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Tuesday, 06 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Brilliant scripting with Guile

Filed under
Linux

Guile isn't just another extension language: it's the official extension language of the GNU project. Guile makes Scheme embeddable, which makes the interpreter ideal for embedded scripting and more.

LCA2009: It's a Linux conference - but there's Macs aplenty

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: One thing that has been increasing exponentially at the Australian national Linux conference is that shiny, steel-grey laptop - or, at times, the sleek white one.

"In the Middle of Difficulty Lies Opportunity"

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxfoundation.org/blog-entry: Today's surprising news of 5,000 Microsoft jobs cut might be good news or bad for Linux, depending on how you look at it. As a Linux advocate, it's very easy to sit here and start spouting off that this is what Microsoft deserves, after running big and bloated for so long.

Does Windows 7 Threaten Mac OS and Linux?

Filed under
OS

earthweb.com: Does a good OS from Microsoft put the pressure back on Apple and the Linux development community? After all, both the Mac OS and Linux have benefitted from the fact that early adopters of Vista experienced declared the OS a lemon, with the worldwide market share in both OSes climbing significantly over the past couple of years.

The Netbook Newbie's Guide to Linux

Filed under
Linux

reghardware.co.uk: True to its name, a netbook makes a very decent ebook reader. Here's the freely-downloadable Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, complete with original Tenniel illustrations, as it appears on the MSI Wind:

Darwin at 200 and Linux at 20

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: This post is about things that look like other things but really are very different in origin and structure. For example desktop interfaces now look pretty similar to me.

LCA2009: Why ODF should be the chosen one

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: It is difficult to know whether Louis Suarez-Potts, community manager at OpenOffice.org, was conscious at any point today of the irony of criticising proprietary software while making a presentation using a MacBook.

Ext4 to be standard for Fedora 11, Btrfs also included

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: According to current plans, version 11 of Fedora, which is expected to arrive in late May, will use Ext4 as its standard file system. That's what the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo) recently decided, following a heated discussion in an IRC meeting.

Cloning Linux Systems With CloneZilla Server Edition (CloneZilla SE)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can clone Linux systems with CloneZilla SE. This is useful for copying one Linux installation to multiple computers without losing much time, e.g. in a classroom, or also for creating an image-based backup of a system.

Hidden Linux : More secure deletion tools

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Last time I introduced a couple of open source tools to securely delete files, folders or whole hard drives. Naturally Linux has more!

GNU/Linux races for Best Desktop

Filed under
Linux

norsetto.890m: La Repubblica, one of the two major Italian newspapers, has opened a competition for the most beautiful, original personal desktop.

How “Simplifying” Linux Just Made It Worse

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Some time after Linux netbook started appearing, it became obvious that there was a problem. Every time a new manufacturer gets in to the business, they try to build a completely custom Linux system that is “easier.”

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • do you believe in fate?

  • Gparted - Gnome Partition Editor in openSUSE
  • Using Linux to Leapfrog the Competition
  • VMware developers release GUI debugging tool for GTK+
  • Bringing Up Open Source, Part 2: The Consumer Side
  • Congratulations Mr President - Linux Australia goes to the vote
  • LCA2009: Sugar Labs tries to pick up the pieces
  • The Problems Facing Sugar Learning Platform
  • Building A OLPC Case From Spare Shampoo Bottles
  • Live from Down Under: Report from Linux.conf.au 2009
  • Why Ubuntu stays top of Distrowatch and Digg
  • Flock 64 Bit Browser on Linux (with 64-bit Flash support)
  • Firefox 3.1: Thanks For The Memory
  • Phoenix Strikes HyperSpace Deal With ASUS
  • Linux, Windows 7 Beta Could Be Hit By Downadup Worm
  • Linux Tells Us What’s Up (new version of ’sup’ tool!)
  • losing that Drupal lovin
  • Rar and Unrar for Fedora 10
  • Adding Wbar, Prism, and Gadgets to Ubuntu
  • Dropbox on 11.1
  • How To Move Your Server From Windows To Linux
  • 'Scroll animating' an image

Ubuntu's Shuttleworth praises Windows 7, welcomes fight

Filed under
Microsoft
Interviews
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: Speaking with The Reg, the founder of popular Linux distro Ubuntu and chief executive of Canonical called Windows 7 a great operating system.

Linux video converter is now available

Filed under
Software

rudd-o.com: True to its flexible and capable roots, Linux has a ton of ways to convert videos, with multiple competing projects all featuring astounding capabilities. Regrettably, they all are either command-line programs or very, very complicated. Until today.

Using Web Data to Determine the Most Popular Linux Flavor

Filed under
Linux

zmogo.com: There’s a lot of talk around the internets about which (free) Linux distro is the ‘best.’ And while this article won’t opine either way, I do hope to put some perspective on the Linux debate using public data.

Open source identity: Linux founder Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

computerworld.com.au: Linus Torvalds is a regular visitor to Australia in January. He took some time out to speak to Rodney Gedda about a host of topics including point releases, filesystems and what it is like switching to GNOME. He also puts Windows 7 in perspective.

Careers In Linux Journalism-- No Knowledge Required!

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxtoday.com/blog: I am pointing at all the alleged journalists, reporters, and so-called analysts who write about Linux and FOSS when they don't know one single blinking thing about it. What is it with people?

SuSE 11.1 - too little, too soon

Filed under
SUSE

genietvanhetleven.blogspot: I have given SuSE 11.1 due diligence. I have spent at least a day with each of the problem areas, some with success, others without. As a result I have come to the following conclusion: There are a lot of things that just don't work.

Don't Fear the Penguin: A Newbie's Guide to Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: Getting started with Linux can be an intimidating task, particularly for people who have never tried any operating system besides Windows. In truth, however, very little about Linux is actually difficult to use. It's simply a different OS, with its own approach to doing things.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

Linux Devices

  • This week in vc4 (2016-12-05): SDTV, 3DMMES, HDMI audio, DSI
    The Raspberry Pi Foundation recently started contracting with Free Electrons to give me some support on the display side of the stack. Last week I got to review and release their first big piece of work: Boris Brezillon's code for SDTV support. I had suggested that we use this as the first project because it should have been small and self contained. It ended up that we had some clock bugs Boris had to fix, and a bug in my core VC4 CRTC code, but he got a working patch series together shockingly quickly. He did one respin for a couple more fixes once I had tested it, and it's now out on the list waiting for devicetree maintainer review. If nothing goes wrong, we should have composite out support in 4.11 (we're probably a week late for 4.10).
  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Driver Work On SDTV, HDMI Audio & More
    Eric Anholt's latest weekly blog post on the VC4 development highlights SDTV support coming together, the Raspberry Pi Foundation contracting Free Electrons to provide more development help on the display stack, HDMI audio support for VC4 DRM driver continuing to inch along, DSI fixes, some code generation improvements for VC4 Gallium3D, and other work.
  • Rugged Skylake embedded PC has wide range power
    Axiomtek’s “eBOX565-500-FL” computer runs Linux or Windows on dual-core Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offers four USB 3.0 ports and wide-range power. The eBOX565-500-FL updates the two-year-old eBOX560-880-FL embedded PC, which provides dual-core Intel 4th Gen “Haswell” Core and Celeron CPUs. The very similar eBOX565-500-FL instead taps the 14nm Intel 6th Gen “Skylake” ULT processors, once again offering two dual-core options: the 2.4GHz Core i5-6300U and the 2.0GHz Celeron 3955U.

Servers/Networks

  • Docker acquires file syncing and sharing app Infinit, will open-source the software
    Docker, the startup that pushes open source software for packaging up code into containers that can be deployed on many machines, today announced its latest acquisition: file transfer app Infinit. Yes, that’s right, Docker bought a company with a consumer-friendly app. It lets you sync files to your other devices or send them to others.
  • How Virtualized Networks Will Save Us From Dropped Calls
    We’ve all been the victim of a dropped mobile phone call and know how frustrating it can be. However, virtualized networks provide network operators with powerful tools to detect and recover from network disruptions, or “faults,” that can drop calls for thousands of subscribers simultaneously. The Open Platform for Network Functions Virtualization (OPNFV) project together with OpenStack have developed features in software that add resiliency to mobile networks and enable them to recover from network and other outages.
  • It’s Brexploitation! Microsoft punishes UK for Brexit with cloud price-gouging
    “My own story would not have been possible but for the democratizing force of Microsoft technology reaching me where I was growing up,” CEO Satya Nadella told shareholders this week. But the price of that “democratizing force” is about to go up, with Britons uniquely singled out. Microsoft has reiterated to Azure customers that prices will go up by 22 per cent from January 1st. The problem? The price rise is far greater than any exchange rate post-Brexit fluctuations might justify. Microsoft’s biggest European data centre is in Dublin, a member of the Euro currency. The Euro hovered around €1.28 to one pound for the first six months of the year, before crashing after Brexit. It’s now €1.19, a depreciation of just 9 cents, or 7 per cent. The value of the British pound has weakened more dramatically against the US dollar, dropping by 18.9 per cent since 24 June - the day after Brits voted to leave the EU. For new Office or Azure cloud customers in the UK, no exchange rate can justify any price rise at all. In September, Microsoft made Azure available in UK data centres.

Android Leftovers