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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:58pm
Story The Staging Update For Linux 4.4: More Than 2,400 Patches Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:58pm
Story Video: No more open source foundations, please! Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:55pm
Story Top 4 open source IRC clients Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:50pm
Story With Microsoft and Red Hat in bed, what happens to SUSE? Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:48pm
Story Linux Foundation throws its weight behind open APIs Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:37pm
Story Side by side: openSuSE Leap and Fedora 23 Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:29pm
Story GNU Guix 0.9.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 7:25pm
Story Microsoft and Red Hat partner to deliver more flexibility and choice sb56637 05/11/2015 - 2:35pm
Story Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with Unity 7 to Support Snappy Packages Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 11:02am

Google Clears Up Confusion in Web Video Brouhaha

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: One way to look at the impact that Google's open source Chrome browser is having is to consider the ripple effect that the company created with its recent blog post on web video standards and browsing.

Also: Google's WebM v H.264: who wins and loses in the video codec wars?
And: Is Google Playing You?

4 Beautiful Ubuntu Unity UI Mockups/Ideas

Filed under
Ubuntu

techdrivein.com: When you look back at the history of Ubuntu through the years, you will see that, Ubuntu Unity is *the* most significant change ever happened to Ubuntu. Now, here are some innovative user created Ubuntu Unity UI mockups/ideas you might find interesting.

Also: 2D Unity Not on the Natty Plan Says Canonical

Xfce 4.8 released

Filed under
Software

xfce.org: Today, after almost two years of work, we have the special pleasure of announcing the much awaited release of Xfce 4.8, the new stable version that supersedes Xfce 4.6.

Lane Fox promises sub-£100 PCs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: Martha Lane Fox is promising £98 computers to tempt the last remaining digital refuseniks in UK to get online.

Opera Has No Plans To Go Open Source: Interview

Filed under
Software
Interviews

muktware.com: Opera is one of those companies which is leading innovation in the Web Browser segment. Despite being one of the strongest proponents of Open Standards on the Web, Opera's own development model is proprietary. We approached Shwetank Dixit, Web Evangelist, Opera to understand.

New features in Amarok 2.4

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Following a beta last month, the Amarok development team has released version 2.4 of the open source music player for the KDE desktop, code named "Slipstream". According to the developers, the project's first release of 2011 is a major update that brings significant performance, usability and stability improvements.

Broadcom Wireless Networking Adapters and Linux

Filed under
Hardware

zdnet.co.uk: There has been quite a bit of discussion and celebration in the Linux community recently because Broadcom released an open-source driver for their wireless networking adapters. This is, undoubtedly, a good thing and it will yield significant long-term benefits for Linux users. But as the owner of several Broadcom-equipped systems I find the current situation to be a bit of a minefield, so I'm going to write down a few notes about what I had experienced so far.

Do you Ubuntu - or do you do 'poo poo' Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerweekly.com: The Ubuntu "server team" and Canonical are in inquisitive lot, they want to ask the community just exactly how it is using the Ubuntu Server Edition -- and in what kinds of organisations, scenarios, environments and/or deployments -- hence the Ubuntu Server Edition was born and is now in its third year.

How Fast Is Firefox 4?

Filed under
Moz/FF

conceivablytech.com: Mozilla has the finish line for Firefox 4 in sight: Beta 9 was just released and the first builds of Beta 10 have been posted to the company’s FTP server. There are just over 100 blocking bugs left. The first article of this series focuses on JavaScript performance.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing Arch Linux – The Base
  • How to Identify a Good Perl Programmer
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 12th December 2010
  • Control Your Network Traffic with Wondershaper in Ubuntu / Debian
  • Graphic corruption woes with mesa 7.10
  • Confining user applications
  • Will The Free Software Desktop Ever Make It?
  • seminar to public about new features of Red Hat Enterprise Linux
  • What *is* OOP?
  • Linux armageddon Linux Mint vs Slackware
  • Reliable and unreliable detection of bundled libraries
  • Amahi Home Server – Setting Up File Duplications & Exploring the App Store
  • Using notify-send as a Conky replacement

omg! Ubuntu! Desktop! Stuff!

