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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 06 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • An rsync primer

  • Make Sudo Applications Beautiful
  • How to reduce the icon size in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Adding Grub After Ubuntu Installation
  • Turn Thunderbird into a Full-Blown PIM with Lightning
  • Diff Two Directories
  • Regular Expressions in Python 3
  • Linux tip: How to run multiple X sessions
  • Discwrapper - Design CD/DVD covers and labels for your personal discs
  • BleachBit - Cleans unnecessary files to free disk space and maintain privacy
  • openSUSE 11.1 - The Workarounds
  • Gentoo Cache Mirror using apache and php
  • Understanding automatic blank Pages in Open Office
  • Mail Merge in Openoffice.org: Everything You Need to Know

Linux Succumbs to Creeping Windows-Itis

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: I've been using Linux since 1995, and while that doesn't quite elevate me to grizzled geekbeard status, it's long enough to have observed a whole lot of growth and changes. Most of them are good; but some of them are rather alarming.

KDE 4.1.4 and 4.2 Release Candidate Available Now

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE community has made available two new releases of the KDE desktop and applications today. KDE 4.1.4 is the latest update for the KDE 4.1 series. KDE 4.2 RC is the release candidate of KDE 4.2.

Where have all the community managers gone?

Filed under
Linux
OSS

blogs.the451group: As we have seen open source vendors trimming headcount just like many other companies in search of controlling costs and weathering the storm during recent months, community managers seem to be on the line among the layoffs.

Also: building a community around your F/OSS project

The Secret Lives of Ubuntu and Debian Users

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Using free and open source software (FOSS), advocates like to say, is not a popularity contest. It's about doing what's right. However, the Debian and Ubuntu Popularity Contest projects might disagree.

Linux Powers New Security System

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: French security company M2M Solution has developed a security gateway device called Homebox to monitor your home, office, vehicle, and even your pets while you're out.

Firefox to use Chrome-like tabs

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: Mozilla has announced a subtle but significant change to Firefox, tweaking the way tabs work on the browser.

Audio system taps Linux, 802.11n

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Cisco's Linksys division is shipping a networked home audio distribution system that runs Linux and uses 802.11n WiFi. The Cisco Wireless Home Audio system supports Internet radio and DLNA discovery, and includes a variety of receivers, speakers, players, iPOD docks, and a tablet-like touchscreen remote.

Whither Fedora?

Filed under
Linux

technologytales.com: I suppose that the calm is also a reflection of the fact that Ubuntu has matured but there is a sense that some changes may be on the horizon. For one thing, there are the opinions of a certain Mark Shuttleworth but the competition is progressing too.

Ubuntu 9.04 Boots in 21.4 Seconds

Filed under
Ubuntu

news.softpedia: There are only two days left until the third Alpha version of the upcoming Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) will be available (for testing), and... we couldn't resist the temptation to take the current daily build for a test drive.

10 Linux RSS fead readers

Filed under
Software

linuxnongeek.com: RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication (but also sometimes refers to Rich Site Summary or RDF Site Summary). It is an XML-based format for sharing and distributing web content. Here I compiled a list with the best (IMO) 10 RSS readers for Linux:

Ubuntu 8.10 upmc for the Asus EeePC? Don't bother, just install the full distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I discovered recently the truth of the old saying that necessity is the mother of invention. Yes, I finally did it. I bricked my beloved EeePc. I had just installed the Smart package manager and a subsequent reboot saw me stuck in, well, an eternal boot loop.

Free Software or Open Source? You Choose

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: “Free software” or “open source”? It's a perennial question that has provoked a thousand flame wars. Normally, the factions supporting each label and its assocated theoretical baggage manage to work alongside each other for the collective good with only a minimal amount of friction. But occasionally, the sparks begin to fly.

Linux institutionalized, a little look back

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Linux as an Operating System, not just a specific distribution, but all of them. The collective. has been an institution in and of itself for several years now in the server world. Linux and FOSS server software together has developed a dominating presence in the business/server world.

7 Great Free/Open-source Platform Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.com: A platform game (also known as platformer) is a video game genre distinguished by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. I have here a list of some great free and open source platform games that you may enjoy.

