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About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Overview of Kate Editor in KDE 4.12.3 Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 12:05pm
Story App folder configuration Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 11:54am
Story Popcorn Time Is Back Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:41am
Story Time Warner’s Live Chat Doesn’t Speak Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:30am
Story The past year for Joomla! Framework Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:13am
Story UK, Israel sign agreement on open standards, open source Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:08am
Story Linux Distro’s, FOSS and the advocates behind them – Some food for thought? Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:04am
Story OpenStack's top operating system: Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 3:34am
Story Popcorn Time Is Dead Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 11:25pm
Story Linux 3.15 To Support DRM Render-Nodes By Default Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:43pm

Customizing Ubuntu to provide stunning looks

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jamesselvakumar.wordpress: As I used my Ubuntu more and more, I felt the pain of living with Ubuntu’s default font rendering, especially when I browse using firefox. I tried all the options available under the “fonts” section in “Appearance Preferences” with no fruitful result. Then when I started looking around for solutions.

Open Source is a Way of Life

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lispmachine.wordpress: People are wrong when they say GNU (FSF) is just a collection of free softwares, GNU is a way of life. This way of life transcends itself from software profession into one’s personal and social life too. The truth is not that when people come in the GNU community then they become good, that they become the ones who think of society first instead like others who think of their selfish business interests based on the proprietary softwares.

What's Next For Linux? Unifying The OS Amid Steady Change

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Linux What's next for linux? There's no simple answer because Linux isn't a single entity but a galaxy of implementations and possibilities. The Linux kernel--version, to be precise--is at the center of it all, with the operating system continuously morphing into new shapes.

Xfce 4.6 Beta 2 (Hopper) released

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Software The second Beta was delayed for 2 weeks, but it was worth it. Every feature we made a freeze-exception for has made it into this release. This means a lot of bugs have been fixed this time as well:

Q&A: Richard Stallman

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Interviews In an exclusive interview with, Stallman discusses his views on free versus proprietary and open source software, social networking sites and privacy issues.

OpenOffice five times more popular than Google Docs

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OOo Confirming recent comments by Microsoft Corp. CEO Steve Ballmer, an independent study released Friday found's free office suite to be five times more popular among adult U.S. internet users than Google Docs.

today's leftovers

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  • Short Review of Ubuntu 8.10 Final

  • Set Mantis to track your bugs
  • NASA turns to open-source problem-tracking databases
  • Reg readers in Firefox 3 lovefest
  • X Server 1.6 Gets A Release Schedule
  • NVIDIA Driver Brings PureVideo Features To Linux
  • PPC Linux distributor acquired
  • Bug Labs creates open source Lego for software engineers
  • Mozilla Thunderbird using Drupal
  • Ubuntu 8.10 on the AA1: installation/review
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3b adds to virtualization
  • A Peek at Fedora 10 "Preview"
  • openSUSE 11.1: Power Management

some howtos:

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  • Metacity Compositing Effects in Ubuntu 8.10

  • Install and Configure Cacti Monitoring tool in Ubuntu 8.10
  • list the most recent files in a directory
  • Back-of-the-napkin calculations with Frink
  • Internet Explorer in Linux - Tutorial
  • How to get the CMake version you need
  • FAQ: How to scrollback in GNU SCREEN?
  • Installing Apple's Safari Browser and Itunes 7 On OpenSuSe 11 With PlayOnLinux
  • Turn openSUSE 11 Live CD into a ZENworks Imaging Tool

Spotlight on Linux

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Linux Mobile Internet devices (MIDs) and other small form-factor systems based on Intel Atom processors and the Intel-sponsored Linux stack are finally starting to arrive. This Hot Topic summary and reading list captures the early history of this key mobile stack.

my glowing heart .. er .. panel

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aseigo.blogspot: Plasma only unhides the panel when you move the mouse in the space the panel actually exists, whereas Kicker would just unhide everything on a screen edge when you came in contact with it. Thomas said it'd be neat if the panel 'glowed' when off screen.

Oblong's g-speak: the 'Minority Report' OS brought to life

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OS If you've been waiting for that Minority Report-style interface to really come to fruition, you can finally exhale. One of the science advisors from the Steven Spielberg film -- along with a team of other zany visionaries -- has created an honest-to-goodness, real-world implementation of the computer systems seen in the movie.

Ubuntu Intrepid Regression: Beware of Wireless and WPA

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journal.dedasys: A lot of people, myself included as of the upgrade I did last night, seem to be having trouble using certain wireless chipsets with WPA.

Why I Am Leaning Toward OpenSolaris

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codeghar.wordpress: Sun makes its own Unix operating system, called Solaris. In an effort to be more open source oriented, Sun is releasing parts of Solaris as OpenSolaris. Here I will try to find reasons why OpenSolaris would be a good choice.

Poll: What kind of a Linux advocate are you?

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Linux I just read a post, “Help Spread Linux… Don’t Preach It!” about Linux advocacy and what the author thinks is the right and wrong approach to spreading the word. Take the poll and let us know how you see your role in being a champion of Linux and open source.

Interview: Angela Byron, Top Drupal Developer and Evangelist

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Drupal Angela Byron is one of the lead developers and a community manager for the open source content management system Drupal, which OStatic is based on (along with sites such as The Onion and Fast Company).

Presenting with Linux - Impress with Success

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OOo One of the biggest things about any effort to advertise Linux among your fellow workers or classmates is to demonstrate it yourself in your everyday activities. A rather simple example of this can come from doing presentations.

The iPhone Could Have Been a Linux Machine

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Linux The ongoing Tony Fadell/ Mark Papermaster law-court shuffle is far outside of the Gadget Lab coverage zone), but one fascinating fact has emerged from the dust storm of speculation: Fadell, the Father of the iPod, wanted to make a Linux-based iPhone. How do you think Steve Jobs took that one?

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.28 - Part 5: updates for netbooks and notebooks

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Linux Following the kernel developers' addition of a driver to the kernel supporting the ACPI Integrated Graphics Device OpRegion Specification, as we reported previously, thanks to ACPI developers, a change to the driver found its way into the kernel on Wednesday night.

Linux Equivalents To Things You Do In Windows

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Software You’ve heard time and time again from Linux fans that "Linux can do anything Windows can do". Is this true? Yes. However what the Linux fans usually don’t mention is how to do the stuff you do in Windows in Linux.

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Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more