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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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What is So Great About Linux

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot.com: The simple commitment to share code is probably the single most powerful contributor to the growth of the open source software movement in general, and Linux in particular. The willingness of Linus to incorporate code from others in the Linux kernel has also been critical to the success of Linux. The following sections characterize Linux and the communities.

9 useful Linux commands everyone should use

Filed under
Linux

blogs.howtogeek.com: Just switched from Windows and still a bit scared about the command line? You shouldn't be! The command line is a very powerful, fast and intuitive tool to get things done without clicking buttons and navigating through windows.

Switching From Windows To Linux In 3 Easy Steps

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: In my ongoing quest to take over the world with Linux as my OS of choice, I've noticed that simply handing someone an install CD doesn't really do the trick. The problem is that hating Windows isn't enough. Most people hate Windows, but feel trapped into using it. That's where my 3 step approach comes in.

What Xandros Has Up Its Sleeve

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Custom Linux provider Xandros will release a free Linux OS called "Freespire 5" during the fourth quarter of 2008. This next version of Freespire will be based on the Debian GNU/Linux "Lenny" release rather than the Ubuntu Linux platform Freespire 4 uses.

Source for the goose should be source for the gander

Filed under
OSS

ft.com: Jamie Boyle’s sensible defence of open-source software starts in a disarming way, by suggesting that the Federal Circuit’s decision in Jacobsen v Katzer, which upheld the validity of an open-source copyright claim, was one of those dry-as-dust decisions that only intellectual property geeks could love.

Top 200 Tech Blogs: the Datamation List

Filed under
Web

earthweb.com: The universe of tech blogs is solar system-sized and getting bigger all the time. Part of what makes it so vast is an inescapable fact: people interested in technology spend inordinate time with computers, so naturally a Web-based medium is wildly popular. So the question becomes more difficult every year: Which of the gazillion tech blogs are worth your time?

40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista!

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Challenged by my iTWire colleague and Linux lover Sam Varghese to come up with 40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista, I’ve done just that.

Tint2 + Trayer

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: In my last screenshot-post I was still using LXpanel. It’s just that it looks a bit boring…even with transparency turned on. Enter: tint2.

Survey Says: Ubuntu Server Gaining Momentum

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Conventional wisdom says Ubuntu’s popularity is limited to desktop PCs and laptops. However, a reader survey by Works With U reveals that nearly 80 percent of organizations running Ubuntu depend on at least one production Ubuntu server. Here’s the scoop.

Five Useful Extensions for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux-magazine.com: Want to expand OpenOffice.org's default functionality? The official extension repository has quite a few extensions you can use to add some nifty features to the productivity suite. Precisely which extensions you might find useful depends, of course, on your particular needs, but there are at least five extensions that deserve a closer look no matter how you use OpenOffice.org.

Google pledges 9 month anonymity on data

Filed under
Google

techradar.com: Google has responded to mounting EU pressure on privacy by stating it will 'anonymize' users' IP addresses after nine months.

When Will They Ever Learn?

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: Here's some news from Red Hat: We’ve partnered with Seneca College, one of the leaders in instituting open source software into its coursework, to bring Fedora to the classroom. What's remarkable about this is that Red Hat considers it remarkable. And, sadly, it *is* remarkable.

Ubuntu In Popular Culture

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniel.holba.ch/blog: Yesterday we watched “Berlin am Meer” - not a world-changing, but nice movie which plays in Berlin. I was pleased to see they used Ubuntu in a short scene.

Polishing Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: In an effort to increase the level of Firefox’s visual and interactive polish, I’ll be posting a list of around 7 bugs every monday from now until we finish up Firefox 3.1.

Don't be Afraid of Linux

Filed under
Linux

shoutwire.com: When it comes to dual-booting Linux and Windows, your average computer user will shit himself six ways from Sunday and refuse because he doesn't want to have to learn anything new. Most people are just too damn intimidated by all the geek rhetoric they hear online and honestly just don't want to screw up their machine.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu is really boring me on my desktop

  • Fully Automatic Installation for all distributions
  • More fun X-based stuff
  • Gambas - Almost Visual Basic for Linux
  • Lego-like Linux modules ready to ship
  • Interactive C# Shell
  • A Flurry of Open Source Video-Related News
  • The all new Ubuntu Brainstorm
  • openSUSE Build Service Build Checks
  • Microsoft, Novell Making Virtualization Moves At VMworld
  • No tiling support for KDE 4.2
  • Bill and Jerry, Chrome and the Next Linux Generation
  • Ad danger to open source
  • How pot may win the war against super-bacteria

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Swear Words

  • Visualizing open source software
  • Linux Outlaws 53 - Duck Porn?!

Review: Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One

  • OLPC's Amazon Notebook Linux Only
  • ASUS Eee PC 901 falls to a cool $500
  • Bootleg videos to blame for Linux MSI Wind delay?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org: Knowing when to use Impress

  • Improve login time by using readahead in Ubuntu
  • Linux Wi-Fi Works With wicd
  • Use Amarok as An Alarm Clock
  • Configuring IceWM: Basics
  • Linux Performance Hunting Tips - Take Copious Notes (Save Everything)
  • Avoid OpenDNS Free DNS Service Like The Plague
  • Tip: USB key problem on Mandriva
  • DIY File Server
  • Finding Overlapping Matches Using Perl's Lookahead Assertion Matching
  • small Qt based mail biff
  • Expanding text with Snippits in Linux

Ubuntu debuts Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com.au: The Ubuntu project has detailed plans for the April 2009 version of its Linux distribution, continuing its habit of naming its software after animals by dubbing Ubuntu 9.04 "The Jaunty Jackalope".

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.