MAMPU OSCC achieves savings of RM40m with open source

Filed under
OSS

openmalaysiablog.com: Say it with me slowly, forty million big ones. That's how much government agencies have saved by deploying open source software in favour of proprietary, and costly licensed technology in government ministries, departments and agencies.

Dell Inspiron 1525 Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Like most notebooks from Dell, the Inspiron 1525 can be customized to cater to the needs of the customer. The Dell Inspiron 1525 we were testing had an Intel Core 2 Duo T5800, 3GB of DDR2 system memory, 15.4" wide-screen 1280x800 display, Intel GMA X3100 graphics, 250GB SATA hard drive, DVD+/-RW drive, Dell Wireless 1395 802.11g, an integrated 2.0MP web-camera, and a 6-cell battery.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 54

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #54 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Bugzilla Update to 3.2, Contributor Gifts, and Miguel de Icaza: Mono goes Accessible!

5 Linux Podcasts You Should Be Listening To

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Contributing to Linux and the Open Source movement can come in many guises. Programming, filing bugs, translating, blogging, and of course podcasting! In this day and age, jumping behind a mic and speaking isn’t really hard, whats hard is actually sticking out of the clutter. Here are 5.

Join the Linux revolution

Filed under
Linux

whatpc.co.uk: You have undoubtedly heard of Linux, and as a PCW reader it’s very likely you have tried it. Only a few years ago, Linux was something largely best left to the most technically minded, to those who liked to configure and tweak their operating system and liked the idea of free software. That’s not true any more.

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More in Tux Machines

Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C. T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, both of which are based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, has advanced to a more powerful Rockchip SoC for its new open spec Firefly-RK3399. The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 features two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz. This appears to be the first RK3399 SBC and the first SBC to include Cortex-A72 cores. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • Manuskript is a Promising Open-Source Scrivener Alternative
    Whether you plan to work on a book, a screenplay, or better structure your dissertation, you’ll probably see apps like Scrivener recommended. If you’re running Windows, macOS or even Android then you’re spoilt for choice, with various competing proprietary apps at varying price points readily available. On Linux the choices are somewhat limited.
  • Tor 0.2.9 Is Just Around the Corner As 0.2.8.10 Fixes Memory Leak in OpenSSL 1.1
    The past weekend brought us new stable and development builds of the Tor anonymity network project, versioned 0.2.8.10, as the most advanced version out there, and 0.2.9.6 RC (Release Candidate).
  • Pitivi 0.98 Linux Video Editor Adds Customizable Keyboard Shortcuts
    Version 0.98 of the GNOME-aligned GStreamer-powered Pitivi non-linear video editor was tagged today as the newest development milestone. The main feature addition of Pitivi 0.98 is now supporting customizable keyboard supports! Aside from finally supporting customizable keyboard shortcuts for this open-source video editor, a lot of warnings were fixed from GTK 3.22, and there has been a lot of other bug fixing. Bugs around Pitivi's timeline were primarily targeted by this release.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana Officially Released
    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8.0 is now available as the latest version of our open-source, fully-automated, reproducible benchmarking software for Linux, BSD, Solaris, macOS, Windows, and other operating systems. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 is the latest stable release now of our GPL-licensed benchmarking software updated on its regular quarterly release cadence. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 development focused on a number of low-level improvements to particularly benefit Phoromatic and the Phodevi (Phoronix Device Interface) software/hardware library abstraction layer.
  • iPerf As Another Network Benchmark Is Now Available Via The Phoronix Test Suite
  • Chromium-Based Vivaldi 1.6 Browser Enters Development, Brings Tab Stack Renaming
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard informs us about the availability of a new snapshot for the cross-platform, Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser, which promises to let users name tab stacks. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.6.682.3 marks the beginning of the development of Vivaldi 1.6, the next major version of the popular web browser, and it looks like it has been rebased on Chromium 55.0.2883.64. Besides fixing a bunch of regressions, the new development release implements an option under Settings -> Tabs -> Tab Features -> Tab stacking -> Allow Tab Stack Renaming, which lets you rename or name tab stacks.

today's howtos