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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

5 things to do before upgrading to Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxnov.com: After you installed the new version, you maybe will say ”where is my bookmarks!!!!?” so, Before upgrading to Ubuntu 10.04 LTS which will release on April 29, their are 5 things recommended to do with the distribution you already have.

Why You Don't Contribute To Open-Source

Filed under
OSS

phoronix.com: Over on the GCC mailing list is a rather lively discussion. A developer is asking why you don't participate in contributing to GCC?

Minitube, a YouTube Desktop Client for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Do you want to watch YouTube videos in High-definition format without opening a web browser or without having the need to install Flash Player? If yes, then let me introduce you to a simple but capable YouTube desktop client.

Also: Minitube Developer Working On New Music Player: Minitunes

10 Linux commands for beginners

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: For tasks like controlling and monitoring the distro's underlying system, the command line remains indispensable. Here are some commands that will elevate you from a total newbie to an informed command line user.

Ubuntu 10.04 Overview

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 10.04 Overview
  • Ubuntu Lucid in final stretch
  • Canonical Talks Ubuntu's Cloud Prospects

Avaneya – More Than Just A Game

Filed under
Gaming

linux-hardcore.com: Avaneya is a science fiction FOSS game exclusively for the GNU/Linux platform. It focuses on social justice, human rights,city building, adventure, strategy, economics and sustainability amidst a Martian planetary setting in the future.

Analyzing I/O Performance In Linux

Filed under
Linux

cmdln.org: Monitoring and analyzing performance is an important task for any sysadmin. Disk I/O bottlenecks can bring applications to a crawl. What is an IOP? Should I use SATA, SAS, or FC? How many spindles do I need? What RAID level should I use? Is my system read or write heavy?

Cherry-Picking Open Source Licenses

Filed under
OSS

law.com: The widespread creation and reuse of open source software by commercial companies has introduced a whole new level of complexity to the legal challenges related to software licenses.

SilverStone HDDBOOST

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: SilverStone advertises the HDDBOOST as being a unique product to build a "virtual super storage solution." by combining a solid-state drive with a hard drive.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New Download Manager for Linux
  • CrossOver 9.0 Linux Review A finely packaged Wine
  • German appeal court upholds Microsoft FAT patent
  • FreeBSD/CLANG compiler ready for testing
  • Kernel Review with openSUSE Flavor (Week 16)
  • Kaudiocreator Returns in KDE4
  • VLC media player version 1.0.6 release
  • What scares people away from Linux
  • Fedora elections coming up
  • Valve Updates Its Unreleased Steam Linux Client
  • IPv4's Last Day: What Will Happen When There Is Only IPv6?
  • BSDTalk interview with Dru Lavigne
  • VMware’s Database Play: Will Red Hat Follow?
  • A Walk On The Stupid Side: How Does The Other Half Live?
  • Appliances and Linux
  • Linux Outlaws 147 - Where's the 'kin Phone?

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS
  • The future of open source is in the middle
  • Cenatic: 'Using open source is key for e-government'
  • EU: open standards and interoperable systems for e-government
  • How the UK government can follow Obama's open source revolution
  • Using version control to manage Intellectual Property

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 7zip File: How to Uncompress 7z files
  • Bash: Handling Command Not Found
  • Encrypt your files quick n’ dirty
  • How to Install Vuze 4.4.0 on Ubuntu
  • Check your unread messages in Gmail, from terminal

Linux System Information Decoded

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: System Administrator Dilemma #942: Send a Data Center Service Tech out to pop open the case to tell you what’s in your system or use two simple commands.

The worst thing Oracle can do

Filed under
Software
  • The worst thing Oracle can do to open source is not care
  • Will Oracle Leave Open Source Customers High And Dry?

Free/Open Source Software Global Maturity Matrix (FOSS GloMM)

Filed under
OSS

jamesdixon.wordpress: I have stated a few times that the Free Software Foundation (FSF) and its advocates don’t have a vision of the future that I find viable. Twenty years from now, across the globe, every individual, business, organization, and government entity will have FOSS suitable for all their needs.

How to switch your small or home office to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

wine-reviews.net: With Linux and free software making a name for itself in the world of big business, many people are testing the feasibility of switching small and home office software to their open source equivalents.

Linux NetworkManager a Solid Tool with New Features

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Applications like Firefox and OpenOffice.org get all the glory. They're highly visible as cornerstone applications of the free desktop. But what about the background apps that do the grunt work and sit silently in the background, ignored unless we run into a bug?

Ubuntu wants Adobe, even if Apple doesn't

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu wants Adobe, even if Apple doesn't
  • Comparison: Ubuntu update manager and 2clickUpdate
  • Frugal Tech Show: Matt Zimmerman, CTO of Canonical
  • Four tools for graphics applications in Ubuntu
  • Trying to switch to Empathy
  • Xubuntu Lucid - Sweet awesomeness!
  • Ubuntu Discards System Tray
  • Nautilius-Elementary 2.30 for Ubuntu Will Wow You

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.34 (Part 2) - File Systems

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Version 2.6.34 of the Linux kernel will be the first to support the Ceph and LogFS file systems. A number of changes to the Btrfs and XFS code promise improved performance. The kernel should now be better at working with drives with 4 KB logical sectors.

Open Source Communities: Canonical, Ubuntu and Jono Bacon

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

robertogaloppini.net: Recently MuleSource partnered with Canonical to improve Tomcat packaging for Ubuntu and Debian. To learn more about Ubuntu I managed to pose few questions to Jono, Ubuntu’s community manager and author of “The Art of Community”.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."