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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Satellite 6 Adds More Control For Red Hat Linux Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:58pm
Story Steam Linux Usage Was Up Slightly In June Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 7:46pm
Story KDE’s Krita gets 100% funding through Kickstarter Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 6:19pm
Story HP and Canonical Document OpenStack Cloud Deployment for Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 2:05pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.2.3-25 Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 3.14.7 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 2:00pm
Story Calculate Linux 13.19 released Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 1:56pm
Story antiX 14.2 MX Linux Distribution Brings LibreOffice 4.2.5 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:07am
Story Where KDE is going - Part 2 Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 10:01am
Story Samsung announces Galaxy S5 mini, retains S5 gimmicks Rianne Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:34am
Story Will Bitcoin’s regulatory future resemble Linux? Roy Schestowitz 02/07/2014 - 9:21am

Free Online Book On Blender: Solid 3D Rendering/Animation Lessons

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: One of the great things about open source platforms and applications is that skilled authors often put free books online as guides.

Firefox inches towards 50%, Safari holds steady

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: These are the kind of stats that should make the Mozilla folks very happy. According to W3Schools data, Firefox climbed to 46.4% in February, while the various versions of IE dropped by 1.2% to 43.6%.

"man pages" and why to use them - and in text format too

Filed under
Software

linux-hardcore.com: This is for you new to Linux users out there who are still not sure about things and are a bit panicky with the "CLI", "Command Line Interface." Go slow, ask questions, and above all, when in doubt: check the "man pages"

Hands-on: GNOME 2.26 brings incremental improvements

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: GNOME 2.26, the latest version of the open source desktop environment for Linux, has been released. Ars pranced through the garden with the new GNOME release and found that it delivers some nice incremental improvements.

Mind mapping application for Linux

Filed under
Software

stefanoforenza.com: Xmind is an Eclipse based application, which can run on any platform. So, yeah, not just Linux, but - stumbling on their website - I was pretty much surprised to find out that a .deb download option has been care taken of.

GNOME 2.26's 5 Best Features

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld.com: I started running GNOME 2.26 on the Ubuntu 9.04 alpha a few days ago, and I've been pleasantly surprised. While the Ubuntu 9.04 alpha 6 is still very much a work in progress, GNOME 2.26 manages to run like a charm on it.

KDE Brainstorm: Get Your Ideas Into KDE

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: In an effort to bridge the gap between users and developers, the KDE Community Forums have launched a new initiative to coordinate feature requests. A new "Brainstorm" section has been created.

100 tips to help you work smarter with Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: The beauty of using Firefox is the control that it extends to users, and there are almost limitless ways that it can be tweaked. Here are our 100 favourite tips, tweaks and add-ons to get the most from your favourite browser.

Will Microsoft Abandon Windows to Compete with Linux?

Filed under
Microsoft

daniweb.com/blogs: As much as Microsoft loves to grinch about Linux, they've made significant changes over the years to compete with it--and will abandon it altogether to maintain their competitive edge. Windows 7 will be the last Windows product.

25 Mythical and Humorous Facts About Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Many people considered Linus Torvalds as the world's greatest computer programmer/hacker. For those of you who want to know more about Torvalds, perhaps you may want to read these mythical and rather humorous facts about the man:

Das Boot

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaters.blogspot: Here's something silly. It seems like y'all are concentrating on boot times these days. Boot in 20 seconds! no, 15 seconds! no 10 seconds! Why the **** do I care?

Review: Dream Linux 3.5

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Dream Linux, the dream of every new user, or at least the distro that's a dream to use has taken another jump forward and released a newer version. But as with every new version, questions remain as to how well the new version stacks up against the older ones. And how does this one do against it's predecessors? Let's find out.

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - A lovely distro

Filed under
PCLOS

dedoimedo.com: PCLinuxOS is dubbed the "distro hopper-stopper" by its fans. Not without a good reason, I must say, because PCLinuxOS aims and succeeds at being radically simple [sic], friendly to new users as well as Linux geeks, easy to configure and manage, and packaging all you might need from your computer.

Can Red Hat Linux make the desktop pay?

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: Microsoft's dismissive attitude of VDI, or virtual desktop infrastructure, is very similar to Red Hat's stance toward the desktop as a viable Linux commercial offering. Red Hat has said it has yet to figure out how to capitalise on the Linux desktop as a product, but now seems to be finding a way.

New firewall for the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The Netfilter development team's Patrick McHardy has released an alpha version of nftables, a new firewall implementation for the Linux kernel, with a user space tool for controlling the firewall.

Open-Source ATI Graphics In Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Ubuntu 9.04 (the Jaunty Jackalope) will be released towards the end of next month and it is picking up the Linux 2.6.28 kernel, GNOME 2.26, and other improvements like install-time support for the EXT4 file-system and some subtle improvements.

Firefox May Already Be Dead

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: This is an exciting time for Web browsers. Google Chrome is now available in alpha for Linux, and I downloaded it for Ubuntu.

Gaming in Linux

Filed under
Gaming

brajeshwar.com: Currently, Linux might not have as many games as Windows probably has but fact that Linux has a strong community of developers in its periphery shows a better future.

Xandros Presto: A Commercial Distribution You Might Appreciate

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: I agree with pavs when he wrote “How Not To Make a Commercial Linux Distribution”, but there are still some ideas and concepts out there that might be worth paying for.

PCLinuxOS 2009.1

Filed under
PCLOS
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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]