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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 16 OEM Has Been Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:27pm
Story Linux Kernel News Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 7:04pm
Story Fact sheet: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 1:18pm
Story UK citizen sues Microsoft over Prism private data leak to NSA Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 11:51am
Story Piixl Jetpack Steam Machine Attaches to the Back Your TV Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 11:42am
Story Ubuntu to include torrent search in Dash search Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:04am
Story Linutop 5 is a fanless, Linux mini-desktop (without outdated specs) Rianne Schestowitz 05/12/2013 - 11:13pm
Story Send in the clones: Oracle, CentOS catch up to Red Hat Linux 6.5 Rianne Schestowitz 05/12/2013 - 10:49pm
Story Will you buy a Steam Machine for $499? Rianne Schestowitz 05/12/2013 - 9:52pm
Story Quad-Monitor AMD/NVIDIA Linux Gaming: What You Need To Know Rianne Schestowitz 05/12/2013 - 9:40pm

Introducing Ubiquity

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.com: You’re writing an email to invite a friend to meet at a local San Francisco restaurant that neither of you has been to. You’d like to include a map. Today, this involves the disjointed tasks of message composition on a web-mail service, mapping the address on a map site, searching for reviews on the restaurant on a search engine, and finally copying all links into the message being composed. Enter Ubiquity.

Vista FUD?

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxfud.wordpress: It is interesting to see the tides turning though. The press used to be full of “Microsoft Does It Again!” and “Is Linux Really Ready?” stories. Now, it is Microsoft’s turn.

The FLA Gets Some Traction

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: Have you ever heard of the Fiduciary Licence Agreement - the FLA? No, it's not an alterative to other free and open source license agreements that you're probably already familiar with, like the GPL, Mozilla License, and BSD License. Rather, it's an adjunct to any copyleft license.

Linux radio keeps it simple

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Pure has announced an Internet radio that runs embedded Linux and provides FM and DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) playback. The Evoke Flow radio offers WiFi connectivity and media streaming from a connected PC, and is paired with a Internet search portal called the Pure Lounge.

Frag 'em in your own backyard with Sauerbraten

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: If like first-person shooters, you'll love Sauerbraten. Sauerbraten blends the best of FPSes like Quake and Max Payne to give you a unique gaming experience.

10 fundamental differences between Linux and Windows

Filed under
OS

bogs.techrepublic.com: I have been around the Linux community for more than 10 years now. From the very beginning, I have known that there are basic differences between Linux and Windows that will always set them apart. This is not, in the least, to say one is better than the other. It’s just to say that they are fundamentally different.

How to Use Linux in 5 Simple Steps

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: "How to use Linux" --According to Google Trends, a lot of people have been using this phrase to get information on learning how to use Linux. Because of this, I decided to write my own simplified "how to" for those who are already in the right mood to finally try Linux.

Performance Problems Plague Perl on Red Hat

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: A major problem with the officially distributed version of Perl on Red Hat Enterprise Linux has led to a firestorm of complaints among developers. The problem, which also manifests itself on some versions of the Fedora and CentOS Linux distributions, means that some programs will take more than 100 (yes, one hundred) times longer to execute under Red Hat than other distributions.

Review: antiX Mepis 7.5 'Toussaint Louverture'

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: As a live CD antiX is quite superb: It loads very quickly, runs really smoothly and has enough software to keep me productive. The basics are covered with applications.

KDE 3.5.10 Updates Kicker and KPDF

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE community has finalised another update to the 3.5 series. While not a very exciting release, 3.5.10 brings numerous bugfixes and translation updates.

How To Set Up WebDAV With Lighttpd On Mandriva 2008.1

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

Amarok, the music player that does it all

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: For a time, GNU/Linux music library tools seemed to be, well, non-existent. Sure, XMMS was an awesome media player. But if you wanted to catalog your music, you were out of luck. Apple users had iTunes and were always rubbing it into the free software world’s face. Even Microsoft, the sleeping Redmond giant, had upgraded Windows Media Player to include a library feature. Then, a giant wolf named Amarok charged to the rescue.

Distro flood ahead

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: With October just over a month away Linux fans can look forward to a sudden flurry of releases from the major Linux distributors.

Fedora 8 Re-Spin Comes with Many Fixes

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: Although Fedora 10 is nearing its release date, The Fedora Unity Project has announced the availability of the latest ISO Re-Spins (DVD Sets) for Fedora 8.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • 2.6.27-rc4, "Random Stuff All Over"

  • Judge, attorneys discuss Reiser plea deal
  • Who writes Linux? (And how you can too!)
  • ASUS launches "Eee Download" service, forgets the "installation" part
  • Novell's iPrint open to attack, say researchers
  • Which merchants benefit most from open source?
  • openSUSE at Utah Open Source Conference
  • A proposed revised Fedora 10 schedule
  • Open Source Drives Continued IT Market Growth
  • South American FOSS show is a big deal
  • Picturing Linux vs. Windows security
  • Ubuntu issues security patch for kernel flaw
  • Standards and Conversations, Part 2
  • Desktop Linux proves its mettle in emerging markets

Firefox 2 about to get a major update

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: Starting a little later tonight, users with the latest version of Firefox 2 will be getting an offer to update to Firefox 3. If you’re running Firefox 2.0.0.17 you will see the offer in the next couple of days, though if you’re eager you can always “Check for Updates” in the “Help” menu.

Also: Mozilla Firefox browser gets security boost

Integrating Linux into the SME

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: This article summarizes the experiences of one small- to medium-sized enterprise (SME) using a heterogeneous mix of Linux and Windows XP systems. Written by the founder of an international PC distributor, it compares and contrasts various Linux-based distributions, and assesses their suitability for business use.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: change the device names of hard disks in Ubuntu 8.04

  • Anatomy of Linux dynamic libraries
  • How-To: Compile and Install SMPlayer 0.6.2 in Debian Lenny
  • Useful Firefox 3 Configuration Tweaks
  • 10 Useful Ubuntu Keyboard Shortcuts That You Might Not Know
  • Serving Music with mt-dappd
  • How to keep your real email address secret
  • Introduction to parallel boot under Mandriva
  • OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part III

A modest Linux USB suggestion

Filed under
Hardware

practical-tech.com: Did you know that there are two basic kinds of USB 2.0 drives? I didn’t. But, now thanks to Robert L. Scheier’s article, Not all USB drives are created equal, I now know that are significant differences between drives. And, in particular those differences matter a lot to live USB capable Linux distributions like Fedora 9.

5 KDE3 Applications I Need on a Daily Basis

Filed under
Software

50webs.org: A review of 5 KDE3 applications which I use daily on my Debian Lenny box: BasKet, Amarok, K3b, KTorrent, Yakuake.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box