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Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why can’t Penguins enter Federica square?

Filed under
Linux
Web

stop.zona-m.net: In november 2010 I discovered the existence of Federica, the tridimensional virtual square” that should be the innovative web-learning system of the Federico II University in Naples.

Mind-Mapping Apps:

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: Mind mapping applications are a way to sort and outline the various pieces and steps of any particular process or problem. Related ideas are connected, creating a visual web of interrelated concepts. Mind mapping forces both the logical and the creative sides of your brain to work together.

13 Breathtaking Conky Configurations You Should See

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: Though we used to talk a lot about Ubuntu desktop eyecandy, Conky is something we never really discussed at all. Conky Ubuntu Lucid theme was the only exception, which is by far the most easy to install Conky theme I have ever used. So as to settle the Conky drought once and for all, here we feature one of the best collection of Conky configurations available.

KDE Second 4.6 Series Betas Preview New Kontact

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: KDE today announced the immediate availability of a second set of beta releases for the upcoming 4.6 series. These releases, codenamed Caramel, bring previews of new versions of the Plasma Desktop and Plasma Netbook workspaces.

SimplyMEPIS 11.0 Alpha TEST 4 Uploaded for Testing

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: Alpha 4 is available. This is a test release not a production release. The primary change since Alpha 3 is that the pre-configuration of video has been completely structured to take advantage of the auto-configuration capability of Xorg and NVIDIA.

Mageia Has an Official Logo

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: After months of careful consideration, lots of contributions, and a set process; the Mageia project has decided upon a logo.

Debian Project News - December 8th

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's seventeenth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include:

Updated Debian GNU/Linux: 5.0.7 released
Debian WWW Sprint
ZFS support in Squeeze
Interview with Debian Developer Colin Watson

Top 30 Most Popular Scientific and Engineering Packages

Filed under
Software

mynitor.com: I’ve come across 30 of the most popular Scientific and Engineering free and open source packages that students, scientists and programmers in the engineering field can greatly appreciate.

Linux kernel solid, but what will become of Novell contribution?

Filed under
Linux
SUSE
  • Linux kernel solid, but what will become of Novell contribution?
  • Who’s to Blame for the Linux Kernel?
  • Linux, Open Source & Ubuntu: Red Hat, Novell, IBM Among Top Contributors to Linux Development

KDE 4.6 Beta: Finding New Directions

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: KDE 4.6 will be slightly more ambitious than the last couple of releases. Judging from the recently-announced first beta, it will include the usual behind-the-scene enhancements, and additions of interest to developers. But it will also include some concrete improvements.

Making the Switch to Linux: Some Debian-based Recommendations

Filed under
Linux

igneousquill.net: Two years ago today my family made the switch from Windows to Ubuntu. This wasn't an overnight decision, and it wasn't without complications.

Has the Novell Deal Hampered openSUSE?

Filed under
SUSE

linuxjournal.com: Whether it was the uncertainty of openSUSE's future or in spite of it, there seems to have been a fire lit under openSUSE lately. On several fronts, the often controversial project has kicked into high gear.

OOPS - Root privileges under Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

7 Ways to Beautify Your KDE 4 Desktop

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: Like any good desktop environment, you are by no means stuck with the default look. In fact, KDE offers more easily customizable features than any other. What follows are 7 ways to get the desktop look you dreamed about when you were a child.

Linux without a command line. Is it possible?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com: I have to admit. I do like the command line which allows me to run commands quicker than any mouse happy click lover. However, many proponents of proprietary operating systems ridicule us Linux lovers for our command line commando ways and maintain that it is not possible to use Linux without having to write a command line or two.

Open Source Leader Matt Asay Leaves COO Position At Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: ZDNet reports, Matt is leaving his role at Canonical--as the man behind Ubuntu--behind to take a new gig at a startup called Strobe.

Also: Canonical Donates Server to KDE

LF Announces Certifications to Linux Standard Base 4.0 and Public Beta 4.1

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced that all the leading commercial Linux companies are certified to Linux Standard Base 4.0 (LSB 4.0), including Canonical, Kylin, Linpus, Mandriva, Neoshine, Novell, Oracle, Red Flag and Red Hat.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME 3 T-shirt Contest
  • Unity Linux 2010.02 Includes an Updated Branching Tool
  • Canonical Updates Landscape's Look
  • Emacs 30 Day Challenge Update #1: Writing this in Conkeror
  • I started working at Canonical today
  • TuxRadar Open Ballot: 2011 year of Linux on the desktop?
  • Introducing the $59 Linux Desktop Computer -- Userful MultiSeat
  • Getting Things GNOME - Useful Tool to Get Things Done
  • Free as in Freedom: Conference Behavior and Novell
  • Broadcom 802.11n support in b43
  • Unigine OilRush Linux Game Delayed To March 2011
  • Label & Card printing resources with TeX and LaTeX
  • Federal Government Adopting Open Source for Data Center Consolidation

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Wedding Photo Enhancement using The GIMP
  • How to find which process is eating RAM memory in Linux
  • Minitube - YouTube Desktop Application for Ubuntu
  • The Beginner’s Guide to Managing Users and Groups
  • Customizing KDE in Mandriva 2010.x
  • GMusicBrowser - Music Player and Manager
  • KernelCheck - Linux Kernel Compilation made easy
  • share files and printers with samba Linux for Windows
  • How to install www.nvidia.com drivers in Fedora 14
  • install YouAmp Music player in ubuntu using PPA
  • Crontab Scheduling Syntax and Script Example
  • Configure ufw firewall in Ubuntu using Gufw (GUI)
  • Blocking a Website with a iptables
  • Add a user-configurable menu to your Linux desktop with 9menu
  • 6 mv Command Examples to Move or Rename Linux File and Directory
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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses
    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (b) how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.
  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe
    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.
  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.
  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60
    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in. Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.
  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox
    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list. For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.
  • any.js
    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.
  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla
    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28
    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.
  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update
    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more