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Thursday, 22 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SparkyLinux 3.6 "Annagerman" Lands with LXDE, MATE, Razor-Qt, and Xfce Flavors Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2014 - 1:37am
Story Nautilus Ported To New GTK Widgets For GNOME 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2014 - 1:31am
Story Android Wear “Lollipop” First Look and Tour! Rianne Schestowitz 13/12/2014 - 1:25am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 11:20pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 11:19pm
Story European Commission Finally Engaging with Open Source? Rianne Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 10:26pm
Story 12-Way AMD Catalyst 14.12 vs. NVIDIA 346 Series Linux GPU Comparison Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 10:23pm
Story Calligra 2.8.7 is Out Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Linux 3.19 To Have Full Multi-Touch For More Logitech Devices Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 8:55pm
Story Linux Continues to Grow in the Cloud Computing and Implementation of Enterprise Applications Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 8:19pm

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mandriva 2010 backgrounds contribution
  • Nvidia Releases OpenCL Drivers
  • Great new features in OOo 3.2
  • 5 of the most popular Linux powered mobile devices of 2009
  • Open source can save schools billions
  • User Agent Switcher keeps Ubuntu usable at College
  • Rutgers using Drupal
  • More SMBs are adopting open source
  • Osmos Coming to Linux
  • Aquaria Coming to Linux
  • With Zipit, who needs a netbook?
  • Open source is a platform, not a product
  • Neterion, Intel, Red Hat Jointly Demonstrate Single Root I/O Virtualization Technology
  • So I “Hacked” My Crappy MP3 Player
  • Google's Doodles: 10 of the best including UFOs and Googlle
  • Quirky Wallpaper Series: Random NASA Wallpaper Script

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Configure Custom Shortcuts in KDE
  • Get network versatility with SSH tunneling and netcat
  • How to install / enable Java Plugin / Applets in Firefox on CentOS 5
  • Setting up FreeNX (nxserver-freenx) on Gentoo
  • How to Make Web 2.0 Work Using Open-Source Enterprise Content Management
  • Exaile, another media player for Linux
  • eyeOS: Your Own Private Linux Cloud that You Control (part 2)
  • Removing .la files, for dum^W uncertain people
  • resolv.conf options rotate and discovery of ISP DNS issue
  • Free Disk Space by Reducing Reserved Blocks Percentage
  • Working with text files in Unix/Linux (part 3/3)
  • Installation guide for eGroupware on Ubuntu Server

Linux and the Trusted Platform Module (TPM)

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: As computing and the internet become ever more a part of everyday life, reliable and strong security becomes increasingly necessary. Security is critical in the areas of business communications, online banking and online shopping, but until quite recently security has not been an integral part of the core computing hardware. Hardware manufacturers have been taking steps to rectify that by introducing the idea of trusted computing based on devices such as the Trusted Platform Module (TPM).

Velocitized by Slitaz

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Today I threw the Slitaz CD into my Thinkpad, partly as an experiment and partly just to see be reminded of what the GUI looked like on that machine, before X went and scrambled the siliconmotion driver.

Open sourcers strike back at Google cease-and-desist

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: Three days after Google told an independent developer to stop bundling proprietary applications with his alternative Android operating system, fans of the popular package have shot back with plans to work around the move.

5 Things You Can Do to Put Linux in the Driver Seat

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: I don't blame the kind volunteers that donate their time to program bits and pieces of the Linux kernel and associated programs but I do blame the hardware manufacturers for not supporting a huge user base of Linux users. I'm tired of it and it's time for action. Here's what we can do:

10 easy ways to play with Linux without leaving Windows

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: If you're still using Windows for your primary OS there are tons of ways to get your feet wet like a true penguin without making any serious commitments. Here are ten ways.

10 things that rocked the Linux world

Filed under
Linux

Much too much has happened with Linux in the last 10 years to do anything like a complete job of listing the important events and technological advances surrounding this operating system. But nevertheless here are 10 important Linux developments that have rocked the world of Linux. I'm sure you can add to this.

Google throws the ‘open’ out of ‘open-source’ by shutting down Android mod

Filed under
Google
OSS

thinkdigit.com: Well, it was nice while it lasted. With Android, Google had promised us the ideal of a truly open-source mobile operating system being headed by one of the technology world’s most influential organisations. And now, the company has gone ahead and issued a ‘Cease and Desist’ (C&D) order to one of the most popular Android mods around.

Without Free Software, Open Source Would Lose its Meaning

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: I'm a big fan of Matt Asay's writings about free software even though I have been rather dreading the appearance of one that I knew, one day, he would write...because it would be wrong. And now he has written it, with the self-explanatory headline: “Free software is dead. Long live open source.”

HD videoconferencing system runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxfordevices.com: Later this week, Panasonic Communications plans to ship a full HD videoconferencing system that incorporates embedded Linux and Nokia's Qt cross-platform development/UI framework.

Ubuntu Is Pretty Cool (My Linux Experiment)

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

sourcesandmethods.blogspot: I decided to install Ubuntu on an old laptop of mine this weekend and I feel, I have to say, more, well, resilient already. The intelligence implications are pretty interesting, too.

