Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope feels rushed and premature

Filed under
Ubuntu

bitburners.com: They could have called it the Rushed Ram or Bugsy Bear, but instead its a fictional creature Jackalope. Ubuntu’s latest tries to bring some innovation to the table, after the intermediate Ibex, but unfortunately it doesn’t feel ready from day one.

Linux clients break 1% web usage share

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: According to NetApplications, Linux usage share on client devices has, for the first time, passed the 1% mark.

PC-BSD 7.1 Galileo - Review

Filed under
BSD

dedoimedo.com: The world of open-source desktop revolves mainly around Linux. Still, there are several other players that you may want to consider as your desktop distribution. One of them is PC-BSD.

Chasing the white whale

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.04 does not use ext4 by default

  • Canonical Engaging Ubuntu Software Partners
  • Chasing the white whale- “the year of the linux desktop” and “new ubuntu theme”

State of the GNU/Linux Desktop 2009 Part 2/4: Hardware Support

Filed under
Linux

codingexperiments.com: As mentioned in part one of this series, despite the legendary pace of development in the Open Source community, it can be difficult to keep tabs on what is being worked on. Arguably, multimedia is just a subdivision of hardware support, another area where Free operating systems have suffered.

Windows 7 leaves netbook market open for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

itwire.com: Microsoft's newest operating system Windows 7 will leave much of the burgeoning netbook market open for Linux because of its relatively large footprint.

New Sauerbraten Release Is Imminent

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Within the next few days we should see the first 2009 release of Sauerbraten and it brings a host of new features. In this article is a rundown on some of the key features along with screenshots we captured when running their latest Subversion code.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing VICE 2.1 on Ubuntu 9.04

  • More Karmic plans
  • Gmail Notifier Highly Integrates with Ubuntu 9.04
  • Reconfigure automatic login in ubuntu 9.04 jaunty jackalope
  • Replacing text in multiple files
  • Red Hat: Building $600 Million Partner Channel?
  • Microsoft Admits Windows 7 Is Not Really Suitable For Netbooks
  • NetBSD, Mandriva get shiny new releases
  • Command Line vs. GUI Reality Check
  • How to upgrade from Mandriva 2009 to the new Mandriva 2009 Spring
  • The GNOME Foundation Needs Your Help
  • Palm's Pré: the $170 phone
  • Quickly edit your images with IrfanView
  • Customize your Ubuntu GNOME theme
  • ntop installation/configuration on OpenSuSe
  • Sound Converter
  • Are configuration management tools still needed in the cloud?
  • A brief introduction to mod_perl - Part 1

Ubuntu Backup Software

Filed under
Software

tuxguides.com: Backing up files can be useful in case you suffer hard drive issues, but it can also be helpful in case of “messing up” a file, and needing a backup of it. There are many different backup options available for ubuntu.

Open source app puts the squeeze on network traffic

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: A group called the Traffic Squeezer project released an open source application that accelerates WAN network traffic.

Yawn: Ubuntu 9.04 More of the same

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.04: More of the same

  • Shortcuts That Work for Ubuntu 9.04
  • A year with Ubuntu Linux

Mandriva 2009 Spring Kicks Vista7 back to /dev/null

Filed under
MDV

izanbardprince.wordpress: With my latest foray into Windows 7 build 7100 (official Release Candidate from MS Technet) I was experiencing largely the same errors/issues/bad performance as I had on the unofficial 7057 and 7077 wherein everyone replied “Hold your horses”

Security in Open Source Projects: Lessons From Mozilla and Drupal

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Over the past few years, implementing security properly has become a big issue for software applications of all stripes, including open source applications and platforms.

Ubuntu for desktop PCs public library in city of Boom

Filed under
Ubuntu

osor.eu: The public administration of the city of Boom is using Ubuntu for ten new publicly accessible desktop PCs in its public library. The Boom library is not the only public library in Belgium using this GNU/Linux distribution.

Btrfs Is Not Yet The Performance King

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: With the release this week of Fedora 11 Preview, which incorporates install-time support for the Btrfs file-system into Red Hat's Anaconda installer, we have now delivered our first set of benchmark results for this next-generation Linux file-system.

Mandriva's latest touted for fast boots

Filed under
MDV

desktoplinux.com: Mandriva has released the final version of Mandriva Linux Spring 2009. The new version offers KDE 4.2.2 as the default desktop, delivers up to 25 percent faster boots, supports additional netbooks, and provides enhanced networking and security tools.

Fedora 10 put to the test

Filed under
Linux

whatpc.co.uk: In the early days of Linux, distributions varied widely in what they offered and who they were aimed at, but today the list of what they have in common tends to be much longer than how they differ.

GConf - GNOME Desktop on steroids

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: GConf is a system of storing preferences of most of the installed applications, as well as the environment and desktop for GNOME for Linux.

Red Hat plans more hiring after adding 600 employees

Filed under
Linux

bizjournals.com: Despite the worst recession in decades, Linux giant Red Hat added 600 employees to its rolls during the 12 months that ended Feb. 28, and the Raleigh company anticipates more hiring going forward.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

Today in Techrights