Filed under
Software
  • This Minimal ‘conky Orange’ theme would look great on any desktop
  • The weather indicator project revives; what might have been
  • How to Change Sidebar colour in Nautilus-Elementary
  • LibreOffice Ribbon UI mock-up

Quick look at Firefox 4

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Quick look at Firefox 4 for Qt4
  • Firefox 4 Essentials: What You Need To Know Before Making The Switch

Canonical's Landscape should be cheaper

Filed under
Ubuntu

thepcspy.com: Landscape is a tool allowing system administrators to manage and monitor. I’m not here to go over its many features other than to say it’ll save time if you have more than a couple of machines because it lets you see and apply package upgrades.

Long, winding road led from caddyshack to boardroom

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

southcoasttoday.com: Matthew Szulik was all of 8 years old when his father drove him to the New Bedford Country Club and told him to walk to the clubhouse and "go to the man at the end and tell him you want to caddie."

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 158 is out

Filed under
SUSE

NowSpide: Ace new desktop RSS reader in development

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: I don’t like showing off stuff that isn’t stable enough for readers to try for themselves, but when it’s an application this good I just can’t resist.

Asa Dotzler: WebM and AVC: a critical decision

Filed under
Moz/FF

weblogs.mozillazine.org: Why are Opera & Mozilla/Firefox against implementing the H.264 codec in their browsers? If it's a question of licensing H.264 or losing the HTML5 tag, you would think they'd choose to save HTML5. What am I missing?

Ubuntu 11.04 Is Prepping For X Server 1.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Is Prepping For Mesa 7.10, X Server 1.10
  • Is Ubuntu right to dump Gnome for Unity?
  • unity 3d gets new experimental options

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Linux Fund and anti-harassment policy
  • create a gnome panel icon for triggering the compiz expo plugin (like in unity)
  • How to change default in GNOME Terminal to xterm
  • KDE SC 4.6 RC1 – An INTELligent Update
  • Open files in Linux
  • Create a Clone Server
  • Namebench: cross-platform DNS benchmarking tool
  • KDE 4.5.5 available for Mandriva 2010.1 and 2010.2

Open source photo management is a snap

Filed under
Software

mybroadband.co.za: Returned from your holidays with thousands of photos? Here are five tools to make organising and editing your photos more fun.

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More in Tux Machines

How To Install Kali Linux In Android Phone

Thanks to the Linux deployment team now the great wall separating android users from kali has weakened and fallen. It has been a long journey integrating Linux system on advanced RISC machine devices. It started with Ubuntu and now we have a Kali version that can run on your android device. Isn't that great? Great indeed. Read
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Zuul: Proven open-source continuous integration/continuous delivery

If you think Zuul is the Gatekeeper, demigod, and minion of the ancient Hittite god Gozer, then you're a Ghostbusters fan, too. But, if you're interested in continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) and not "human sacrifice, dogs, and cats living together... mass hysteria," then you want Zuul, OpenStack's open-source CI/CD platform. Zuul originally was developed for OpenStack CI testing. For years, OpenStack, the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud, got all the attention. Over time, people began to realize that as impressive as OpenStack was, the CI system behind it, which enabled contributors and users across many different organizations to work and develop quickly together across multiple projects, was impressive in its own right. Read more

Smallest RK3399 hacker board yet ships at $129 with 4GB DDR4

FriendlyElec has launched a 100 x 64mm, $129 “NanoPC-T4” SBC that runs Android or Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 with 4G DDR4, native GbE, WiFi-ac, DP, HDMI 2.0, 0 to 80℃ support, and M.2 and 40-pin expansion. FriendlyElec has released its most powerful and priciest hacker board to date, which it promotes as being the smallest RK3399-based SBC on the market. The 100 x 64mm NanoPC-T4 opens with a $129 discount price with the default 4GB DDR4 and 16GB eMMC. Although that will likely rise in the coming months, it’s still priced in the middle range of open spec RK3399 SBCs. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".