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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:24pm
Story Leftovers: FSF/GNU Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:20pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:17pm
Story The Bitcoin Schism Shows the Genius of Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:16pm
Story Calls for city that ditched Microsoft for Linux to switch laptops to Windows Roy Schestowitz 1 19/08/2015 - 4:16pm
Story Teaching DevOps and open source to a new generation Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 4:11pm
Story Canonical's IP Policy Is Deliberately Vague, Says Matthew Garrett Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:55pm
Story GTK+ 3.18 to Receive Support for Touchpad Gesture Events for Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:53pm
Story Intel Israel engineers Android phone 3D camera coup Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Ubuntu phone in South Africa: Aquaris E5 HD unboxing Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2015 - 9:18am

Two Popular Distributions Release Development Milestones

Filed under
SUSE
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: On Thurday, September 2 two leading Linux distributions released milestone developmental versions on the road to their next releases. OpenSUSE released Milestone 1 of 11.4 and Ubuntu released a beta of their upcoming 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat, for developers and community testers.

Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxaria.com: I’ve used it in a virtual machine on VirtualBox and I’ve been very happy with the system, when it starts you have the opportunity to start KDE or Fluxbox, I chose Fluxbox. Once started, you will have the opportunity to start various “services” that will be used in exercises, such as a webserver and mysql.

Lucene Search Coming to openSUSE Wiki

Filed under
Web
SUSE

matthewehle.info: Most openSUSE users are aware that a new version of the English wiki was released back in July, with the other wikis soon to follow. Among many other changes, the new wiki came with a laundry list of new features. However, users have noticed that one important feature was still missing in the new wiki… a decent search engine.

Why the Linux Myths Continue

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: What will it take for Linux to lose the stigma that surrounds it in the eyes of IT administrators? If those particular myths could be undone, Linux adoption in businesses might benefit enormously. So what makes the myths continue?

Book review - Learn OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macros

Filed under
OOo

pcworld.com: My name is John Dukovich. I've been working with Microsoft Office applications, basically since they came out, and I'm a heavy user of Excel macros. I shied away from OpenOffice Calc for quite a while because initially I heard the macro feature wasn't as good as Excel's. However, when I got my hands on this book, OpenOffice.org Spreadsheet Macro Programming, I was curious and hoped to find I was wrong.

Project Canvas Will be *Linux* Based

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

opendotdotdot.blogspot: I've been pretty sceptical - and critical - of the BBC's TV over IP efforts, including Project Canvas:

Also: Tanner EDA Tools Now on Linux

Microdata: HTML5’s Best-Kept Secret

Filed under
Software

webmonkey.com: Given the amount of industry noise about native video and scripted animations, you’d be forgiven if you had never heard of the new microdata specification included in HTML5.

Comings and goings in the Linux gaming world

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Today, I'm going to discuss the interesting phenomena, rise and fall of companies, games, technologies, and other cool stuff, all related to Linux gaming. So, this is not exactly a review, but we will definitely talk about the hot cakes in the gaming oven.

Chakra Linux - Distro Review

Filed under
Linux

jeffhoogland.blogspot: The Chakra project started off as a derivative of Arch Linux. It was a modular KDE Live CD with some extra tool sets to make setting up and using Arch Linux less of a hassle.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.36 (Part 1) - Graphics

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Various changes improve the performance and functionality of drivers for graphics chips in the latest Intel mobile processors. Nouveau now supports the Fermi chips used on recent GeForce graphics cards.

The HP Mini 110 Netbook: Almost One Year Later

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Last October, after my third Sylvania netbook failed, I took the refund I had received and bought an HP Mini 110 netbook as a replacement.

OpenIndiana - Another OpenSolaris Fork - Coming Next Week

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: There is already the Illumos Project, which is a fork of OpenSolaris with a fully open-source code-base, that is now being used within the Nexenta and SchilliX operating systems, among others. We have just been tipped off as well that next week another new OpenSolaris derivative is being announced and it's to be called OpenIndiana.

5 Things I Miss From Linux When Using OSX

Filed under
Linux

everydaylht.com: I have been a Linux user for over 10 years… until now. Recently I purchased a MacBook Pro. In the course of using it, I’ve come across a number of features of Linux and the KDE desktop that I greatly miss.

Linux Mint “Debian” Screenshots

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Mint “Debian” Screenshots
  • Mint 10 Preview: Menu Search Engines
  • Distro Hoppin`: Linux Mint Debian Edition

3 Visually-Pleasing Linux Distributions That Use Enlightenment

Filed under
Linux
Software

makeuseof.com: Continuing the recent trend of highlighting lesser-known operating systems, this week we bring you three that should at least look good. As opposed to the usual GNOME or KDE window managers found on most Linux distributions, these have all chosen in favour of Enlightenment.

The first english Issue of PET (our Python Magazine) is out!

