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Wednesday, 24 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Mandriva Family Expands With the Release of OpenMandriva Lx 2013.0 Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:46pm
Story GNOME 3.10.2 Has Been Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:31pm
Story Pear OS Helps Apple’s OS Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:27pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:02pm
Story Task Coach Keeps You on Target and in Control Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 9:21pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 9:18pm
Story Ubuntu 14.04 LTS to Get Stunning Icon Theme and It's Not Flat - Screenshot Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 9:02pm
Story Intel demos 64-bit version of Android on Atom processor Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:52pm
Story Black Lab Linux 4.1.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:43pm

4 Ways To Play Windows Game On Linux

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Playing Windows games on Linux is not really a difficult task. Most gamers are reluctant to migrate to Linux because they have this misconception that Windows games cannot be played on Linux. How wrong they are. If you are one of those avid gamers that I mentioned above, here are 4 ways that you can play Windows games on Linux.

The LXF Test: OpenSolaris 2008.05

Filed under
OS

linuxformat.co.uk: Sun is battling hard to break into the open source operating system world with OpenSolaris. Juliet Kemp takes it for a test-drive, sampling its unique features and seeing how it fares against Linux...

Debunking Myths That Say Linux Won’t Reach the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

codingexperiments.com: Every couple of weeks, I’ll hear someone or read a blog post that says that Linux will never reach mainstream desktop users. I completely disagree.

NVIDIA 177.67 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It has been a few weeks since NVIDIA last pushed out a Linux display driver update (173.14.12), but this morning already they have pushed out a new update. The just-released NVIDIA 177.67 display driver doesn't introduce OpenGL 3.0 support or any other major features, but it does look to resolve a number of bugs.

Linutop 2.2: A desktop where smaller is better

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linux.com: A shift from multi-core power-gobbling monsters toward whisper-quiet systems with single-digit power consumption is rippling through the desktop market. This trend plays right into the hands of a Paris-based company called Linutop, which offers a miniature Linux-based desktop system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Asking the right questions of open source

  • Rocks clusters make sense for educational environments
  • 42 of the Best Free Linux Scientific Software
  • Sifting open-source "wheat" from the "chaff"
  • NVIDIA's OpenGL 3.0 Linux Driver?
  • Hardware Review: Tekkeon TekCharge MP1550
  • Alternate Ubuntu logos
  • Strange Skype Network Activity - Even on Linux
  • Torvalds to kernel hopefuls: Think 'trivial'
  • Torvalds: No picnic to become major Linux coder
  • 64-bit Application Thread Creation Performance
  • The Brampton Factor: Analysts fail on open source
  • Standards and Conversations, Part 1
  • Transparency is just as important
  • Undervolt your notebook CPU for longer battery life
  • Hibernation in Slackware 12.1: It Actually Works
  • Review: Hacking Exposed Linux, Third Edition

Debian Project News - August 18th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 9th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include:

  • Debian turns 15

  • 8th annual Debian Conference finished
  • Freespire 5 to be based on Debian
  • ... and much more.

Is the “killer app” argument dead?

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: The other day I was talking with a bunch of other tech heads about the ongoing Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux market share war and why. “It all revolves around killer apps,” pipes up one of the tech heads. “The problem with both Apple and Linux is that neither OS has a compelling killer app driving the user base.”

A tour of Empathy IM client

Filed under
Software

opencomputer.net: Listed on the roadmap to Gnome 2.24 is the integration with Empathy, a multi-protocol IM client. For this article I tested Empathy to see how it works and if it is better or worse then Pidgin (currently my favorite IM client).

Linux and Web 2.0: the Killer Combo

Filed under
Linux
Web

blogs.computerworld.com: I have noticed that Linux is a hot topic on Digg right now. The OS - and, let's face it, Linux is easier to define when we just view it as an OS - has been gaining momentum ever since Windows Vista turned into a nightmare for Microsoft.

Also: Why 'Cloud Computing' Is for the Birds
And: Desktop Linux as a Service: Will it Work?

BackTrack4 chooses Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

emanuele-gentili.com: It is a Linux distribution distributed as a Live CD which resulted from the merger of WHAX and the Auditor Security Collection. I talked with Mati Aharoni about new release now in developement, and he said to me that has made the decision to abandon slackware for Ubuntu in next BackTrack version (4).

Leaked: Dell Inspiron 910 (Mini Note) Specs and Release Date

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: A few weeks ago we ran some rumored specs of Dell's answer to the Eee, the Dell Inspiron 910 (aka Mini Inspiron and Inspiron Mini). Now we've gotten our hands on the full (internal) 910 web documentation.

And: Linux netbook uses Chinese chip

Music Education With Linux Sound Tools, Redux

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Four years ago I wrote an article for the Linux Journal about my use of Linux software for music instruction. A lot has changed since then, so I thought I should update that article to reflect my current use of Linux in my work as a music teacher. I'll follow the presentation of materials as I organized it in the original article, but first I'll share some observations about the changing nature of my trade.

building the complete browser for everyone everywhere

Filed under
Moz/FF

0xdeadbeef.com: Since Stuart landed the Qt port into mozilla-central the other day and Ryan Paul wrote an article on Qt and Mozilla I thought it might be worth it to add some context to that work.

Acer Aspire One A110

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Thankfully, Acer has taken a slightly more restrained view of what constitutes an SCC. Its Aspire One is available in just three basic flavours. On the desk in front of us, we have the least expensive, most basic model, the 8GB and Linux in MacBook-envy white, the most pure iteration of the SCC concept to date, in our opinion.

