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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU Guile 2.1.1 released [beta] Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 2:30am
Story DAQ SBC runs Linux on Zynq, offers FMC expansion Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 2:18am
Story Is Google spinning a merged Chrome/Android OS for laptops? Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 2:14am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 1:46am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 12:57am
Story Linux 4.4 Getting Persistent Reservation API For Block Devices Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 12:47am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 12:35am
Story CoreOS Debuts Tectonic, a Commercial Kubernetes Distro Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2015 - 12:08am
Story Koozali SME Server 8.2 Release Notes Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2015 - 11:43pm
Story SteamOS Is Now Ready for Launch with Updates to Linux Kernel 4.1 and New Drivers Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2015 - 11:29pm

Installing Cherokee With PHP5 And MySQL Support On OpenSUSE 11.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

Cherokee is a very fast, flexible and easy to configure Web Server. It supports the widespread technologies nowadays: FastCGI, SCGI, PHP, CGI, TLS and SSL encrypted connections, virtual hosts, authentication, on the fly encoding, load balancing, Apache compatible log files, and much more. This tutorial shows how you can install Cherokee on an OpenSUSE 11.3 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.

Review: CrunchBang ("#!") Linux 10 "Statler" Openbox r20110105

Filed under
Linux

dasublogbyprashanth.blogspot: I've had a couple of encounters with #! before. I was pleasantly surprised by the features and minimalistic beauty of version 9.04.01, and I was later slightly let down by the relative lack of polish and removal of some features in version 10.

Simple Scan Brings Much-Needed Sanity to SANE

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linuxinsider.com: Scanners have long been a configuration nightmare for Linux machines, but the Simple Scan app can make routine, repetitive photo and document scanning chores much easier than apps like Xsane.

Spain grovels to penguins over 'Linux' anti-terror plot

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: The Spanish Ministry of the Interior has expressed its regret that an international crackdown on IT masterminds inside the violent Basque separatist group ETA was dubbed "Operation Linux".

Gentoo Linux sucks

Filed under
Gentoo

jedihawk.com: When I first installed Gentoo, I thought it was pretty good. It was not as easy as other distros (such as Ubuntu), but it gave me lots of control.

What PHP Desperately Needs

Filed under
Software

hackingthevalley.com: There is one thing PHP desperately needs — an easy to use built-in web server. Every semester, as I face a new room full of hopeful newbies, I deal with one of the major pain points of PHP development — that PHP is worthless without a web server.

Trend Micro attacks Open Source

Filed under
OSS

techeye.net: Insecurity expert Steve Chang, who is the chairman of Trend Micro, has just declared himself the sworn enemy of the Open Sauce movement by saying that Android is less secure than the iPhone because it is Open Sauce.

A Look at Ubuntu from the Other Side

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: From the user's side, that is. From the side of a whole world full of people who will eventually determine whether Linux has a future as a viable home/office alternative to Windows.

Plans for GIMP 2.8 and Beyond

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: In the face of all sorts of rumours and interpretations about the future of the project there is a call for clarification regarding development of GIMP.

Quick Look: Linux Mint Debian Edition 201101

Filed under
Linux

eyeonlinux.com: I did a full review earlier of Linux Mint Debian Edition and loved it. Now there’s an update to it and I couldn’t resist doing a quick look.

Sony takes legal action against PS3 hackers

Filed under
Legal

h-online.com: On their web sites, George Hotz, who became known for his iPhone and PS3 hacks, and the fail0verflow hacker group, have published three statements of complaint made by legal representatives of Sony Computer Entertainment America (SCEA) against Hotz and four alleged members of fail0verflow at the District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco.

Banshee May Put Ubuntu, Canonical At Risk

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Banshee May Put Ubuntu, Canonical At Risk!
  • Canonical Discusses Banshee Decision

MoonOS 4 'Neake' Review

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

cristalinux.blogspot: MoonOS, an Ubuntu based Linux distro, recently hit version 4, codenamed "Neake". This last release certainly marks a turning point for MoonOS, for it includes several drastic changes that set it appart from previous releases and even from other Linux distributions.

Linux Mint 10 Reviewed – Part #2 – It Is Only Getting Better

Filed under
Linux

lockergnome.com: In my quest to make Linux Mint 10 by sole operating system, I needed to bring over two contact lists into Mozilla Thunderbird, which is the default email software installed with Mint 10. Next, I transferred my entire Documents folder over from Windows.

Fedora 14—I’m Smiling About Laughlin

Filed under
Linux

linuxforu.com: On 2nd November, the Fedora Project released version 14 of its wildly popular GNU/Linux distribution. I’ve been eagerly awaiting a bug-free KDE, well-packaged by a distro, especially since KDE became usable again with version 4.3. I had an uncanny feeling that Fedora 14, code-named Laughlin, would be it.

Google Chrome Adds WebM Video, Drops H.264

Filed under
Software

informationweek.com: Google on Tuesday said that it plans to drop support for the H.264 video codec in its Chrome browser and to embrace WebM, the video codec that it acquired in 2009 and released last year as open source software.

Mozilla plots February Firefox 4 release

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Firefox 4 is nearly ready for showtime, according to a recent post on Mozilla's mailing list. Mozilla has around 160 hard blockers to knock down, before proceeding to Release Candidate.

Microsoft-led CPTN bid for Novell FLOSS patents is on/off/on

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.computerworld.com: CPTN Holdings' plan to purchase the Novell open source patent portfolio has been withdrawn. At least, that's what some breathless reporting would have you believe.

It's Official: Ubuntu Will Embrace the Cloud--Flexibly

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: It's official: Ubuntu version 11.04, which is coming in April and is dubbed Natty Narwhal, will flexibly support cloud computing through both OpenStack and Eucalyptus cloud platforms.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.