Filed under
Software

netmanagers.com.ar: Hell yeah! It has been a lot of work but it's out at http://revista.python.org.ar

Open Source Community Types

Filed under
OSS
  • Simon Says: Open Source Community Types
  • The Cost of Open Source Licensing Compliance
  • Meet the New Kingmakers: Same as the Old Kingmakers
  • Behind the open source turnaround at Broadcom
  • Open Source Licensing made easy for Italian Public Admins
  • Contribute to the OSS Watch National Survey 2010

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Can Debian achieve world domination without Facebook?
  • How the command line made my life a little easier
  • Magic Trackpad drivers land in Ubuntu
  • New Oracle Solaris Is Here
  • Are we done with LDFLAGS?
  • Kubuntu 10.10 Beta Screenshots Gallery
  • APLcomp Joins The Linux Foundation
  • Which Mandriva is in trouble?
  • Celestia: Travel Our Universe in 3-D
  • More Eyecandy On Its Way For Ubuntu 10.10 Installer Slideshow
  • Recipe for Open Standards
  • Ubuntu Insurance?
  • Paradigm Shift
  • Mark Bohannon joins Red Hat as vice president
  • Opensourcers get personal over Ellison's Google fight
  • FLOSS Weekly 134: SugarLabs
  • NetApp and Oracle lift ZFS patent cloud
  • the art of blurring the shadow
  • Adopting Open-Source Applications

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create directory trees in one command
  • Learn To Use The Ubuntu Command Line With CLIcompanion
  • commands for OpenOffice applications
  • REE, Passenger and Rails on Ubuntu
  • Rescuing Difficult Panoramas on Linux, Hugin part 2
  • Access Google Docs in Ubuntu desktop via Nautilus File browser
  • Limit Download Speed For Apt Command Using Terminal
  • What is user slaying?
  • vifm: Fast, lightweight, old school file manager
  • Backup Linux? 15 rsync Command Examples
  • Creating Custom Man Pages
  • [SOLVED] NO_PUBKEY 61E091672E206FF0
  • Using Exim4 to send Messages through GMail
  • Debugging shared library problems: a real-world example
  • How-To: Quotes to Live By
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 145: Pictures at an Exhibition

Review: Amnesia - The Dark Descent

Filed under
Gaming

keysakimbo.blogspot: No no no no no, stay away, don't look! Light, light, I need light, where's the light? No, darkness! Hide! Oh god he's going to see me nooooooo... oh, thank god he's gone. Now, what's in this room?" *Sound of door creaking slowly open* Oh... oh god, no.

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NuTyX 10.1-rc1 Available

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Android Leftovers

Events: FOSDEM Samba Talks, USENIX Enigma, LCA (linux.conf.au) and FAST18

  • Authentication and authorization in Samba 4
    Volker Lendecke is one of the first contributors to Samba, having submitted his first patches in 1994. In addition to developing other important file-sharing tools, he's heavily involved in development of the winbind service, which is implemented in winbindd. Although the core Active Directory (AD) domain controller (DC) code was written by his colleague Stefan Metzmacher, winbind is a crucial component of Samba's AD functionality. In his information-packed talk at FOSDEM 2018, Lendecke said he aimed to give a high-level overview of what AD and Samba authentication is, and in particular the communication pathways and trust relationships between the parts of Samba that authenticate a Samba user in an AD environment.
  • Two FOSDEM talks on Samba 4
    Much as some of us would love never to have to deal with Windows, it exists. It wants to authenticate its users and share resources like files and printers over the network. Although many enterprises use Microsoft tools to do this, there is a free alternative, in the form of Samba. While Samba 3 has been happily providing authentication along with file and print sharing to Windows clients for many years, the Microsoft world has been slowly moving toward Active Directory (AD). Meanwhile, Samba 4, which adds a free reimplementation of AD on Linux, has been increasingly ready for deployment. Three short talks at FOSDEM 2018 provided three different views of Samba 4, also known as Samba-AD, and left behind a pretty clear picture that Samba 4 is truly ready for use. I will cover the first two talks in this article, and the third in a later one.
  • A report from the Enigma conference
    The 2018 USENIX Enigma conference was held for the third time in January. Among many interesting talks, three presentations dealing with human security behaviors stood out. This article covers the key messages of these talks, namely the finding that humans are social in their security behaviors: their decision to adopt a good security practice is hardly ever an isolated decision. Security conferences tend to be dominated by security researchers demonstrating their latest exploits. The talks are attack-oriented, they keep a narrow focus, and usually they close with a dark outlook. The security industry has been doing security conferences like this for twenty years and seems to prefer this format. Yet, if you are tired of this style, the annual USENIX Enigma conference is a welcome change of pace. Most of the talks are defense-oriented, they have a horizon going far beyond technology alone, and they are generally focused on successful solutions.
  • DIY biology
    A scientist with a rather unusual name, Meow-Ludo Meow-Meow, gave a talk at linux.conf.au 2018 about the current trends in "do it yourself" (DIY) biology or "biohacking". He is perhaps most famous for being prosecuted for implanting an Opal card RFID chip into his hand; the Opal card is used for public transportation fares in Sydney. He gave more details about his implant as well as describing some other biohacking projects in an engaging presentation. Meow-Meow is a politician with the Australian Science Party, he said by way of introduction; he has run in the last two elections. He founded BioFoundry, which is "Australia's first open-access molecular biology lab"; there are now two such labs in the country. He is also speaks frequently as "an emerging technology evangelist" for biology as well as other topics.
  • Notes from FAST18

    I attended the technical sessions of Usenix's File And Storage Technology conference this week. Below the fold, notes on the papers that caught my attention.