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Wednesday, 28 Jan 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Poulsbo mess casts a shadow on Intel's Moblin project srlinuxx 1 12/12/2009 - 9:54am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 12/12/2009 - 4:14am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 12/12/2009 - 2:40am
Story Fedora 12 – A Popular Linux Distro You Might Want To Try srlinuxx 12/12/2009 - 12:43am
Story What Will Happen To xf86-video-nv In 2010? srlinuxx 12/12/2009 - 12:40am
Story Yes, I Guess We Linux Fools Are Pretty Weird srlinuxx 12/12/2009 - 12:36am
Story Firefox add-on store srlinuxx 11/12/2009 - 10:34pm
Story Fedora, open source trademarks and FUD srlinuxx 11/12/2009 - 10:32pm
Story JooJoo Linux-based Tablet PC Unleashed srlinuxx 3 11/12/2009 - 9:12pm
Story What will Ubuntu 10.04 bring to the table? srlinuxx 1 11/12/2009 - 9:00pm

Novell offering some great prizes for helping out Linux and OSS

Filed under
SUSE

Have you helped push Linux and open source forward? Put yourself on the map, and win hot prizes. If you’ve helped develop, test, promote, or evangelize Linux and open source, we’d love to hear from you. So stand up and let us see where you are.

Free Open Document label templates

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve ever spent hours at work doing mailings, cursed your printer for printing outside the lines on your labels, or moaned “There has got to be a better way to do this,” here’s the solution you’ve been looking for. Working smarter, not harder, with the OpenOffice label templates will save you time, effort, and (if you want) make really cool-looking labels.

Make your intranet more productive with XAMPP

Filed under
HowTos

A phenomenal amount of information is being managed by open source content management systems (CMS), wikis, and blogs. However, most of these content management systems work on the popular but difficult to configure LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) stack, which makes setting up one fall within an administrator's domain. You can simplify your hosting tasks by turning to XAMPP, a full-featured Apache, MySQL, PHP, and Perl stack that works on Linux, Windows, Mac OS X, and Solaris. It can give you a fully integrated server environment within minutes.

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Opensource Bandwidth,Network and Servers Monitoring tools with Tutorials

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

This is very good tutorial for bandwidth monitoring, network monitoring and servers monitoring tools with clear step by step installation guides. This includes Nagios, MRTG, RTG, Netmrg, Darkstat, monit, munin, mon, oreon, Saidar, Cacti, Bigsister, ibmonitor, and zabbix. This resource is very useful for Users and Administrators to monitor their networks, bandwidth, and servers.

The ongoing MythTV saga continues

Filed under
Software

I have good news, bad news, and worse news. The good news is that I managed to get MythTV working well enough that it now plays standard definition channels better than the cable box alone, even though it's getting its signal from the cable output of the cable box. I get this benefit because MythTV allows me to tweak various parameters that you can't change on the cable box.

Integrator Goes Back To School With Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

Hargadon Computer will get a lot busier in about three weeks, after kids are back in school and teachers and school administrators realize they need to do something with their outdated classroom PCs.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a - The Full Monty

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
-s

The PCLinuxOS 0.93a Full Edition was quietly released yesterday and is the equivalent of PCLinuxOS releases of the past several years. They have recently been releasing scaled down versions to accomodate other tastes and desires, but many folks were looking and waiting for the fully loaded edition. Weighing in at 685 MB, Texstar referred it as the "Full Monty." Its code name has been "Big Daddy." Whatever the name, I think you'll call it home.

Puppy Linux celebrates its success

Filed under
Linux

The Puppy Linux team has organized a "Media Fiesta" to recognize innovations within the mini distribution. The interactive, web-based confab is intended to bring professional Linux developers, intermediate-to-high ability users, and newbies together to share information and tips for using the distro and developing new applications.

GP2X Review

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Everyone has heard of the Nintendo DS and Sony PSP, but less will have heard of the GP2X, the latest portable console to come from Gamepark Holdings (GPH) in Korea. Unlike its mainstream competitors the GP2X is aimed at giving the gamer far more freedom than they could ever expect from the likes of Nintendo and Sony. The community-friendly GP2X uses a Linux-based operating system, providing a framework for you to do activities typically associated with desktop computing, such as playing emulators, view photos, listen to music and watch videos. It currently has very few commercial games but the home-brew scene is going strong.

Kickoff Start Menu - Sneak Preview

Filed under
KDE

As previously blogged, openSUSE 10.2 will have a redesigned KDE start menu created by the KDE and usability team at SUSE, after doing usability testing with other start menus. We now have a working prototype, code-named 'Kickoff' (started during world soccer championship, obviously), which is currently being tested with real users in the SUSE usability lab.

Real Time Coming to Linux Real Soon

Filed under
Linux

Thanks to efforts to incorporate Real Time enhancements into Linux, standard mainstream Linux may well become a real, Real Time OS real soon. A Real Time OS offers the promise of better response times and a degree of determinism not found in non-Real Time OS's.

Desktop Linux survey launches

Filed under
Linux

DesktopLinux.com launched its 2006 Desktop Linux survey on August 21, asking users of Linux desktops to identify what distributions they use, as well as their choice of windowing environment (KDE, GNOME, etc.), web browsers, email clients, and Windows-on-Linux solutions.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.17.10 Released

Filed under
Linux

Linux Kernel 2.6.17.10 from the bugfix series includes security fixes: one for SCTP, one for UDF, and a local root user hole. The UDF deadlock might affect some of you using DVD applications, check the Wikipedia link for a description of UDF

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Protect your applications with AppArmor

Filed under
SUSE

AppArmor is a product that Novell acquired when they bought the company Immunix in May 2005. It provides an interesting alternative to traditional security measures. AppArmor works by profiling the applications that it is protecting. A profile records the files that an application needs to access, and the capabilities it needs to exercise, during normal, "good" operation. Subsequently, a profile can be "enforced"; that is, attempts by the application to access resources not explicitly permitted by the profile are denied. Properly configured, AppArmor ensures that each profiled application is allowed to do what it is supposed to do, and nothing else.

Hack Attack: Top 10 Ubuntu apps and tweaks

Filed under
Ubuntu

When I made the switch to Ubuntu Linux on my desktop computer (that is, if you can call triple-booting Windows XP, Vista, and Ubuntu a "switch"), I was a little worried about finding the applications and tools that would make me as productive working in Ubuntu as I am working on Windows.

FTC to examine net neutrality

Filed under
Web

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has formed an "Internet Access Task Force" to examine whether net neutrality advocates' fears of large broadband providers blocking or slowing Web content from competitors are justified, the agency's chairwoman said.

Reveal The Holes In Your Webserver

Filed under
Software
Security
Web

Nikto is an advanced web vulnerability scanner, which can help you expose the potential holes in your webserver (and thus allow you to fix them before malicious users attempt to exploit them). This guide will show you how to use its advanced scanning features to expose holes in your webserver which you never knew existed!

Compiz Update for Scale Plugin (Xgl-related)

Filed under
SUSE

Novell recently released an updated version of Compiz for SLED10*. While I have not identified many changes that end users would notice, there is one that Nat Friedman first showed me at LinuxWorld Expo last week. The Scale plugin (which scales down all open windows on a desktop, allowing you to pick which you want to come make the active window) has gotten a cool improvement.

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