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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story D-Link enters IoT space with a smart AC socket Roy Schestowitz 10/05/2014 - 6:31am
Story Linux pros use tweak tools to customize their OS, and so can you Roy Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Do we really need more giant phablets? Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 7:30pm
Story CyanogenMod finally hits HTC One M8 Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 7:23pm
Story LLVM 3.4.1 Release! Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 7:09pm
Story RadeonSI Starts Beating Catalyst In Some Linux Tests Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 6:57pm
Story Mesa 10.1.3 Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 6:35pm
Story MacOs-Linux 11.04 Officially Killed by Its Developer Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 6:32pm
Story Upcoming Maxwell GPUs Will Support H.265, But VP9 Is Uncertain Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 6:28pm
Story Google Play Services 4.4 now rolling out Rianne Schestowitz 09/05/2014 - 6:24pm

Linux CD Ripping Utilities

Filed under
Software

thelinuxblog.com: CD Ripping with Linux doesn’t have to be the labor intensive task that it once was. No longer do we have the days of writing a hundred character command to rip a CD with the perfect options. Here are some utilities aimed at making your life of ripping your collection of CD’s to a digital format you can actually use.

Calls for open source government

Filed under
OSS

news.bbc.co.uk: The secret to a more secure and cost effective government is through open source technologies and products. The claim comes from Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs): Still Coming Soon?

  • The Case for Open Source Development, a Personal Case Study
  • The Netbook is dead. Long live the notebook!
  • Linux Recording With the MobilePre
  • FLOSS Weekly 52: Casey Reas and Ben Fry on Processing.org
  • The SFLS Episode 0x05: Eben Moglen on Origins of Copyright and Patents
  • Eric Raymond on Hacking, Open Source, and the Cathedral and the Bazaar
  • Comux 000100
  • Auto-launching Programs on Ubuntu Startup
  • Microsoft donates code to Apache Stonehenge project
  • Advantages of IPv6 - The Next Generation Internet
  • Nokia Using Drupal
  • Industrial Linux groups merge
  • Multi-Pointer X Support For GTK+
  • Are you a Linux?
  • about:mozilla Jan 20
  • Back to Gentoo

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Some useful Linux bash tricks

  • Recover Deleted Files Using Linux
  • Making changes to an OpenOffice.org chart in Draw
  • Create a Sound File from a Text File
  • You pushd me again and I will popd you one
  • How To Install And Configure Cairo Dock In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Remotely monitor servers with the Nagios check_by_ssh plugin
  • Using vi to Encrypt Text Files
  • Shared Terminal Sessions over SSH

Open-source chief optimistic about proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The incoming president of an alliance of open-source companies hopes he can persuade big-name proprietary ISVs to join rivals in his group to further interoperability.

"Green" netbook boasts five-hour battery life

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: CherryPal announced an Atom-based "Bing" netbook that runs Linux or Windows XP, and offers a claimed five hours of battery life. The company also announced an upgraded version of its Linux-based nettop, the CherryPal C114, and launched a "Green Maraschino" open-source Linux distribution supporting the Bing.

The Wide Gulf: Techies and Ordinary Users

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I seriously doubt any of my clients will ever be “Linux newbies” for the simple reason too many Linux people assume “newbie” means someone who will become one of the techies.

Open source developers ride the cloud

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Nearly half of developers working on open source projects plan to offer applications as Web services offerings using cloud providers, according to results of an Evans Data open source development survey being released on Tuesday.

DVCS Round-Up: One System to Rule Them All?--Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxfoundation.org: In this review, we will take a look at six different revision control systems. Namely these are git, Mercurial, darcs, Monotone, Bazaar (which is used by the Ubuntu project), and SVK (which is based upon Subversion). All six systems are distributed, and we will take a look at the different workflows supported (or enforced) by them.

Mozilla Wants to Start Watching Where You Click

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.wired.com: In an effort to better understand how people use the web, Mozilla has launched a new data gathering project for usability studies called Test Pilot. It's still just a concept, but as an aggregation model, it shows great promise.

Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

thestreet.com: There are a number of netbooks on the market, but I wanted to get my hands on one loaded with the Linux operating system, Ubuntu.

Netbooks Poised to Be the New OS Battleground?

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In 2009, it won’t be the “year of the desktop” for any operating system–instead, the coveted trophy seems to be “year of the netbook.”

Apple, Linux Miss Golden Opportunity to Snag Desktop Market Share

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: Top-dog OS on the enterprise desktop? Linux and Apple had a golden chance to grab that title, and boy did they blow it!

Like the Pre? Wait Until It's Actually Finished

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

internetnews.com: Palm is taking a page from Apple's iPhone strategy book when it comes to keeping things quiet regarding its newly-announced Pre smartphone and webOS mobile platform.

KDE Voted Free Software Project of the Year

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Linux Format magazine has unveiled its annual Reader Awards for 2008 and KDE won a 'landslide' victory in the category of Free Software Project of the year in recognition of the 'incredible' work done with KDE 4.

Follow up : On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

linux-wizard.net: Adam on his latest blog named On Linux security is 100% right when he's saying that Linux users should not have a false sense of security and impunity when using Linux. The only ways to be protected against theses kinds of issues are:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available (PR)

  • Enterprise Linux 5.2 to 5.3 risk report
  • Red Hat revs Enterprise Linux distro
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3
  • Virtualization gets a boost in RHEL 5.3

Looking for Linux, but sold out

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.the451group: I had an interesting time scouring the Internet for the right netbook for my wife. The biggest hangup was trying to find an Acer Aspire One netbook with Linux on it. It’s not that they aren’t made by the manufacturer, it’s that all the Linux netbooks seem to be getting gobbled up.

