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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Should Governments switch to open source? Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 6:50pm
Story Canonical Builds Open Source Email App for Ubuntu Convergence Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 6:48pm
Story What are Chromebooks? And why you don’t need Windows any more… Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 6:27pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 5:29pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 5:28pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 5:27pm
Story Taking Red Hat Linux to the next level Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 5:12pm
Story Impoverished Haiti manufacturing its own Android tablet Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 9:25am
Story Computer access for the poorest, at $7 a head Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 9:06am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2014 - 8:50am

Linux Virus: A False Sense Of Security

Filed under
Security There seems to be a false sense of security among some Linux users. The number of malicious programs specifically written for GNU/Linux has been on the increase in recent years and in the year of 2005 alone has more than doubled: from 422 to 863.

Installation hell : StarOffice 9

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Software You might think that a company sending out review copies of their latest product would try to get everything right. Simple things like making it easy to install for instance, so that reviewers could get straight to what they should be looking at with the minimum of fuss. You might think that, but you'd be wrong.

German traffic lights powered by Linux and real-time Java

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Sci/Tech A major European vendor of city-wide traffic management systems is porting its flagship traffic light controller to Linux and real-time Java. Signalbau Huber says its Actros controller will better meet safety-critical requirements.

Review: PC-BSD 7.0.1

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BSD Today’s distro has been described as the Ubuntu of the BSD world. PC-BSD is an easy to use version of FreeBSD. FreeBSD is the behemoth in the BSD world and would probably have a much larger desktop presence if the BSDs hadn’t run into copyright and other proprietary problems right around when most of the GNU toolset was complete.

openSUSE Sports a New License (Ding dong, the EULA’s dead…)

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zonker.opensuse: Just in time for openSUSE 11.1 RC 1, we’ve finished the new and improved license for openSUSE 11.1. The days of agreeing to a EULA for openSUSE are over!

Fedora 10 proves infrastructure matter

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Linux Glancing at the features list for Fedora 10, at first you might be unimpressed. Many of the features are basically infrastructure improvements, fixing known problems and enhancing performance while laying the groundwork for future developments. However, infrastructure affects almost everything you do.

The complete Christmas shopper's guide to Linux-based netbook

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Hardware Give a gift of a netbook this year; I will be. These ultra-light computing devices are versatile, affordable and appealing. But which one to buy?

A future so bright Tux needs shades

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blogs.zdnet: Killer Penguin beer labelTo hear Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin tell it, the operating system war is over and Linux has won.

ReactOS; a free alternative to Windows

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aronzak.wordpress: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction is where ReactOS, what is essentially an attempt at a free Windows clone, derives its name. The project aims to be ‘binary compatible’ with Windows.

Why Migration Costs. Smoothing the way for software change.

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People often find it overwhelming when they start to use a new program like, or a new operating system like Linux. The software feels unfamiliar, tools and options aren’t where they are expected, favourite features are missing, and the experience leads to a sense of powerlessness.

Linux Music or The Ubuntu Shuffle

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Ubuntu It the spirit of change I decide to give Linux a chance at being my main OS. I have liked the idea of it for a long time. Linux has always struck me as cool and not the kind of hollow coolness those admen think up for Apple commercials.

Photo Management on Linux - Part 2

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Software When I am looking for a photo management program, I want one which meets most or all of the following requirements. So, working within these expectations, here are some of the programs that are available on Linux.

Book review: Linux System Programming

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Linux Many people make the mistake of thinking of Linux as just another Unix. Though most system calls are indeed identical, some of them aren’t. Knowing the difference is important. The book Linux System Programming provides complete overview of Linux system calls.

today's leftovers

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  • The GNOME Journal

  • Linux Outlaws 65 - Engage Crap Mode
  • My Thanksgiving/Holiday giveaway - Ubuntu
  • 5 things Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex cannot do
  • The Lazy System Administrator’s Way to Virtualize
  • Gentoo love / hate
  • Linux Has to Support Closed-Source Drivers
  • Reducing IT Costs with Linux
  • Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase II: This Time Its Personal
  • A great time to start an open source company
  • Death, Taxes, And Open Source Business Models
  • Linux powers free-to-air (FTA) satellite box
  • Open source within the firewall
  • Desktop Shells, Usability and Trackers. Oh My.
  • The Turkish Pardus Linux Distribution
  • Awesome bubble bobble clone, bubbros
  • hardinfo: A Linux Info and Synthetic Benchmark Collection
  • Free as in Freedom, Not Free as in Freeloader
  • about:mozilla
  • Linux shows staying power on Top500

some howtos:

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  • The 10 most useful Linux commands

  • Stop Compiz-Fusion From Loading Automatically
  • Python: Manipulate string or binary bytes with StringIO
  • Guide to Ubuntu Linux for Windows Users
  • Enable Medibuntu in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Less is more in modern X
  • 8 Ways to get help with Ubuntu Linux
  • Interrogating a Linux Machine
  • Cifs problem in Gentoo
  • TiddlyWiki derivatives help you get things done
  • Triple your audio volume in MPlayer
  • Quick And Easy Local Filesystem Troubleshooting For SUSE Linux
  • Testing the Linux Waters - Live CD vs Dual Boot
  • How to hide or protect folders in Ubuntu linux

Workrave: Useful or Useless?

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Software Workrave is a free and open source software application aimed at computer users who are suffering from occupational diseases such as Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Three applications for making disc labels

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Software Making labels for DVDs and their cases is an often overlooked task. Many discs are lucky to have some terse information quickly scrawled on them after burning. But there are some fine open source applications available for creating labels for CD-ROM and DVD disks and printing jewel case inserts.

little bit more fedora

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  • Fedora Screenshots

  • Video: Spotlight on Network Manager
  • Fedora does FIPS
  • Fedora 10 mini-review

The Samsung NC 10 Running Ubuntu Linux 8.10

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tuxvaio.blogspot: This little marvel runs Ubuntu 8.10 in very much the same way as the Aspire One runs on Hardy Heron. A couple of things need tweaking however.

Mozilla eyes extra beta for Firefox 3.1

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Moz/FF Mozilla Corp. will probably add a third beta to the development schedule for Firefox 3.1 to get a better handle on remaining bugs and give several new features.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.