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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Value of Free

Filed under
OSS

goodcomputing.blogspot: How do you put a value on the products created through open source? Do you consider all the time spent crafting quality software? Take into account your own effort in advocating its use? Charge for packaging and a profit margin? How, exactly, would Best Buy have come to the conclusion that Ubuntu Linux is worth $19.99? I think the answer is fairly simple: they guessed.

Dang, Darn, Damn Small Linux!

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been looking at a very interesting variant of Linux called Damn Small Linux. Its 3 major contributors have basically taken a minimalist approach to Linux and have created a system that can provide a basic desktop running on an OS that's right around 50 Megabytes.

First few days with Mandriva 2009.0

Filed under
MDV

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: With the first few days (and couple of hundred updates) under the belt I can say a little bit more about my first impressions with the Alpha 2 release of Mandriva 2009. I started last Sunday and have been using it pretty much as the default since.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • In Memory of Uwe Thiem

  • My Perfect Desktop: Kubuntu KDE 4
  • My kid hates Linux
  • The new and improved Ubuntu QA
  • Problems with encrypted networks in Fedora
  • If you use Linux, you MUST try gLabels
  • 2.6.26 at last
  • Brasero 0.8.0 gets cover editor, new plugin and much more
  • Edimax EW-7728In 802.11n (RaLink rt2860) with Linux 2.6.26

  • Tweaking the Eee PC part 3
  • Backup GMAIL with FetchMail
  • Use Vim As A Syntax Highlighting Pager
  • Using SFDISK to backup your partition table
  • Doom3 and Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Fix
  • Screencasting from Linux/Ubuntu
  • Converting Binary Numbers To Decimal The Hard Way On Linux Or Unix

Amarok 2 alpha 1 looking strong

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The first alpha release of Amarok 2 was made available for download last week. The popular open-source music player is undergoing a significant transformation and receiving a highly anticipated update for KDE 4.

Malware on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Security

[M]alware includes not just virii, but worms, trojans and root-kits. These known and widely available tools are not the only options available to intruders either. GNU/Linux users should not have any false sense of security just based on the fact that viruses designed for exclusively for windows won't run on GNU/Linux.

Flaws found in BSD, Linux software updaters

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: The software update mechanisms used by most BSD and Linux operating systems can be tricked into installing buggy or known-to-be-compromised software on users' systems, creating serious security risks, according to new research.

An introduction to Wubi

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: The Toshiba laptop that I acquired at the start of the year is a Windows Vista box and it isn’t something with which I want to play too roughly because the OS came pre-installed on it. I still want to continue to see how Vista goes at close quarters so removing it to put Ubuntu or some other Linux distribution on there wasn’t ever going to be an option.

Enterprises still not getting full benefits of open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: We have been discussing this for weeks here, but now there’s confirmation from Forrester Research. Enterprises are not getting the full benefits of open source. The real problem, it seems to me, is they don’t understand the nature of open source.

Shuttleworth: "Apple is driving the innovation"

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

derstandard.at: At the recent GNOME Users and Developers Conference (GUADEC) in Istanbul Andreas Proschofsky had the chance to sit down with Ubuntu-founder Mark Shuttleworth to talk about the new release, but also about the Linux desktop as a whole, the strengths of Apple and possible major changes to the GNOME platform.

Looking For Software? Gnomefiles May Help!

Filed under
Web

workswithu.com: One of the classic problems that newcomers to Linux face is locating and installing software to do the work they want to accomplish. The more than 20,000 packages that Ubuntu offers up can be daunting indeed. This is where sites like Gnomefiles.com can come in. Gnomefiles is a clearing house of software built on GTK, the application toolkit that underpins the Gnome desktop that Ubuntu uses.

Web apps: the next battleground for FOSS?

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Concerned about the increasing popularity of Web applications, Marco Barulli of the Clipperz project has written one of the first detailed suggestions about how free and open source software (FOSS) should respond to the trend. Although neither Barulli nor Clipperz is well-known, his ideas are being listened to by such figures as Richard M. Stallman and Fabrizio Capobianco.

BeOS-like distro focused on content creation

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: A new Ubuntu-based Linux distribution has arrived, aimed at both Linux newbies and content creators. Boasting "out of the box" multimedia codecs, the freely downloadable PC/OS incorporates the lightweight XFCE desktop, and is said to offer a similar layout to the groundbreaking, but ultimately doomed BeOS.

Open source quality checker released

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: An open source software project, originally propped up by European Commission (EC) funds, has released an alpha version of its quality control program, Alitheia Core.

Blender 3D: Interview with Allan Brito

Filed under
Software
Interviews

packtpub.com: Blender is the open source, cross platform suite of tools for 3D creation, capable of modeling, rendering, and animating 3D environments. Packt spokesperson Meeba Abraham approached Allan Brito at the heart of this movement to understand his take on the future of Blender.

Toward an Open Source Society

Filed under
OSS

infoshop.org: One of the oldest arguments against anarchism is that it is impractical, that without central authority to keep the peons in line any large project will dissolve into chaos and disorder. Yet the open source software movement provides modern day proof that anarchism works, even when not conducted by anarchists.

ASUS Eee PC is a good option for a lightweight laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vincent Danen: The ASUS Eee PC has become a very popular sub-notebook recently and has undergone quite a few revisions since it was first introduced. Initially it had a smaller screen size and a much smaller drive capacity, but the more recent ASUS Eee PC 900 has rectified many of the perceived shortcomings of previous models.

Linux 2.6.26 Opens Up to Debugging

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: No piece of software is immune to defects, which is why it's important to use tools that help find and fix bugs. That's the idea with the new Linux 2.6.26 kernel, which is providing the Linux ecosystem with an integrated kernel debugger to help improve the open source operating system.