It’s All About Community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: When I think of Linux, I think of community. There is lots more to Linux, but it is community that springs to my mind. That is probably because it is like a Second Life for me. I spend much time out there, in the Linux community. But when I think of community, I think of only one thing, Ubuntu.

Songbird - Sleek , Simple and Feature rich cross-platform Music Player

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: I had reviewed Songbird close to two years back , and at that time Songbird was impressive but was bug ridden, lacked important features and certain degree of polishing which was expected from an application intended to be used on Desktops. Songbird 1.0 is an entirely different story altogether.

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More in Tux Machines

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Understanding SELinux Roles
    I received a container bugzilla today for someone who was attempting to assign a container process to the object_r role. Hopefully this blog will help explain how roles work with SELinux. When we describe SELinux we often concentrate on Type Enforcement, which is the most important and most used feature of SELinux. This is what describe in the SELinux Coloring book as Dogs and Cats. We also describe MLS/MCS Separation in the coloring book.
  • The Internet Society is unhappy about security – pretty much all of it
    The Internet Society (ISOC) is the latest organisation saying, in essence, “security is rubbish – fix it”. Years of big data breaches are having their impact, it seems: in its report released last week, it quotes a 54-country, 24,000-respondent survey reporting a long-term end user trend to become more fearful in using the Internet (by Ipsos on behalf of the Centre for International Governance Innovation). Report author, economist and ISOC fellow Michael Kende, reckons companies aren't doing enough to control breaches. “According to the Online Trust Alliance, 93 per cent of breaches are preventable” he said, but “steps to mitigate the cost of breaches that do occur are not taken – attackers cannot steal data that is not stored, and cannot use data that is encrypted.”
  • UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor
    Among the many unpleasant things in the Investigatory Powers Act that was officially signed into law this week, one that has not gained as much attention is the apparent ability for the UK government to undermine encryption and demand surveillance backdoors. As the bill was passing through Parliament, several organizations noted their alarm at section 217 which obliged ISPs, telcos and other communications providers to let the government know in advance of any new products and services being deployed and allow the government to demand "technical" changes to software and systems.
  • EU budget creates bug bounty programme to improve cybersecurity
    Today the European Parliament approved the EU Budget for 2017. The budget sets aside 1.9 million euros in order to improve the EU's IT infrastructure by extending the free software audit programme (FOSSA) that MEPs Max Anderson and Julia Reda initiated two years ago, and by including a bug bounty approach in the programme that was proposed by MEP Marietje Schaake.
  • Qubes OS Begins Commercialization and Community Funding Efforts
    Since the initial launch of Qubes OS back in April 2010, work on Qubes has been funded in several different ways. Originally a pet project, it was first supported by Invisible Things Lab (ITL) out of the money we earned on various R&D and consulting contracts. Later, we decided that we should try to commercialize it. Our idea, back then, was to commercialize Windows AppVM support. Unlike the rest of Qubes OS, which is licensed under GPLv2, we thought we would offer Windows AppVM support under a proprietary license. Even though we made a lot of progress on both the business and technical sides of this endeavor, it ultimately failed. Luckily, we got a helping hand from the Open Technology Fund (OTF), which has supported the project for the past two years. While not a large sum of money in itself, it did help us a lot, especially with all the work necessary to improve Qubes’ user interface, documentation, and outreach to new communities. Indeed, the (estimated) Qubes user base has grown significantly over that period. Thank you, OTF!
  • Linux Security Basics: What System Administrators Need to Know
    Every new Linux system administrator needs to learn a few core concepts before delving into the operating system and its applications. This short guide gives a summary of some of the essential security measures that every root user must know. All advice given follows the best security practices that are mandated by the community and the industry.
  • BitUnmap: Attacking Android Ashmem
    The law of leaky abstractions states that “all non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky”. In this blog post we’ll explore the ashmem shared memory interface provided by Android and see how false assumptions about its internal operation can result in security vulnerabilities affecting core system code.

GNU/FSF

  • The Three Software Freedoms
    The government can help us by making software companies distribute the source code. They can say it's "in the interest of national security". And they can sort out the patent system (there are various problems with how the patent system handles software which are out of the scope of this article). So when you chat to your MP please mention this.
  • Leapfrog Honoring the GPL
  • A discussion on GPL compliance
    Among its many activities, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) is one of the few organizations that does any work on enforcing the GPL when other compliance efforts have failed. A suggestion by SFC executive director Karen Sandler to have a Q&A session about compliance and enforcement at this year's Kernel Summit led to a prolonged discussion, but not to such a session being added to the agenda. However, the co-located Linux Plumbers Conference set up a "birds of a feather" (BoF) session so that interested developers could hear more about the SFC's efforts, get their questions answered, and provide feedback. Sandler and SFC director of strategic initiatives Brett Smith hosted the discussion, which was quite well-attended—roughly 70 people were there at a 6pm BoF on November 3.
  • Join us as a member to give back for the free software you use
    At the FSF, we run our own infrastructure using only free software, which makes us stand out from nearly every other nonprofit organization. Virtually all others rely on outside providers and use a significant amount of nonfree software. With your support, we set an example proving that a nonprofit can follow best practices while running only free software.
  • The Free Software Foundation is in need of members

today's howtos