Ubuntu goes enterprise

Filed under
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Ubuntu is well known in user circles as the cool kids' Linux. It's available pre-installed on PCs and laptops from Dell and from numerous smaller computer vendors. What Ubuntu hasn't been known as is a Linux distribution that matters to CIOs and IT managers. Things are changing.

Mark Surman: New Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler: I’m thrilled to announce that Mark Surman is joining the Mozilla Foundation as our new Executive Director. Mark joins us after a long period of getting to know — and being known by — Mozilla contributors.

9 Linux Myth Debunked

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: When it comes to Linux there are 3 kinds of people, those who never heard of it, those who are afraid of it, and those who hate it and spread falsities about it. I don’t really care about the first, they probably aren’t really technologically literate anyways, as long as they have E-mail they are content. While the second group is the result of the actions of the third. Let’s hit two birds with one stone shall we?

Also: Linux Myth #2 - Linux is more difficult to install

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part II

  • Short Tip: Ignore files in svn
  • zypper feature: source and automatic build dependencies install
  • How to install advanced desktop effects in ubuntu
  • Keeping your Home Directory Organized
  • Cook your RAW photos into JPEG with Linux
  • Enabling Multiple CPUs (SMP) in Ubuntu
  • Free your IPODS (on Linux)
  • Bash Files

Ubuntu at Toyota

Filed under
Ubuntu

zen.org: I’m waiting a few hours at the Thompson Toyota, my Prius is getting some minor work done to it to pass state inspection, it still takes a few hours. I wiggle the mouse, and up pops the Ubuntu Heron! Wow!

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS content management systems (CMS)

  • How to Resolve Your Open Content Management Quandary
    After years of development and competition, open source content management systems (CMS) have proliferated and are very powerful tools for building, deploying and managing web sites, blogs and more. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue. The good news is that free, sophisticated guides for evaluating CMS systems have flourished. There are even good options for trying open CMS systems online before you choose one. Here, in this newly updated post, you'll find some very good resources. he first thing to pursue as you evaluate CMS systems to deploy, including the many free, good platforms, is an overview of what is available. CMSMatrix.org is a great site for plotting out side-by-side comparisons of what CMS systems have to offer. In fact, it lets you compare the features in over 1200 content management system products. Definitely take a look. This site also has a good overview of the options.
  • Postleaf is an open-source blogging platform for the design-conscious
    Content management systems are boring until you have to use one. You can install a little Drupal or WordPress, pick up some Squarespace, or just dump to Medium, the graveyard for posts about protein shakes and VC funding. But what if you could roll your own CMS? And what if you made it really cool? That’s what Cory LaViska did. LaViska is the founder of SurrealCMS and has been making it easy to edit stuff on the web for nine years. Rather than build and sell an acceptable CMS, however, he took all of his best ideas and made a far better CMS. And he made it open source and called it Postleaf.

Linux Devices

  • The Raspberry Pi and Docker Have a Bright Future Together
    As we've noted here before, when it comes to top open source stories of the past couple of years, it's clear that one of the biggest is the proliferation of tiny, inexpensive Linux-based computers at some of the smallest form factors ever seen. The diminutive, credit card-sized Raspberry Pi, which has been priced at only $25 and $35, has grabbed most of the headlines in this space, and came out this year in a new version with a more powerful 64-bit CPU, and, for the first time, built-in wireless functionality. Now, the Pi is taking on Docker smarts. If you want to work with Docker on your Raspberry Pi, all you need is Hypriot OS, a new Debian derivative designed to run Docker on the Pi.
  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Gallium3D Makes More Progress With NIR, Camera DMA-BUF
    Broadcom's Eric Anholt has written another weekly blog post covering improvements he made over the past week to the VC4 open-source graphics driver that's known as being the driver for Raspberry Pi devices.
  • Wireless-crazed IoT gateway runs on ARM or x86 Qseven COMs
    Congatec unveiled a modular, Linux-ready IoT gateway built around its Qseven COMs, providing connectivity links including 2x GBE, 6x USB, and 3x mini-PCIe.

Open Source History: Why Did Linux Succeed?

One of the most puzzling questions about the history of free and open source is this: Why did Linux succeed so spectacularly, whereas similar attempts to build a free or open source, Unix-like operating system kernel met with considerably less success? I don't know the answer to that question. But I have rounded up some theories, which I'd like to lay out here. First, though, let me make clear what I mean when I write that Linux was a great success. I am defining it in opposition primarily to the variety of other Unix-like operating system kernels, some of them open and some not, that proliferated around the time Linux was born. GNU HURD, the free-as-in-freedom kernel whose development began in May 1991, is one of them. Others include Unices that most people today have never heard of, such as various derivatives of the Unix variant developed at the University of California at Berkeley, BSD; Xenix, Microsoft's take on Unix; academic Unix clones including Minix; and the original Unix developed under the auspices of AT&T, which was vitally important in academic and commercial computing circles during earlier decades, but virtually disappeared from the scene by the 1990s. Read more

Red Hat goes to work on OpenStack network convergence

Red Hat has fully embraced OpenStack’s Neutron in a convergence-targeted virtualisation package. The Linux shop has released Red Hat Virtualisation 4, a package that subtly drops the reference to “Enterprise” held up until and including version 3.5 The intent seems to be for Red Hat’s virtualized Linux stack to become the platform for convergence, as opposed to merely a server density play. Read more