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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

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  • Getting Gnome Volume Manager to Play Nice

  • Crafting offers and invoice documents with Kraft
  • Find all SSH Hosts
  • Setting Up Parental Controls in Ubuntu
  • Easier file renaming with renameutils
  • Improve Your Intelligence with Brain Workshop
  • Add windows codecs to Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10

Coherence brings UPnP to GNOME

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Software Coherence is a Python library that implements UPnP and the Digital Living Network Alliance standard, protocols that facilitate interoperability between networked media devices.

Unemployed? Five reasons to build your resume with FOSS contributions

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OSS It looks like we’ve gone from speculating whether we’re headed into recession depression. Yihong Ding, over on the Thinking Space blog,predicts that we’ll have a “Golden Age” of the Web. If that’s the case, shouldn’t we be expecting a “Golden Age” for open source, with all the idle programmers and IT folks at home with time on their hands?

Review of StarOffice 9

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Software For several weeks now I have been testing an early copy of StarOffice 9, Sun’s commercial alternative of Finally, today, I can tell you about it.

On a Blender Bender

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Software So being interested in all things 3d, I finally sat down and started learning Blender. The inability of me to make acceptable looking 3d models has long been a hole in my 3d graphics knowledge, but no more!

Another day, another Microsoft lie

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Microsoft You can count on Microsoft pulling the fake research report trick at least once a year. This time around it’s a study by ClickStream Technologies, which found Microsoft Office, to be far more popular than, which in turn was far more popular than Google Docs.

Introducing Kwin

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introducingkde4.blogspot: KDE 3.5.x had an option for enabling composite called kcompmgr. The KDE developers wanted eye-candy composite for they KDE 4 series, so they had 3 options, writing a whole new window manager, use compiz or improving kwin, they took the last one.

Flickr Uploaders for Linux: Secretive, But Not Endangered Beasts

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Software Flickr is almost like Xerox, or Kleenex, in that its name is in some ways inextricably linked to the service it delivers. Though Flickr has a browser uploader, there are limitations. For years, there has been one uploader option on that page -- a third party, cross platform (and very serviceable) -- that is Linux compatible.

Open Source Considered Harmful

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OSS As soon as I think I have a handle on where things are currently at, along comes some new complex twist; some new turn; some new innovation that threatens to take the status quo and put it through the wood chipper. I blame the open source phenomenon for that.

Firefox 3.1 gets tab tearing

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Moz/FF The latest Firefox 3.1 development release features the announced option for tab tearing: drag a tab out of its current window, and it is removed and opened on a new one, providing a more intuitive way to organize your web browsing.

Also: Here Be Dragons!

Linux Netbooks

Three Ways to Use Free Software Without Ripping Anyone Off

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I talk to people a lot about free and open software. I usually find that people have never heard of it before. So I talk to people a lot, and hand out CDs full of free software, believing I’m helping people by giving them options that don’t cost hundreds of dollars. One person I talked to a lot about free software was Ross.

Mandriva Linux 2009 One Xfce released

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Thanks to the Mandriva Xfce volunteer development team, a community Xfce One edition of Mandriva Linux 2009 is now available for download from all official Mandriva mirrors. A list of download locations can be found on the Wiki page. This release gives you all the benefits of Mandriva Linux 2009 along with a fast and stable Xfce desktop.

From Windows Capable to the Linux laptop

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Linux I think you can draw a straight line from the Vista Capable brouhaha to recent introductions of laptop Linux by HP and Dell, once Microsoft’s most loyal OEMs.

The Super Windows That...Couldn't

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Linux One of the more bizarre accusations flung by Microsoft at GNU/Linux over the years is that it doesn't scale. Sadly, that narrative has been rather undermined by the independent Top500 supercomputing sites ranking.

Linux Mint

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Linux I’ve always had a geeky side which has led to experimentation with other operating systems, such as FreeBSD, Solaris, and Linux. This weekend I started to wonder what the Linux community was up to so I headed over to DistroWatch to read up on the news. I saw a distro that I had never heard of before in the number 3 spot: Linux Mint.

Banshee 1.4.1 Review

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Another crappy review of Banshee? I don't think so!

