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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 23 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Valve Forgot That It's Launching Steam Machines on November 10 Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 3:44pm
Story Underneath the Red Hat Microsoft Deal, Bodhi is Five Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 3:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 3:02pm
Story Fedora Workstation 23 and LibreOffice Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 2:21pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 2:07pm
Story Education is key to Basque free software policy Roy Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 2:01pm
Story A look at how MongoDB plans to make open source profitable Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 12:37pm
Story Why improving kernel security is important Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 12:19pm
Story BlackBerry Priv Review: BlackBerry May Win You Back With Android Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 12:11pm
Story CAINE 7 released: Screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 06/11/2015 - 7:19am

yesterday's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Revisited: 3 Newbie-Friendly KDE Distributions
  • Hacking, Old-School
  • So long, Drupal 5.x (End of Life Announcement)
  • How to Install VirtualBox 4.0.2 on Ubuntu 10.10
  • Easily Search And Manage PPAs With Y PPA Manager
  • There's No FUD Like an Old FUD
  • Installing a Debian GNU/Linux test server with VirtualBox
  • Expect Script Tutorial: Expressions, If Conditions, For Loop, and While Loop
  • How to make a great pattern in GIMP
  • Creating dynamic volumes with loop devices
  • How to Advertise your FOSS game
  • Add titles to OpenShot Video Editor projects
  • MySQL: Drive Your Performance Problems Away!
  • Diff with vimdiff
  • Text Watermarking and Watermark Recovery - Snowdrop
  • MintCast Interview
  • Radio Tray 0.6.2 comes with resume parameter, application indicator
  • Stuck in Windows
  • Moving duplicity (and Deja-Dup) backups
  • Ubuntu Laptop How to save current screen brightness settings
  • Search is One of the Strengths of GNU/Linux
  • Shadow Clones is a Fun Alien Shooter with Nice Soundtrack
  • Use the Levels Adjustment Tool in digiKam

Icinga (Monitoring Solution) Installation And Configuration On CentOS

Filed under
HowTos

Icinga is an enterprise grade open source monitoring system which keeps watch over networks and any conceivable network resource, notifies the user of errors and recoveries and generates performance data for reporting. Scalable and extensible, Icinga can monitor complex, large environments across dispersed locations.

There's No Such Thing As Web Standards

Filed under
Software
Web
  • The Truth Comes Out: There's No Such Thing As Web Standards
  • HTML Versioning Eliminated

Introducing Andreas

Filed under
Software

press.redhat.com: Red Hat provides an industry-leading support experience for thousands of open source applications and solutions. An exciting addition to Red Hat’s Support delivery capabilities is a new fault detection framework, Andrea.

Why would anyone use vim?

Filed under
Software

mikethecoder.com: I recently switched to vim full time after years of asking myself that question. It seemed like a huge percentage of the better hackers I came across used vim, but all I could see was “no mouse, no IDE goodies, no deal.” Why would anyone subject themselves to that? Here's why:

XPlanetFX - Incredible Tool for Rendering Real Time Earth Wallpaper in Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: XPlanetFX is an incredible tool for rendering high quality real time earth wallpaper in Ubuntu. XplanetFX comes with a handy GTK interface which makes things a whole lot simpler.

5 open source security projects to watch

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: With network and software vulnerabilities growing at a perpetual rate, good security software can help defend against many of the large-scale threats that occur locally and from all over the Internet.

Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) 6 Released

Filed under
Software

linux-magazine.com: Kevin Fenzi, one of release-engineers for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) and long time member of the EPEL Fedora Special Interest Group (SIG) discusses the EPEL 6 release.

Mutter: window and compositing manager for GNOME 3

Filed under
Software

ubuntulandforever.blogspot: GNOME 3 is the GNOME project's ambitious effort to take its desktop into the future. A key component of the desktop is the window manager, which defines much of the overall feel of the system.

Development of FFmpeg under new management

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: With over 100 audio and video formats, FFmpeg is at the heart of countless multimedia programs, and it is one of the show-piece projects on the open source scene. Originally founded by Fabrice Bellard, Michael Niedermayer started maintaining the project in 2004. However, a team of 18 developers has now ousted him.

