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Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 6:28pm
Story Still running 32 bit Ubuntu? Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 4:00pm
Story NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:56pm
Story GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:31pm
Story 3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:02pm
Story How OpenStack powers the research at CERN Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 12:05pm
Story WE’RE HOSTING AN OPENDAYLIGHT HACKFEST IN JAPAN! Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 9:05am
Story Debian Project mourns the loss of Peter Miller Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:52am
Story A Seat at the Big Kids’ Table at Ohio LinuxFest Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:36am
Story OpenStack Juno is out, Debian (and Ubuntu Trusty ports) packages ready Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:24am

Debian to adopt time-based releases

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The Debian GNU/Linux Project has decided to adopt time-based development freezes from now on, on a two-year cycle.

Ten plus years of Linux desktops.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com: Linux has been around and useable on the desktop for over ten years. So I decided to go through the internet way back machine, namely google, and look for some screenshots of Linux desktops over the last ten years.

7 Tasks You Shouldn’t Use a GUI For

Filed under
Linux

nixtutor.com: Sometimes the GUI is just too slow. Learn how to resize images, add drop shadows, splice mp3s, clone hard drives and more with the command line. Here are a few tasks that you might want to consider using the command line for.

Deactivate Location-Aware Browsing in Firefox 3.5

Filed under
Google

If the new Location-Aware Browsing (a.k.a. Geolocation) feature in Firefox 3.5 makes you worried about your privacy, you can turn the feature off with a simple about:config tweak. This "feature" allows the website you are viewing to activate the geolocation function in Firefox and discover your location.

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  1. Fun with VirtualBox

  2. 5 things Windows 7 lacks vs Linux
  3. GNU Generation: Calling all pre-university students
  4. Alfresco Community Now Available for Ubuntu
  5. about:mozilla 7/28
  6. Mr Windowspants has a bad day
  7. Free like Franks Beer
  8. Asa Dotzler: microsoft's settlement proposal
  9. OLPC: the more we know, the more we marvel
  10. Babel Com buys Everything Linux
  11. Open Source or Cloud?
  12. Top 3 Linux HTML editors
  13. The Private Cloud: Opening the Door for Open Source
  14. What is Ubuntu linux, and is it ready for me?
  15. Sexism in Free Software
  16. Ultra X Linux: Ubuntu With A Faster Kernel
  17. Music Player Review: qmmp vs audacious
  18. Automatic Mandriva Linux Media Setup
  19. gcc-4.4.1 is out
  20. NVIDIA Issues 185.xx Stable Linux Driver Update
  21. Microsoft, the GPL, and Nonsense from Folks Who Know Better
  22. Knoppix - First glance
  23. U.C. Berkeley plans open source software for lecture distribution
  24. Interview: Stephen Carlyle-Smith
  25. WASC Honeypot Opens Up With Open Source
  26. openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 81

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Mystical Magical Secure Shell, Part 1

  • Configure GRUB2 options and background
  • Keeping Time In Linux
  • System monitoring with Conky
  • How to Layout a Book with OpenOffice.org: Part 3
  • Postfix not delivering to Maildir
  • Synchronize Tomboy Notes with Ubuntu One
  • How to run OpenSuse Mono 2.4.2.1 vmx imgae in vmware 1.0.9
  • The Backslash: helping Linux users ignore things
  • Creating Your Own SuperKaramba Themes
  • howto compile kernel in Debian 5.0
  • How to build a textbox URL shortener with PyGTK+
  • Recover your lost root password in Linux
  • Open and edit PDF files in OpenOffice
  • How to Install Ubuntu in Windows
  • How to Speed up Your Linux PC

Stupid UNIX man tricks

Filed under
Linux

UNIX has hundreds if not thousands of commands, and it's impossible to remember every option and nuance. But, happily, you don't have to: man, UNIX's built-in, online reference system, is man's best friend. Take a look at this shortcut guide to the UNIX man pages system.

Re-comparing file systems

log.amitshah.net: The previous attempt at comparing file systems based on the ability to allocate large files and zero them met with some interesting feedback. I was asked why I didn't add reiserfs to the tests and also if I could test with larger files.

Get started with HomeBank

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: With HomeBank you can automate recurring transactions, set reminders for future transactions, assess your future account balance so you can plan your spending sprees and manage your expenses expertly.

Red Hat: 'We spend over $100 million a year to advance Linux'

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: Matthew Szulik, Red Hat's former CEO and current chairman, has been in semi-retirement for the past two years, but you'd never know it from listening to his interview with the BBC's Peter Day. Szulik, ever the revolutionary, talks up open source's opportunity to disrupt conventional software and promote social reform.

Anonymous BitTorrent Using ItsHidden VPN

Filed under
Linux

ItsHidden is now offering a free VPN targeted at those who want to protect their privacy online. Named ItsHidden, the free VPN solution has opened up a BETA test to the public, who can now privatize their Internet traffic - including BitTorrent transfers - in next to no time.

Review: antiX M8.2 'Thasunke Witko'

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead: antiX is billed as a fast, lightweight Linux distro which is ideal for use on older hardware. It includes two window managers - IceWM (the default) and the excellent Fluxbox - plus the facility for using an iconified desktop through the Rox-Filer application.

LXDE 0.4.2 Review and Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: I am a big fan of light desktop environments. Well, most people looking for a lighter alternative normally settle for a lightweight window manager, such as Fluxbox or AwesomeWM.

Openoffice.org- The rise and rise of Open Source.

Filed under
OOo

sinaisix.blogspot: There is a storm that is taking the software industry by storm. The name of this storm is Free and Open Source and one of its flagship products is called Open Office.

GNOME, KDE, and Xfce: Which Desktop is Right for You?

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: How do you choose which GNU/Linux desktop to use? No easy answer exists, because the choice is so full of difficulties.

Review: New Linux Mint a Desktop Lightweight at Best

Filed under
Linux

newsfactor.com: Linux was making good strides in the desktop PC market before Windows 7 came out with the free-for-one-year Try Before You Buy RC1. So, can Linux hold on to the market share it easily took from Windows?

OpenGoo: An Open Source Answer To Google Apps

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: What's not to like about Google Apps? It has a ton of features, it's incredibly easy to collaborate with other people, and it's free. Well, how about the fact that your data is only as accessible as Google decides to make it?

VLC 1.0.1 is out!

Filed under
Linux

VideoLAN is pleased to announce the release of the second version of the Goldeneye branch of VLC: 1.0.1!

IBM, Novell to slash Linux prices for mainframes

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: With System z mainframe revenues down 39 per cent - and MIPS mainframe capacity shipments off 20 percent in the second quarter - IBM is keen on boosting mainframe sales. And it wants to use Linux as a lever.

Active Media Products Introduces Penguin Bootable Linux USB Drive

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

hartware.de: Active Media Products (AMP), manufacturer of SSDs and WWF series USB drives, today announced immediate availability of a bootable Linux USB (BLU) drive that is compatible with Windows® 7 and benefits WWF. These new penguin BLU drives are preloaded with the full installation of Ubuntu Linux 9.0.4.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming