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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The GNOME Shell Challenge Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:12am
Story Fedora 21 may come with Gnome 3.14, Gnome 3.13.3 released with major improvements Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:10am
Story Elive 2.3.0 Beta and Webconverger 25 Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:10am
Story Valve Has Greenlit 36 More Linux Games For Steam Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:08am
Story Telegram Connection Manager (Still Under Development) Will Bring Telegram Support To Telepathy, Empathy And Other Multi-Protocol IM Clients Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:07am
Story Wallen on KDE, Quiet Revolution, and Ryan Gordon on Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 4:06am
Story Free software for healthcare facilities in need Rianne Schestowitz 28/06/2014 - 2:31am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 9:31pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 9:31pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 9:29pm

Blind leading the blind

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the problems many veteran users have with the rise of Ubuntu is how message boards and communities get polluted with the clueless new users. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with looking for a little help or offering some of your own knowledge. But the old adage holds water; one can know just enough to cause trouble.

My dog is more Linux than your dog

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Is there really a way for any one distro to be "more Linux' than another? Possibly the answer is yes and no, right down the middle.

We Won't Leave You Behind...

Filed under
KDE

christian-loose.de: Although the future belongs to newer application launchers like Kickoff, Lancelot or Raptor, some users prefer the old K Menu style.

ATI Linux Drivers Gain Support For Unreleased RS880

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: AMD's current flagship offering when it comes to integrated ATI graphics is the Radeon HD 3300 / 790GX. As something new for consumers to consider, soon it looks like AMD will be introducing the RS880.

Arduino hardware hacking: Part 1

Filed under
Hardware

tuxradar.com: Arduino is cool. It's cool because it's a tiny device - about three inches by two inches - that comes with a USB port and a programmable chip. It's cool because you can program it using a very simple programming language known as Wiring.

THREE reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3

Filed under
OOo

collinpark.blogspot: OK, here are three reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3 if you're still using 2.x

Six Latest Firefox Addons You Should Check Out

Filed under
Moz/FF

killertechtips.com: We all love Firefox for the sheer number of extensions that can be added to it. There are plenty of brilliant yet unpopular extensions that have been written about before.

Move over Tux; it's time for Tuz the Tassie Devil

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Ever socially aware, Linux has a new mascot for a short while. Tuz will instead embrace the boot screen of many a distro in kernel 2.6.29.

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Review - OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
Reviews

I decided to install OpenSUSE this weekend onto my new Maxtor 4 USB hard drive. I've used the live CD before with KDE 4.1, but didn't like not having the option to have different backgrounds on the multiple desktops. Supposedly, this option and others will be available in KDE 4.2. So, instead of waiting, I decided to install KDE 3.5.10. Here's how it went.....

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Arch Linux Review

  • A PCLinuxOS 2009.1 userbar
  • SAM-Linux, PCLinuxOS' Ugly Duckling?
  • pwn2own confusion
  • Installing Linux on my girfriend’s laptop: an overview
  • Digest of Enlightenment 17 Dimensions
  • FLOSS Weekly 61: Arduino
  • Linux
  • A Working X Input 2 Implementation
  • Programming for Kids with Basic-256 on Ubuntu
  • why I chose openSuSE again and howto make updates faster

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Easily Get free newsgroup access over ipv6 in Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu: Picviz 0.5 Installation
  • How To Configure PXE Boot on CentOS 5
  • How to set up a web server with Apache
  • TV-Browser - A Digital TV Guide in openSUSE
  • Fixing High Latency with KDE4 - Display Flickering - Freezing Videos
  • Get system specs in Linux
  • Domainkeys/Dkim with Postfix (quick way)
  • Mplayer on Gentoo with VDPAU
  • Configure BIND 9 For IPv4 (or IPv6) Only

2009 and still in fear of using new hardware in GNU/Linux!

Filed under
Linux

When the GNU/Linux revolution started reaching the masses, around 2000, I predicted that by 2010 there would be full vendor support for the free operating system. Well, it’s 2009, and I have to admit it — I am feeling nervous. Read the full article at Freesoftware Magazine.

Get prepared for the inevitable with automated backups

Filed under
Linux

No excuses: do-it-yourself, secure, distributed network backups made easy

My Distro Is Better Than Yours…. Not!

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I read a lot of news feeds. Sometimes too many. I admit it. About 10% of what I read is new. The most tiresome ones have to be the my-distro-is-better-than-yours. Only slightly less tiresome are the Linux vs. Windows ones.

Fedora 10 goes Minstrel, wifi users rejoice

Filed under
Software

izanbardprince.wordpress: If you’re getting erratic wifi performance in your favorite Linux distribution, no it is not just you, the old algorithm was actually quite bad. Enter Minstrel.

Distro Review: Debian Lenny

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org/blog: Ok it’s time for another distro review and I’m a bit overdue with this one but I’m a big fan of Debian and when I reviewed Etch (4.0) last year I declared that if I were to finally grow up and settle down with just one distro this would be the one.

RMS "Broke into Microsoft and Stole Software"...

opendotdotdot.blogspot: ...that, at least, is what this deranged story in the Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper claims.

Linux Netbooks - Cheap is good

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: The Linux Netbooks are cheap, simple and small — just apt for performing the basic tasks. The future for this next wave of personal technology gadgets is simple as it doesn’t burn a hole in your pocket and has portability advantages.

More on the Ubuntu Jaunty Notifications Crapfest

Filed under
Ubuntu

izanbardprince.wordpress: I mentioned earlier that I had some objections to this new “Indicator” crapplet in Ubuntu Jaunty, I view it as a kind of foistware that has nothing to do with the system.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?