Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 5:22pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 5:21pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 5:14pm
Story UbuTricks 14.11.17 Released with Support for 6 New Apps, 20 Updated Apps Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 5:07pm
Story Linux extremists owe Debian systemd maintainer an apology Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 5:04pm
Story Can India break the pattern and do open source right? Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 4:58pm
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.5.0 released... Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Release Notes for Grml 2014.11 Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 4:23pm
Story A GUI for Your CLI? Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 10:27am
Story An Unofficial Lubuntu 14.10 Image Using LXQt Has Been Released Roy Schestowitz 18/11/2014 - 10:21am

How to convert non-techies to Linux.

Filed under
Linux

idreamoflinux.com: Linux has come a long way and today it is ready to be used by non technical users as well. A lot of individuals are not happy with Windows and are looking for an alternative. The problem is that because these users are not very interested in computers, they are not aware of Linux as an alternative.

Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 5 - A Few Quick Comments

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Alpha 5 - A Few Quick Comments
  • Canonical adds Advanced Ubuntu Service and Support Offering
  • New Look for Ubuntu Network Installs
  • Karmic Koala: The Trainwreck Around the Bend
  • Ubuntu Related Links

64-Bit Upgrade by Way of Open Source Isn't Bump-Free

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: In the wake of analyst Andrew Garcia's Windows 7 64-bit migration woes, Labs' Jason Brooks considers the bumps he's encountered on his own journey to 64-bit on Ubuntu Linux.

Scientific Linux: A Distro For More Than Labs

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Here's further proof there really is a Linux distribution for every need out there: Scientific Linux. The name alone should speak volumes about its intent and design, but as always there's more under the hood.

ZaReason's New Linux Netbook

Filed under
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: Cathy and Earl Malmrose founded ZaReason several years ago. ZaReason is a Linux OEM that has long intrigued me for a number of reasons: they encourage customers to open their boxes and tinker, they specialize in OEM Linux boxes, and they demonstrate that there is still room for independent shops in the rough-and-tumble world of computer retailing.

New Red Hat Linux's top five features

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Red Hat has released its latest version of its flagship operating system RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) 5.4 and there's a lot to like in this new business Linux.

The GNU/Linux Desktop and Borrowed Assumptions about Usability

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Is the GNU/Linux desktop headed in the right direction? Recently, I have started to wonder.

My Arch Linux Experiment (Part 1)

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: I decided to review Arch Linux and give it a score just as I do everything else. However, Arch Linux isn’t like most distributions. The mission is simple. I decided to see if I can duplicate my existing Kubuntu set up into Arch Linux.

Fedora, good and bad

Filed under
Linux

flameeyes.eu: In the past few days, since I’ve been spending time at my sister’s house, I’ve used as single system the laptop I bought a few months ago, with runs Fedora 11.

Linux market share drops as Win 7 launch looms

Filed under
Linux

tgdaily.com: OS and browser stats have just been published for August, showing that Windows 7 continues to grow its market share even though it still hasn't been launched.

Slackware Linux Installed

Filed under
Slack

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I think that the first "packaged" Linux distribution that I ever tried was Slackware Linux. I haven't had much to do with Slackware in quite a few years, though. When I saw the release announcement for Slackware Linux 13.0, I happened to be working on MMS (my MultibootMiniServer), and I thought it might be interesting to try it on there.

How To Add A Splash Image To GRUB 2 On Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can add a splash image to your GRUB 2 boot loader on Ubuntu 9.04. Please note that you should use this tutorial only if you have upgraded your bootloader to GRUB 2 previously.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • A Video Editor that Just Works
  • Ubuntu certified on the latest HP Servers
  • Sutor's Red Hat Summit keynote: “Linux Everywhere?"
  • Microsoft contract forces cancellation of Stallman talk in Argentina
  • Linus Torvalds in Live Streaming from LinuxCon
  • Red Hat Announces Enhancements to Red Hat Enterprise Linux Management Solutions
  • Put Trading Swells on Red Hat (RHT)
  • Metadata Performance of Four Linux File Systems
  • msec future and plans
  • Hunt for the perfect Operating System
  • Enterprise windows and Linux destops. Is it possible?
  • Kindle Hacking: It's a "lovely little Linux box"
  • A Few Details On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Linux Outlaws 109 - Saturday Light Live
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 1 Episode 16

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Create a Bootable FreeDOS USB Drive on Linux With UNetbootin
  • How To: Upgrade Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 to v5.4
  • Locating Your Laptop With Dynamic DNS
  • Easy way to use any DialUP modem Without WVDIAL in Ubuntu/Linux
  • Ubuntu Dual Boot Install
  • Record screencasts to animated GIF files
  • Howto: Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows on RAID 10
  • Encrypting your private data - Part 2
  • Exclude Websites From Appearing In The Firefox Address Bar
  • Make your own Wayback Machine or Time Machine in GNU/Linux with rsnapshot
  • How To Fix The KStars Broken Package in Kubuntu 9.04 (KDE 4.3)
  • Firefox Can’t Find Acobat Reader In Your Home Directory (Linux)

CrossOver Games 8.0, Now With Zombie-Plague Protection

Filed under
Software
Gaming

ostatic.com/blog: It's been a while since CodeWeavers updated CrossOver Games and today's release of version 8.0 is a doozy.

openSUSE-LXDE live CD now ready

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Yes, that’s true! After some develop and tests i finally completed the openSUSE-LXDE live installable iso based on openSUSE 11.1 made with SUSE-STUDIO.

Should the Gates Foundation support Mac, Linux PCs

computerworld.com: The Gates Foundation has done a commendable job for the past ten years installing Windows computers in public libraries around the country. While the purpose of these donated computers was not to maintain and expand Windows market share, the net effect of this philanthropy has been to do just that.

10 Linux file managers worth checking out

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’ve never given your file manager much thought, maybe it’s time to look at the wide range of features offered by Linux file management tools.

Murphy's Law: Open-Source Should Go Unrewarded

Filed under
OSS

maximumpc.com: Why do open-source programs win awards? Or, rather, what is it about open-source that makes us so prone to dishing out accolades--as if the very nature of a program being open-source somehow makes it indistinguishable from any other common application you can use. Why do we keep giving the same programs the same awards?

Interview with Eric Hameleers: Why You Should Try Slackware

Filed under
Interviews
Slack

linux-mag.com: Linux Magazine spoke with Eric Hameleers (known as Alien BOB) about the 64-bit port and why users should consider switching to Slackware. As Eric discusses, this 64-bit release came from a ground up approach which has even managed to benefit the 32-bit build in the process.

Also: Continued Amazement

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE