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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story First Tizen phone now expected in India Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:57am
Story GNOME: 3.14 almost there Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:51am
Story City of Turin to move to open source desktops Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:32am
Story Ubuntu Touch RTM Preview – Ditching Android Just Got Easier Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 1:24am
Story Twitter engineer joins Mesosphere to push the open-source project he helped make Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:56am
Story [Wallpapers] Samsung Gear 2 / Gear 2 Neo and Galaxy Backgrounds Vol 26 Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:26am
Story MediaTek launches developer portal, debuts Android SDK Rianne Schestowitz 23/09/2014 - 12:04am
Story The skinny on thin Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:28pm
Story CipherShed: A replacement for TrueCrypt Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Red Hat CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing Rianne Schestowitz 22/09/2014 - 9:21pm

Mozilla sets Firefox 3.5 final release for Tuesday

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla sets Firefox 3.5 final release for Tuesday

  • Firefox 3.5 and the future of the web
  • Firefox Aims to Unplug Scripting Attacks
  • Ch-ch-ch-changes: A visual history of Firefox

As Dell and Acer Duke it Out, Their Open Source Stances Matter

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com/blog: For so many years, Taiwan-based Acer was an under-the-radar computer manufacturer. Although it has been the number three player, behind Hewlett-Packard and Dell, for a long time, even the company's previous business strategy tended to keep it anonymous. All that is changing now.

Never reboot again with Linux and Ksplice

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I usually have to reboot my Linux systems about once every six months. Linux is as stable as a rock. For some users even twice-a-year reboots is twice a year too often and that's where Ksplice comes in.

KDE's Kontact vs. GNOME's Evolution: Best Personal Info Manager?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: Personal information managers (PIM) are the major influence on most people's opinion of a desktop. When you launch an application, the desktop is simply something to move past as quickly as possibly.

10 mistakes new Linux administrators make

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’re new to Linux, a few common mistakes are likely to get you into trouble. Learn about them up front so you can avoid major problems as you become increasingly Linux-savvy.

15 years of FreeDOS

Filed under
OS

h-online.com: Originally released on the 28th of June 1994, FreeDOS is now 15 years old. FreeDOS is a free open source DOS clone. The current release, version 1.0, was released in early September of 2006 and is licensed under GPL.

Fedora: A Hat with a History

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Fedora is a giant among giants, in the shadow of a giant from which it was born. But every giant is born of humble beginnings.

10 Awesome Features of Krunner in KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

maketecheasier.com: Krunner operates independently of the Plasma desktop system as a standalone application. It includes a ton of features that make it useful beyond simple command launching.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 309

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Report: LinuxTag 2009

  • News: Updated kernel for "Lenny", Slackware install guide, Fedora 12 "Constantine", free articles by BSD Magazine
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 7 "x86_64", Tiny Core Linux 2.1, linuX-gamers Live 0.9.5
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.2 Milestone 3, Pardus Linux 2009 RC
  • New distributions: openArtist
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

EXT4, Btrfs, NILFS2 Performance Benchmarks

phoronix.com: The past few Linux kernel releases have brought a number of new file-systems to the Linux world. Being the benchmarking junkies that we are, we have set out to compare the file-system performance of EXT4, Btrfs, and NILFS2 under Ubuntu using the Linux 2.6.30 kernel.

Mozilla looking beyond Firefox 3.5

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Firefox 3.5 is not even out for general release yet, but Mozilla are already suggesting that the trunk builds of its successor are 20-30 per cent faster and will build on the company's work on video integration.

The netbook belongs to Linux

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Why do Microsoft and vendors like ASUS continue to push the line that Microsoft Windows is the ultimate operating system for the diminutive ultraportable netbook market?

Amarok 2.1: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

Filed under
Software

itnewstoday.com: When I first checked out Amarok 2.0 back when it made its debut, I didn’t think it could match up to Amarok 1.4.x in terms of usability or features. Now, I actually find myself preferring it to Amarok 1.4.x.

Is Red Hat a Takeover Target?

Filed under
Linux

kiplinger.com: What with Oracle CEO Larry Ellison showing a hefty appetite for enterprise software companies including those selling Open Source products the blogs and analyst ranks are buzzing with rumors that RedHat will get bought by Oracle. Or maybe by IBM as a defensive play? Or even possibly (gasp) by Microsoft?

Yakuake - Great Quake-Like Terminal Application for KDE4

Filed under
Reviews

A while ago I wrote an article called 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux, where I briefly reviewed all those popular shell-like applications and a few flavours of xterm or rxvt. In this article I will talk about Yakuake, a powerful terminal application for Linux, and also the KDE counterpart of Tilda in GNOME.

Eschalon Review - Commercial Role-Playing Game for Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Eschalon is a turn-based RPG (role-playing game), which tries to reproduce the feeling of classic RPG games. It's closed-source, available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, and it comes with a demo too. The full version is available as a download for $19.95.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Humorous Linux Posters - Part One

  • MS makes everybody happy
  • KOffice 2 Receives its First Update
  • FreeTumble 1.0 released
  • Music Slight of Hand
  • The pros and "conns" of Intel's ConnMan for Linux
  • New gentoo stuff, good stuff
  • Why is Ubuntu’s KDE 4 so bait – No really why?
  • My MacBook Pro (V5,3) And Gentoo Prefix
  • OLPC testing saturday && sugar on ubuntu
  • Mac4lin - Give that Mac OS X look to Linux
  • Why Oracle will continue to win
  • Five straightforward steps to vanquish Mono
  • Informercial Pitchman Billy Mays Dies at 50

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to listen to your music on hold, Asterisk

  • How to run KDE on Windows
  • Songbird addon for Ubuntu notification system
  • How to Completely Remove Mono on Ubuntu
  • Error Reporting in PHP
  • The Terminal: I/O Redirection
  • Fixing OpenDocument MIME magic on Linux
  • HOWTO : NTop on Ubuntu 9.04 Server
  • How to extract images from a word document using OpenOffice
  • Gentoo Openbox3 Configuration HOWTO
  • Mercurial, Apache, and OpenSuse 11.1

Is There a Perfect Linux Filesystem?

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Most often, when someone talks about a filesystem or file system, they're referring to disk filesystems such as NTFS, FAT, ext2, ext3, ext4, ISO 9660 and many others but can also refer to network file systems such as CIFS and NFS. But, is there a perfect filesystem?

GNOME 3.0 may have more Mono apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: The next major version of the GNOME desktop environment, version 3.0, may contain more than the one Mono-dependent application than it currently does, according to GNOME Foundation member Dave Neary.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Still at It

5 open source RSS feed readers

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds. And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too. Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use
    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive. In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat! Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.
  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity
    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.
  • Gammu 1.38.2
    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations. The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.
  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics
    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow. In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.
  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn
    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.
  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?
    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time. Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.
  • Open Source for Science + Innovation
    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.
  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners
    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.