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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 assistive technology open source programs Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 6:20pm
Story Automation controller taps Raspberry Pi Compute Module Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 6:13pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 4:30pm
Story Android and New Device Types to Share Spotlight at Google I/O Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 4:14pm
Story GNOME's Orca Screen Reader Receives Major Changes and Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 4:08pm
Story Running The Linux 3.16 Kernel Might Be A Bit Slower On An Ultrabook Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 4:04pm
Story GNOME Control Center 3.13.2 Finally Gets HiDpi Support Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:58pm
Story New icon browser tool for GTK+ developers in development Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:54pm
Story Neptune 4.0 Wants to Be the Best KDE-Based OS Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:46pm
Story Video Interview: Werner Knoblich, VP & GM EMEA – Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 3:36pm

Readers’ Choice: Awesome Linux Apps that Need Our Attention

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: I got some very interesting comments on my post about Linux projects that need more attention, so I decided to feature a few of the readers’ recommendations.

BackupPC - A handy Linux backup tool

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: Backing up Linux machines can be challenging, especially for storage/backup administrators who are used to working primarily with Windows.

Cloudera Floats Linux Distro for Cloud Computing

Filed under
Linux

newsfactor.com: Cloudera is releasing a Linux distro for Hadoop, the cloud-computing technology behind Facebook, Google and others. Cloudera's Hadoop is aimed at regular enterprise data centers.

How does Ubuntu's Upstart system initialization compare with runit?

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Vincent Danen takes a look at Ubuntu’s Upstart system, which is an event-based replacement for SysV init that handles the starting of tasks and services during boot.

Designing Firefox 3.2

Filed under
Moz/FF

informationarchitects.jp: In January 2000, T-Online asked us what we’d do if we could design a browser from scratch. Our answer was “Tabs”. Eight years later Aza Raskin, head of user experience at Mozilla, asked me what I think a new tab should look like. The answer after days of mailing back and forth: “Forget tabs!”

Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 - Superb is too modest

Filed under
Moz/FF

dedoimedo.com: Firefox is my favorite browser. It is fast, stable and extensible. It is also quite safe. And it looks good, too. Finally, you may also have heard that Firefox 3.1, the latest version of this phenomenal browser is coming out soon.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC1 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
MDV

news.softpedia.com: On March 10th, Mandriva announced the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC1. Though a bit late, we thought it would be nice to please some of our readers and offer them a visual tour of this first release candidate.

Arch Linux - a distro collector’s pick

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: Are you tired of frequent seeking or all these mega-piles of CDs constantly growing on your desktop? Is there any place left out there? Do you really need to wait another six months to update your software or get the feature you expect?

10 Linux and open source developer tools you should not overlook

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: To take advantage of the excellent Linux development environment, you need to have the right tools. Here’s a rundown of some of the best ones out there and the features they have to offer.

Mozilla says next Firefox likely months away

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet.com: Mozilla had planned to release its new "Shiretoko" version of Firefox in early 2009, but with the scale of changes made to the open-source browser, a date halfway through the year now looks more realistic.

Why glxgears is slower with Kernel Modesetting (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

qa-rockstar.livejournal: One interesting fact came out of yesterday's Intel KMS Test Day. Everyone noticed that glxgears is much slower under KMS/DRI2 than it was before (e.g. in Fedora 9 or 10)

Get it done with GNOME Do 0.8.1

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: GNOME Do is an open source launcher utility for the Linux desktop. Its new dock interface combines Mac-like polish and usability with highly efficient keyboard control, and we put it through its paces.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.29 - Part 7:

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: On Thursday night, Linus Torvalds released an eighth pre-release version of Linux 2.6.29 and hinted that this could be the final 2.6.29 release candidate. "What's coming in 2.6.29" series with an overview of driver news from a range of areas.

WattOS Mini-Review

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: My first thought here's yet another Ubuntu dirivitive how many more can there be? Then wait a minute what's this?

the best Linux newsreaders

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Ah, Usenet newsgroups… Online communication and file sharing for the masses, still equal today to what it was before the advent of blogs, instant messaging and P2P networks.

File-System Benchmarks On The Intel X25-E SSD

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Late last month we looked at the Intel X25-E Extreme SSD on Linux. We ran this high-performance solid-state drive within a System76 Serval Notebook and compared its performance to a Seagate Momentus 7200.2 SATA HDD.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 294

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: Installing Linux with Logical Volume Management

  • News: Slackware switches to KDE 4, Ubuntu packages Plymouth, openSUSE resurrects broken download server, Debian overviews 'Squeeze', Tiny Core reveals 10 MB desktop distro, best window managers of 2000
  • Released last week: PCLinuxOS 2009.1, Tiny Core Linux 1.2
  • Upcoming releases: OpenBSD 4.5 pre-orders, Frugalware Linux 1.0
  • New additions: moonOS
  • New distributions: ARAnyM/AFROS Live CD, FuguIta, Jarro Negro Linux, Livre S.O.
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Change is a hard thing to do

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: Changing from closed source programs to open source programs is a hard thing to do. Many people will resist that change fiercely and will pull every trick out of the book to justify their objections to that change.

hands-on with the Kogan Agora Netbook Pro

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

pcworld.idg.com.au: Look out Australia, there's a new netbook about to hit town and it's by Kogan. It's a 10.2in netbook that will cost $539. For the price you'll get 2GB of RAM and a 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU. Kogan has chosen to release the Agora Netbook Pro with gOS.

Don’t fear the fsync!

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: After reading the comments on my earlier post, Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem, it’s become very clear to me that there are a lot of myths and misplaced concerns about fsync() and how best to use it.

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More in Tux Machines

CentOS vs Ubuntu: Which one is better for a server

Finally decided to get a VPS but can’t decide which Linux distro to use? We’ve all been there. The choice may even be overwhelming, even for Linux distros, considering all the different flavors and distros that are out there. Though, the two most widely used and most popular server distros are CentOS and Ubuntu. This is the main dilemma among admins, both beginners and professionals. Having experience with both (and more) distros, we decided to do a comparison of CentOS and Ubuntu when used for a server. Read more

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games