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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Flashing Your Motherboard BIOS From The Linux Desktop

  • First view of KDE's Social Desktop
  • Ubuntu and Fedora Replace init with Upstart
  • Is Microsoft Headed For A Netbook Train Wreck?
  • More console apps, for future reference
  • Sauerbraten 2009 Trooper Edition Released
  • ESP launches Wiki for Anti-Software Patent Campaigns
  • Turbo Ubuntu Redux
  • Frustrations with help for a newbie
  • Non-Free and Free - My 2 cents
  • Microsoft support for OpenDocument (ODF) Evaluation
  • Tesla Personal Supercomputer, the Supercomputer in a Box
  • A Look at Ubuntu 9.04
  • upgrading to mandriva 2009.1
  • The LKML Summary Podcast
  • NoScript Developer Apologizes For Meddling With AdBlock
  • First Moonlight 2.0 Preview is Out
  • Red Hat CEO: 'The Cloud Belongs to Linux'
  • Adopting newcomers to FOSS/Linux
  • Gmail Notifier is a Light, Convenient Email Checker for Ubuntu
  • So you want to be an open source contributor?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create exciting desktop movies with recordMyDesktop

  • Open Movie Editor - a simple non-linear video editor
  • Workaround to get sound on HP mini with Jaunty
  • How to schedule tasks on Linux using the ‘at’ command
  • OOo: Delete Key Deletes Immediately
  • Firewall on Debian Lenny

5 Things that Don’t Work in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

2indya.com: Though there are lots of differences and dissimilarities in Microsoft Windows and Ubuntu and we have discussed them in our earlier articles, here are five such more things that you won’t find working in Ubuntu but are used to do in Windows.

8 KDE 4 Distributions

Filed under
Linux

repasik.com: There are many KDE distributions, but some have refused to move to KDE 4 and have stayed with KDE 3.5 instead like Mepis, Sidux and Slax. Here is a list of KDE 4 distributions to help distro-hoppers with their searching:

Linux Desktop Market Share: Greater Than One Percent?

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: According to NetApplications, GNU/Linux now accounts for 1.02% of computer desktops. Alternatively, you might prefer -- as I do -- to question the statistic's accuracy, and look at other ways to estimate GNU/Linux's presence.

Linux And Politics Don’t Mix Well

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Yesterday, lead maintainer of one of my favorite Linux distribution, Linux Mint, made a blog post on the official Linux Mint blog asking people from Israel and sympathizers of their cause to not only stop giving donation to Linux Mint but also to stop using Linux Mint altogether.

NoScript Isn’t The Only Guilty Party

Filed under
Moz/FF

customdistros.com: There was a big brew-ha-ha over the past few days with NoScript and some unscrupulous bit of code installed in it. However, even though Maone has born the brunt of this controversy, he is not the only guilty party in this.

5 Must Try Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

blogpirate.org: I’m going to gather some well known info about these five popular Linux distribution to give you small preview of Linux operating systems. This is not a top five, rather five distributions I know about.

Anti-malware software upgraded for Linux

Filed under
Software

desktoplinux.com: AVG Technologies has released a new version of its anti-malware software for Linux desktops. Available in licensed server and free workstation editions (pictured), AVG 8.5 for Linux combines email and file-server protection with streamlined scanning, new antivirus filtering, and improved performance.

The RGB/Green.org Sustainability Challenge

Filed under
Linux

Strengthen your local community with an organically grown Drupal site

Linux Still Not Ready for Prime Time

Filed under
Linux

suffolk757.com/blog: I’m a Fedora fan, and I’m impressed with each new release, but in the end, its just nowhere near ready.

"Hotspot in a box" runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Proxicast is shipping a portable, battery-powered 3G and 802.11 a/b/g WiFi hotspot that runs embedded Linux.

KDE 4.2: Finally a new Linux desktop I can like

Filed under
KDE

blogs.computerworld.com: I won't rehash my feelings about earlier versions of KDE. Suffice it to say I didn't like it and you can review my comments about KDE 4.0 and KDE 4.1 elsewhere. At first glance, I also wasn't impressed with KDE 4.2, but I decided to give it one more try, after some performance fixes in the latest edition, and I'm finally impressed.

Mozilla ponders policy change after Firefox extension battle

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: The NoScript Firefox extension faced a major backlash last week when users discovered that it was surreptitiously disrupting the operation of AdBlock Plus. Mozilla has responded by proposing a new policy that sets boundaries for appropriate extension behavior.

Store passwords with pwsafe

Filed under
Software
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Secure password storage is a big thing these days, particularly with the (good!) advice of not re-using passwords in more than one place. The thinking behind that is that if someone figures out a password for one service or Web site, they will not be able to re-use that password on other sites and further obtain access to your credentials and services.

A Little About Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.blogs2k.com: I’m not a hater of Ubuntu by any means. I think it’s done a ton of good for Linux. However, I do have a problem with some of rather “excitable” users in the Ubuntu community. Let’s take a look.

Razer Arctosa Keyboard

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: The Razer Arctosa is a moderately priced gaming keyboard that offers macro keys, media keys, 1000Hz Ultrapolling, and other features to entice gamers. The big question though is how well this keyboard with all of its functionality works under Linux.

Top 10 Linux FUD Patterns, Part 9

Filed under
Linux

linuxfud.wordpress: Warning! Using Linux will expose you to legal action by Microsoft! At least that’s what some would like for you to believe.

Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst to Deliver Keynote Address at SIIA

Filed under
Linux

PR: Red Hat, Inc. today announced that President and CEO, Jim Whitehurst, will deliver the keynote address at the Software & Information Industry Association's (SIIA) Software Summit & CODiE Awards.

Mandriva 2009.1 “Spring” is Stunning

Filed under
MDV

itnewstoday.com: After checking out Kubuntu 9.04, I found myself terribly disappointed and looking for another KDE-based distribution, so I could possibly experience greener pastures.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).