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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 29 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Medical Device dev platform runs Linux on DaVinci SoC Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2014 - 7:32am
Story Rackspace opens the door wide for open-source development Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 8:04pm
Story MINIX 3 Successfully Ported To ARM Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 7:53pm
Story GNOME Software App Allows You to Install Local Packages Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Linux 3.14 To Make AMD R600/700 OpenGL GS Possible Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 7:34pm
Story Can Android Challenge Embedded Linux? Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 7:11pm
Story Picking a Flavor of Linux Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Mozilla Previews New Firefox Launcher for Android Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 6:33pm
Story Moto G goes on sale on Flipkart starting Rs. 12,499 Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 6:17pm
Story Hosting Providers Know A Real OS When They See One Rianne Schestowitz 06/02/2014 - 6:08pm

Quick Look at KDE 4.2-SVN

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux.org: As the work on KDE 4.2 turns out to be on quite an advanced stage, I’ve decided to test the current development version. For the purpose of this test I used the Archlinux distribution, that features the KDE 4.2-SVN packages repository.

Dillo-2.0 has been released

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: The eight-year-old Dillo project has released version 2.0 of its Linux-compatible, ultra-lightweight HTML browser for embedded systems, antiquated PCs, and other low-powered devices.

Zenwalk: Slackware's Moment of Zen

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Periodically, Linux media outlets go on list frenzies -- Ten Linux Distros for New Users, Five Great Distributions You've Never Heard Of. These are interesting lists but always seem to feature the same distributions. I wonder why Zenwalk is rarely mentioned.

I love Ubuntu, and here is why

Filed under
Ubuntu

kyleabaker.com: I love Ubuntu for many reasons. Several of them involve the fact that Ubuntu is open source (but Linux in general is that way) while others involve the fact that Ubuntu is striving for a certain aesthetically pleasing appearance that Apple has managed to control for so long.

The five best things in Linux 2.6.27

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Does anyone really know what will be better in Windows 7? I don't. With Linux, on the other hand, we know exactly what we're getting well in advance of its arrival. In this latest Linux kernel, I see several outstanding new features.

Three Cool 3D Car Racing Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: My 3 year old son is addicted to race cars, so I decided to look for some 3D racing games that can be played natively under Linux. Unfortunately, I only found quite a few. But since some of you are probably desperately searching for some decent racing games for your Linux box, I will share.

Why FreeBSD Is My Favorite *nix OS

Filed under
BSD

webmastersbydesign.com: FreeBSD provides a very easy installation process. FreeBSD is one of the most secure operating systems available. The port system is a collection of software that is packaged and ready for installation on a FreeBSD system.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta3 Delayed

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: openSUSE 11.1 beta 3 will be delayed by several days. We originally scheduled the release for today (October 16) but the power outage last Friday left us unable to check in packages temporarily, and pushed the schedule back by several days.

iPlayer downloads coming to Mac and Linux

techradar.com: The BBC has sorted out a deal with Adobe that will allow both Linux and Mac users to download content from its iPlayer.

Blender 2.48: It isn't all about play

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Blender 2.48 is the latest version of the the open source Blender 3D suite to be released by the Blender Foundation. The suite is designed to allow users to model, render and animate 3D scenes.

10 Simple Methods for Happily Running Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Switching to Linux. We are either talking about it or simply telling people to do it. Yet despite this all this "action," it seems that we have somehow forgotten to include the "how" when it comes to this life changing switch.

The State of Linux Docks

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: Almost every linux docks, one way or another, exists to mimic the functions of Mac OS X docks. The Linux purists dislike docks because of its similarities with OS X the same way some of them dislike KDE3 and earlier KDE versions, for its similarities to Windows OS.

The Forecast Looks Good for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

computerworlduk.com: As well as the stampede to the servers, what's noteworthy is the split by platform: around 79% of downloads are for Windows. That's good news, I think.

Breaking Up With Bill

Filed under
Linux

cdotraffic.wordpress: I’m having an affair. Unlike other relationships that you move heaven and earth for to keep I am not frozen by guilt or remorse to destroy mine.

Finance Ministry of Latvia: Considering Open Source

Filed under
OSS

baltic-course.com: Gradual transition to open source software at government institutions is a proposal that should be given serious consideration, stressed the Finance Ministry of Latvia.

Ubuntu Server Edition: GUI Or No GUI, And Does It Matter?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: There’s been a lot of ink spilled—er, pixels fired—about Canonical’s decision not to offer a graphical interface in the server edition. The debate is understandable.

Five Ways to Keep Up With Linux

Filed under
Linux

enterprisenetworkingplanet.com: Keeping up with Linux is a time-consuming endeavor. Linux is frequently changing, and it’s so large and widely-used that it is nearly impossible to keep up with all the evolution. In this article, we’ll show you five ways.

The Perfect Server - Mandriva 2009.0 Free (i386)

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a Mandriva 2009.0 Free server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Finding Which RPM Package Contains a File

  • E17 adapted to Linux devices, demo'd on Treo650
  • Red Hat: Crisis to boost open source
  • Dell and Canonical Ubuntu continue groundbreaking Linux work
  • LSB 4 For Whom?
  • Best Music Player For Ubuntu - Exaile?
  • Review of final OpenOffice 3: Why buy Microsoft Office?
  • Open source gets pragmatic
  • UVD Is Enabled For Linux In Catalyst 8.10
  • And you thought Microsoft's open source FUD was bad
  • Analysis: netbooks a challenge and opportunity for Linux
  • Two Great Linux Systems Under $300 Dollars
  • Windows XP - PCLinuxOS Dual Boot Saves the Day
  • Having fun with a book on Ubuntu LPI 199
  • The Tao of Linux
  • 2008 has been very very good for the Linux Foundation
  • Mozilla Ubiquity - the Web-integrated YOU
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Coming Soon
  • Migrating to (Embedded) Linux: How and Why
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More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more