Ohio LinuxFest report: "Forty Years of Unix"

Filed under
Linux

lxer.com: I just got back from OhioLinuxFest "Forty Years of Unix," and I want to report on what I heard, who I saw, and what I learned.

Also: An Introduction to GNOME 3.0

Can open source monopolize a market?

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: Open source is used to playing underdog to incumbent proprietary vendors. What will happen when open source dominates, rather than commoditizes, markets?

Kernel Log - Main development phase of Linux 2.6.32 completed

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: With the first release candidate of Linux 2.6.32, last night, Linus Torvalds completed the main development phase of the next version of Linux on the main development branch.

Try Out an Unofficial, But Working, "Chrome OS"

Filed under
OS

lifehacker.com: The official, actually-made-by-Google Chrome OS won't hit netbooks until late 2010, but you can try out a custom-built Linux distribution that's somewhat stripped down and puts Google's browser at the center of everything.

Slax

Filed under
Linux

terminally-incoherent.com: I decided to do something new. I used countless live CD’s in the past, but it actually never occurred to me to try something more persistent. So I dug out my old 2GB USB stick and installed Slax.

My ideal operating system

Filed under
OS

blogs.techrepublic.com: Over the weekend I was running my usual route and doing my usual thinking…about Linux. A strange thought crossed my mind as my music-listening-device (not an iPod thank you very much) jumped from one genre of music to another: What would my ideal operating system consist of?

50 Open Source Apps for Small Biz/Home Office

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: When it comes to businesses using open source software, medium and large enterprises seem to get most of the press. However, small office/home office (SOHO) setups with 10 employees or less may see even greater benefit from switching to open source applications.

Gnome Shell… Meh

Filed under
Software

v00d00.net: Now with any major new release of GNOME you are going to get alot of “omg totally awesome new stuff in gnome!” posts. The real question is do you want it to do something new?

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More in Tux Machines

XOD: A New And Open Source Visual Programming Language For Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Etc.

However, when it comes to hardware tinkering, programming knowledge is a must. To take care of this issue, developers have been trying to create what’s called visual programming languages. Many of them are already popular, including the likes of Node-Red and NoFlo, and others are budding. One such new visual programming language for Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and other development boards is XOD. In an email sent to Fossbytes, the creators of XOD programming language told that they’ve added graphical functionality and functional reactive principles. XOD language, XOD IDE, and library sources will be open sourced and published on GitHub once it’s launched. Read more

8 ways to contribute to open source when you have no time

One of the most common reasons people give for not contributing (or not contributing more) to open source is a lack of time. I get it; life is challenging, and there are so many priorities vying for your limited attention. So how can you find the time in your busy life to contribute to the open source projects you care about? In the interest of full disclosure, I should warn you that I was late getting this article to the editors because I couldn't find the time to work on it. Take my advice at your own risk. Read more

Norway register shares dataset tools as open source

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Security: Brutal Kangaroo Targets Windows, Linux Updates Available, Reproducible Builds, and Patching Stack Clash

  • Brutal Kangaroo
    Today, June 22nd 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the Brutal Kangaroo project of the CIA. Brutal Kangaroo is a tool suite for Microsoft Windows that targets closed networks by air gap jumping using thumbdrives. Brutal Kangaroo components create a custom covert network within the target closed network and providing functionality for executing surveys, directory listings, and arbitrary executables. The documents describe how a CIA operation can infiltrate a closed network (or a single air-gapped computer) within an organization or enterprise without direct access. It first infects a Internet-connected computer within the organization (referred to as "primary host") and installs the BrutalKangaroo malware on it. When a user is using the primary host and inserts a USB stick into it, the thumbdrive itself is infected with a separate malware. If this thumbdrive is used to copy data between the closed network and the LAN/WAN, the user will sooner or later plug the USB disk into a computer on the closed network. By browsing the USB drive with Windows Explorer on such a protected computer, it also gets infected with exfiltration/survey malware. If multiple computers on the closed network are under CIA control, they form a covert network to coordinate tasks and data exchange. Although not explicitly stated in the documents, this method of compromising closed networks is very similar to how Stuxnet worked. The Brutal Kangaroo project consists of the following components: Drifting Deadline is the thumbdrive infection tool, Shattered Assurance is a server tool that handles automated infection of thumbdrives (as the primary mode of propagation for the Brutal Kangaroo suite), Broken Promise is the Brutal Kangaroo postprocessor (to evaluate collected information) and Shadow is the primary persistence mechanism (a stage 2 tool that is distributed across a closed network and acts as a covert command-and-control network; once multiple Shadow instances are installed and share drives, tasking and payloads can be sent back-and-forth).
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Reproducible Builds: week 112 in Stretch cycle
  • 5 things you need to know about Stack Clash to secure your shared Linux environment
    The vulnerability is present in Unix-based systems on i386 and amd64 architectures. Affected Linux distributions include Red Hat, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE, CentOS and Gentoo. Solaris is owned by Oracle. FreeBSD, OpenBSD and NetBSD are also impacted. Qualys has been working with distributions and vendors since May to get the vulnerabilities fixed, and the updates are just beginning to be released. Administrators need to act promptly to update affected machines with the security updates.