Mozilla insists Firefox 3.1 won't be bum note for developers

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla Corporation has claimed that the transition to Firefox 3.1 won’t be “a major pain-in-the-ass” and pledged developers will not be hit by “surprises along the way”, after royally hacking off users with the 3.0 launch.

Also: Corporations can save millions by supporting Firefox on business websites

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Student survey data shows Open Source training uptake amongst women and young people remains extreme
    Future Cert, the UK and Ireland representative for the LPI (Linux Professional Institute), is calling for more awareness of Open Source software training amongst the under 21s and especially women, which the industry is so desperately in need of. New figures from a recent Future Cert student survey reveals that the number of women and young people taking LPI Certification in Open Source computing remains extremely low. Of those questioned, 98% were male, and just 2% were female, taking an LPI exam. This figure is significantly less than an already low figure of around 15% to 17% of women in IT careers in general. It raises the question, what does the industry need to do to make an Open Source career attractive to women?
  • Quality in open source: testing CRIU
    Checkpoint/Restore In Userspace, or CRIU, is a software tool for Linux that allows freezing a running application (or part of it) and checkpointing it to disk as a collection of files. The files can then be used to restore and run the application from the point where it was frozen. The distinctive feature of the CRIU project is that it is mainly implemented in user space. Back in 2012, when Andrew Morton accepted the first checkpoint/restore (C/R) patches to the Linux kernel, the idea to implement saving and restoring of running processes in user space seemed kind of crazy. Yet, four years later, not only is CRIU working, it has also attracted more and more attention. Before CRIU, there had been other attempts to implement checkpoint/restore in Linux (DMTCP, BLCR, OpenVZ, CKPT, and others), but none were merged into the mainline. Meanwhile CRIU survived, which attests to its viability. Some time ago, I implemented support for the Test Anything Protocol format into the CRIU test runner; creating that patch allowed me to better understand the nature of the CRIU testing process. Now I want to share this knowledge with LWN readers. [...] The CRIU tests are quite easy to use and available for everyone. Moreover, the CRIU team has a continuous-integration system that consists of Patchwork and Jenkins, which run the required test configurations per-patch and per-commit. Patchwork also allows the team to track the status of patch sets to make the maintainer's work easier. The developers from the team always keep an eye on regressions. If a commit breaks a tree, the patches in question will not be accepted.
  • Open-source Wire messenger gets encrypted screen-sharing
    Chat app Wire has been rapidly adding feature as of late as it looks to gain some traction against the myriad of competitors out there. The latest trick in its arsenal is screen sharing. Now you can click on the new screen-sharing button to, well, share your screen during a call (if you’re on a desktop, that is). It works during group chats too and, as with all Wire communications, is encrypted end-to-end. Wire believes it’s the first messaging app to include end-to-end encryption.
  • SPI board election results are available
    Software in the Public Interest (SPI) has completed its 2016 board elections. There were two open seats on the board in addition to four board members whose terms were expiring. The six newly elected members of the board are Luca Filipozzi, Joerg Jaspert, Jimmy Kaplowitz, Andrew Tridgell, Valerie Young, and Martin Zobel-Helas. The full results, including voter statistics, are also available.
  • SFK 2016 - Call for Speakers
    Software Freedom Kosova is an annual international conference in Kosovo organized to promote free/libre open source software, free culture and open knowledge, now in its 7th edition. It is organized by FLOSSK, a non governmental, not for profit organization, dedicated to promote software freedom and related philosophies.
  • Microsoft's Next Open Source Target Could Be PowerShell: Report
  • Open-source drug discovery project advances drug development
  • The First-Ever Test of Open-Source Drug-Discovery
  • Open-Source Drug Discovery a Success
  • CNS - Open-Source Project Spurs New Drug Discoveries
    Medicines for Malaria Venture, a nonprofit group based in Geneva, Switzerland, distributed 400 diverse compounds with antimalarial activity — called the Malaria Box — to 200 labs in 30 nations in late 2011. The findings from subsequent studies and analyses were published Thursday in the journal PLOS Pathogens. Distributing the Malaria Box to various labs enabled scientists to analyze the compounds and develop findings that have led to more than 30 new drug-development projects for a variety of diseases. As a stipulation to receiving the samples, the various research groups had to deposit the information from their studies in the public domain.
  • Wire and Launchkit go open source, a water flow monitoring system, and more news
  • Apache, astsu, Biscuit, Python, Puppet 4, systemd & more!
  • The Onion Omega2: The Latest Router Dev Board
  • Build a $700 open source bionic prosthesis with new tutorial by Nicolas Huchet of Bionico
    The 3D printing community has already successfully taken over the market for cosmetic prostheses, as fantastic initiatives like E-NABLE have proven. But the world of bionics is a different place and just a handful of makers have gone there with any form of success, such as the very inspiring Open Bionics. But even 3D printed bionic prostheses are definitely within our reach, as French open source fanatic Nicolas Huchet of Bionico has proven. Though by no means a making expert himself, he 3D printed his own open source bionic hand during a three month residency at FabLab Berlin and has now shared all the files – including an extensive tutorial – online. This means you can now 3D print your very own bionic prosthesis at home for just $700.
  • BCN3D Technologies develops open source 3D printed 'Moveo' robotic arm for schools
    Designed from scratch and developed by BCN3D engineers in collaboration with the Generalitat de Catalunya’s Departament d’Ensenyament (Department of Education), the BCN3D Moveo is an Arduino Mega 2560-powered, 3D printed robotic arm which could enable schools and colleges in Spain and elsewhere to teach students the basics of robotics, mechanical design, and industrial programming. When the Departament d’Ensenyament approached BCN3D one year ago regarding the possibility of an educative robotics project, the tech organization jumped at the chance to get on board.

Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.