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 278

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: DistroWatch Weekly - end of an era

  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 3.5.1, Ultimate Edition 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 1, Fedora 11 release schedule
  • New additions: ExTIX
  • New distributions: CAINE, Canaima, Progex, RsLive, Suriyan Linux, VortexBox, WeakNet Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

8 Great Alternative Desktop Managers For Linux

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Software Most of the Linux users should be familiar with Gnome and KDE since both of them are the most commonly used desktop managers in the various Linux distros. Now, if you are using an old PC with low hardware specs, you might find that the above two desktop environments are too heavy for your computer to handle.

Attack Of The Ubuntu Forks

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Ubuntu Every time there is a new Linux distro that is making a lot of noise in the Linux community, it is just waiting to be forked by someone. Today, we will look at some of the well-received Ubuntu based forks out there, which are not supported by Canonical.

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More in Tux Machines

New Cortex-M chips add ARMv8 and TrustZone

ARM launched its first Cortex-M MCUs with ARMv8-M and TrustZone security: the tiny, low-power Cortex-M23 and faster Cortex-M33. At the ARM TechCon show in Santa Clara, ARM unveiled two new Cortex-M microprocessors that will likely emerge as major Internet of Things workhorses over the coming decade, supplanting most existing Cortex-M designs. The Cortex-M23 and Cortex-M33 are also the first Cortex-M processors with ARMv8-M technology, enabling ARM TrustZone security, among other benefits. The TrustZone support is enabled via a new IoT-oriented CoreLink SIE-200 network-on-chip, which adds IP blocks on top of the AMBA 5 AHB5 interface. ARM also announced a TrustZone CryptoCell-312 technology for creating secure SoCs based on ARMv8-M. Read more

OpenStack in the Headlines

  • From OpenStack Summit, Red Hat Reports That the Deployment Era is Here
    As noted here yesterday, OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. A new study by 451 Research analysts shows that about 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. Meanwhile, in conjunction with OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Red Hat is out with very notable results from its polling of its OpenStack user base. Its study found that production deployments increased hugely in the last year, according to a survey of 150 information technology decision makers and professionals carried out by Red Hat.
  • You can run the same programs on 16 different OpenStack clouds
    Cloud companies like to talk about about how you can avoid vendor lock-in. And OpenStack just showed how to make it happen. Sixteen different vendors did a live demo at OpenStack Summit showing that you could run the same software stack on 16 separate OpenStack platforms.
  • ​Where OpenStack cloud is today and where it's going tomorrow
    The future looks bright for OpenStack -- according to 451 Research, OpenStack is growing rapidly to become a $5-billion-a-year cloud business. But obstacles still remain.
  • ​Mirantis OpenStack: The good news and the bad news
    Mirantis recently signed a major deal with NTT, but the company is also laying off some of its employees.
  • The World Runs on OpenStack
    The OpenStack Summit keynotes got underway the morning of October 25, with Mark Collier, Chief Operating Officer of the OpenStack Foundation, declaring that the world runs on OpenStack.
  • Study: OpenStack is Marching Forward in Enterprises
    How fast is the OpenStack global cloud services market growing? Research and Markets analysts came out with a new report recently that forecasts the global OpenStack cloud market to grow at a CAGR of 30.49% during the period 2016-2020. Many enterprises now have large scale OpenStack deployments, and in conjunction with this week's OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, new study results are shedding light on exactly how entrenched this open cloud platform is in enteprises. The bottom line is: OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. OpenStack deployments are getting bigger. Users are diversifying across industries. Enterprises report using the open source cloud software to support workloads that are critical to their businesses. These are among the findings in a recent study by 451 Research regarding OpenStack adoption among enterprise private cloud users. About 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. The study was commissioned by the OpenStack Foundation. Here are some of the companies discussing their OpenStack deployments in Barcelona: Banco Santander, BBVA, CERN, China Mobile, Comcast, Constant Contact, Crowdstar, Deutsche Telekom, Folksam, Sky UK, Snapdeal, Swisscom, Telefonica, Verizon, Volkswagen, and Walmart. You can find some of the specific deployment stories from the companies at the OpenStack User Stories page.

Alpine Linux 3.4.5 released

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.4.5 of its Alpine Linux operating system. This is a bugfix release of the v3.4 musl based branch, based on linux-4.4.27 kernels and it contains important security fixes for the kernel and for musl libc. Read more

Linux Graphics