Electric); or Russia’s state-run television station (RT) suddenly interrupting C-SPAN last week — the incident is still under investigation and not confirmed as a hack — it is all very unsettling and leaves us feeling vulnerable. Read more

The Many, the Humble, the Ubuntu Users

I have never been much of a leading-edge computing person. In fact, I first got mildly famous online writing a weekly column titled “This Old PC” for Time/Life about making do with used gear — often by installing Linux on it — and after that an essentially identical column for Andover.net titled “Cheap Computing,” which was also about saving money in a world where most online computing columns seemed to be about getting you to spend until you had no money left to spend on food. Read more