Looking Forward to

Debian 6
14% (268 votes)
Fedora 15
6% (115 votes)
openSUSE 11.4
17% (312 votes)
Mandriva 2011
5% (85 votes)
PCLOS 2011
16% (304 votes)
Ubuntu 11.04
17% (322 votes)
SimplyMepis 11.0
2% (32 votes)
Arch 2011.x
5% (100 votes)
Puppy 5.x/X.x
1% (25 votes)
Mint 11 / LMDE 2011xx
11% (199 votes)
Other
6% (106 votes)
Total votes: 1868

Home Computer - Green, Palm Sized Computer For Rs 5000

Filed under
Hardware

linuxhelp.blogspot: elLoka Techsolutions Pvt Ltd a Hyderabad based product design and manufacturing company that delivers Ultra Low Cost Computer Platforms(ULCCP), has come up with a palm-sized computer that is very cheap and consumes very little power.

Linux lovers riled up over Sony PS3 lawsuit, Firefox woes

linuxfordevices.com: The Linux blogosphere is "all shook up" these days, skewering Sony for suing a hacker for jailbreaking the PS3, and hammering Mozilla for skimping on hardware acceleration in the Linux Firefox 4 beta. Meanwhile, Google's decision to drop H.264 from its Chrome browser for open source alternatives received praise from the open source world, but also a surprising amount of criticism.

LibreOffice 3.3 Release Candidate 4 available

Filed under
LibO

libreoffice.org: The Document Foundation is happy to announce the fourth release candidate of LibreOffice 3.3.

Linux time... again

Filed under
Linux

proji.co.uk/blogs: I've written previously about my past experimentation with various Linux distros. In fact I've been an on / off linux user for about 10 years now. In that time I've seen much change and a huge leap in the evolution of Linux as an operating system. It's been fascinating watching how the different distros have branched out.

Everything you need to know about Linux.conf.au 2011

Filed under
Linux

omgubuntu.co.uk: I’m sure you’ve heard about it, but do you really know what it is, why it exists and why you should care?

Getting Enlightened with Bodhi Linux

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: In our recent discussion about Ubuntu Remixes, there were a few names that kept popping up in the comments. One of them was a distro mostly unknown to MTE but immediately of interest, and that’s Bodhi Linux. With an Ubuntu base it’s got a solid core behind it, but the real kicker is the Enlightenment (E17) desktop.

5 Operating Systems Starting 2011 With a Bang

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: 2011 has only just begun, and already there is plenty going on in the world of OS software. From Apple OS X Lion to Microsoft Windows 8, here are the top 5 noteworthy OS developments.

When "open source" software isn't truly open source

Filed under
OSS

techrepublic.com: Free Software is a term that both promotes Stallman’s ideological goals regarding how software is distributed, thus turning off business-oriented software users who disagree with Stallman’s ideology, and manages to conflate itself with software that simply doesn’t cost anything.

Ubuntu Unity 2D Support

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Unity Adds 2D Support in Daily Builds
  • Ubuntu 11.04 switches to LibreOffice in latest daily builds
  • Ubuntu Business Model – A Misunderstood Concept
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal - First Impressions
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Zuul: Proven open-source continuous integration/continuous delivery

If you think Zuul is the Gatekeeper, demigod, and minion of the ancient Hittite god Gozer, then you're a Ghostbusters fan, too. But, if you're interested in continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and not "human sacrifice, dogs, and cats living together... mass hysteria," then you want Zuul, OpenStack's open-source CI/CD platform. Zuul originally was developed for OpenStack CI testing. For years, OpenStack, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, got all the attention. Over time, people began to realize that as impressive as OpenStack was, the CI system behind it, which enabled contributors and users across many different organizations to work and develop quickly together across multiple projects, was impressive in its own right. Read more

Smallest RK3399 hacker board yet ships at $129 with 4GB DDR4

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today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".

Programming: GNU Parallel, Rust, Go