Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Linux Setup - Mike Saunders, Linux Voice Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:11pm
Story Linux Kernel 3.12.5 Is Now Available for Download Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:07pm
Story YotaPhone. Always-on dual screen, thicker than most, but not by much Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:04pm
Story Open source for homeschooling or supplementing your child's education Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:03pm
Story CentOS 6.5 Review – Red Hat for all Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 7:58pm
Story Linux Mint 16 Petra, hands-on: Installing the Cinnamon, MATE, KDE and Xfce versions Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 1:34pm
Story Xen PVH Support Brought Back Up For The Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:51am
Story Valve Set To Debut SteamOS Linux Today Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 8:43am
Story Linux — La Casa Nostra Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2013 - 12:54am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2013 - 6:05pm

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 (Linux)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: Dell barges into the netbook market with its sleek, configurable, and solid performing Inspiron Mini 9, but it’s not without flaws.

Ubuntu documentation in shreds

Filed under
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: An ambitious plan to smarten up the online documentation for Linux distro Ubuntu has ended in failure. Dubbed the Summer of Documentation by the Ubuntu forums beginner team who devised the plan back in June, the goal was to clean up the Ubuntu Community Wiki.

Windows Guy Tries Open Suse 11

Filed under
SUSE

10minutetech.net: I’m a Windows Guy. I’ve wanted to see if I could walk on the Linux side for a while now. I wanted to see if I could really switch over and do all the things I need to do easily. So I decided to give it a try.

My first Linux laptop is the Asus EeePC netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Dana Blankenhorn: My first Linux laptop is the ASUS EeePC. This is a sweet machine in many ways. But if you’re a touch typist this is going to hurt.

Linux in U.S. Schools: Why the Resistance?

Filed under
Linux

Matt Hartley: "Software alternatives are just not available for Linux.”
I hear the statement above almost everyday. What makes the statement so ridiculous is that it is completely inaccurate 99 percent of the time. When I hear this coming from schools...I find myself shaking my head in complete disbelief.

Open Source Software: Your Company's Legal Risks

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: Open source software is a convenient way for developers to build solutions. However, if your company plans to distribute that software, a recent ruling makes it clear that failing to follow the open source license could put you in jeopardy of a copyright claim, according to Michael P. Bennett and Katherine K. Ivers of the Wildman Harrold law firm.

Gallium3D Update, 2D Support Coming?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: During FOSDEM this year, Keith Whitwell had provided a status update on Gallium3D and where they were at as of February. However, a lot has changed since then.

Red Hat acquires way into Windows game

Filed under
Linux

news.cnet.com: Just four days after Red Hat closed its second quarter, the company has announced the acquisition of Qumranet, an open-source virtualization company, positioning the open-source leader to close many more successful quarters to come.

Asus and MSI head to head

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

So what we have for this subjective head-to-head is a Win XP-based MSI Wind and a Linux-based eeePC 1000, both sporting 1GB of RAM. The different platforms mean that we could not a perform a true 'apples with apples' comparison, though the fact that both machines are essentially the same.

Also: HP 2133 Mini-Note PC Video Review

Two Years at Canonical Going Strong

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Two years ago today I came to work at Canonical as the Ubuntu Community Manager. When I started at Canonical, it was just me working with Mark to define my role and focus and to determine what I wanted to do to help grow and facilitate our stunning community. Since then I have become part of the wider Ubuntu team.

Mandriva Linux 2009 RC1 is available

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: Mandriva Linux 2009 Release Candidate 1 (code name camelopard) is available on public mirrors now (or will be in the coming hours).

Why Linux won the popularity contest and FreeBSD didn’t

Filed under
Linux

hitechsquad.com: There are several fully functional and stable Open Source operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, OpenSolaris, NetBSD, OpenBSD and so on. So the question is why has Linux won the popularity contest?

If You Knew Cash Like GnuCash Knows Cash

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: One of the final frontiers for users, and open source programmers, is the dark realm of the financial application. GnuCash fills the void of a financial package for Linux users but GnuCash, contrary to what some believe, will not replace Quickbooks although it does have some very advanced features.

Display your geolocation data with Viking

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Viking is an open source application that allows you to import and edit your Global Positioning System (GPS) points of interest and tracks. It can overlay the points and tracks on your choice of Google Maps, Terraserver, OpenStreetMap, or NASA's BlueMarble map tiles so you can see what you are doing.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Available Now

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: Inside is an Intel Atom Diamondville processor and it has a 1024x600 LED-backlit screen with 4, 8 and 16GB SSD options and about three hours of battery life. Only the Windows XP version is available now for $399, in black or white—the $349 Ubuntu flavor, along with the rest of the six-color rainbow are a few weeks away.

Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux Tops 8 Million Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Sure, Windows is expected to run on 1 billion devices by 2010. But a loud minority is making its voice heard by moving to Ubuntu Linux. In fact, Canonical’s marketing materials state that Ubuntu now has more than 8 million users.

Chrome being polished for Mac and Linux

Filed under
Google

pcpro.co.uk: Google has revealed that it is "actively working" on bringing its Chrome browser to Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. Writing on its Mac development blog, the company claims that Mac and Linux engineers joined the team early in the process.

ZaReason (and Other Independents) Outshine the Big Boys

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blog.linuxtoday: Dell, ASUS, Acer, and all the other bandwagoning coattail riders are getting all the headlines for selling desktop Linux preinstalls, especially on this new netbook wave. But let's not forget that these bandwagoning coattail-riding party-crashers are very late to the party.

Amazon to Sell OLPC XO Laptops From November

Filed under
OLPC

pcworld.com: Amazon.com will start selling One Laptop Per Child's low-cost XO notebook computer as part of the Give One, Get One program OLPC developed last year, according to an official from OLPC.

Also: Sugar openSUSE live

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more