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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story March of the penguins: how we migrate from UNIX to Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:18pm
Story Bitcoin Scoops Linux Media Award at CeBIT 2014 Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:16pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 9:14pm
Story This Open Source Coder Wants to be a Congressman Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 8:37pm
Story Google’s Chromecast Arriving In UK On 19 March Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Memset Urges Public Sector To Ditch VMware For Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 8:25pm
Story Introducing eppDater - GUI for Apt-Get Package Updates Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 3:57pm
Blog entry Signal-to-Noise Ratio Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 2:26pm
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 1:46pm
Story Measuring Success in an Open Source Project Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 7:02am

How (and Why) To Wrap Your Head Around Free Software Licensing

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OSS Open source software is being taken seriously as a viable alternative to expensive proprietary applications but it's important to realize that, like its commercial brethren, it comes with a license for use. It's also important to remember that all open source licensing is not created equal.

KDE compositing in openSUSE11.1

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SUSE As you might have noticed, KDE 4.1.3 has been released. The changelog part for KWin has just one change worth mentioning. But that is not the case for users of the openSUSE KDE:KDE4:Factory:Desktop packages.

How to ensure that your distribution gets rave reviews

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Linux Companies which sell GNU/Linux distributions could increase the profile and sales of their products in one way: install them on top-tier laptops, tune them up so that everything runs like a dream and then hand them out to those who write about GNU/Linux.

First Programming Language - Python/Ruby?

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Software A little while ago we had an interesting discussion on what programming language should be taught to CS majors. I think that overwhelming number of people agreed that C++ is a solid choice because provides students with a very solid, low level background.

Booting Debian in 14 seconds

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Linux Many readers will have heard about Arjan van de Ven and Auke Kok's work to boot an ASUS Eee 901 in 5 seconds. Inspired by this work, and because I have the same laptop, I decided to try to reproduce their results. So far I have not come very close to their 5 seconds, but I have made some significant improvements.

Go-oo: A Lighter, Faster OpenOffice, With Extras

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OOo One of the main complaints about the open source suite of productivity applications is that the applications are slow compared to the comparable Microsoft Office apps. If you've run into this problem, try Go-oo.

The Future of C++

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theunixgeek.blogspot: Bjarne Stroustrup began C with Classes in 1979, as a better C that supports object-oriented programming, generic programming, and data abstraction. In 1983, it became C++. Nearing the end of the century, 1998, a C++ ANSI-ISO standard was created. Sometime in the near future, C++0x is coming along.

Free as in beer, but what about the liver transplant?

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bushweed.blogspot: When it comes to business, it's all about cost. Software is certainly no exception. From a business point of view, what does free software mean? If it's just free, and i'll maintain the simile of free beer, why isn't every art department using Blender or Gimp?

The top 10 greatest geeks of all time Often unsung and underappreciated, their own personalities or lifestyles usually keep them from gaining greater public recognition. With so many great minds to choose from, it was all but impossible to narrow this list down to ten but after considerable argument we’re managed it.

Ubuntu vs OS X: The deathmatch

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regebro.wordpress: As you may have seen from my recent posts I’m trying out OS X. There is no doubt that for the casual computer users viewpoint OS X kicks Linux’s ass. But I’m a open source computer programmer, and for us things are definitely not as clear cut. Five years ago, they probably would have been, but then Ubuntu arrived.

SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop Featured on 60 minutes

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SUSE For anyone who was paying attention to this weeks 60 Minutes episode on CBS, you may have seen a clip of the HP 2133 Mini-Note PC with a SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop sticker on it!

Linux software installation myths

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blogs.computerworld: In a recent story about Microsoft running scared of Linux, I got a lot of mail saying things like, "when installing programs becomes as easy as Windows then Microsoft will be in trouble....most people couldn't be bothered stuffing around trying to find programs that will work and then figuring out how to install [them]." Ah, hello, it's actually easier to install software in Linux than it is in Windows.

Are Game Developers Finally Seeing the Linux Light?

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dthomasdigital.wordpress: In my last post one of the the feedback responses I received quipped that Linux was not ready for everyone. Among the many reason was that people wanted to play the latest games and that the latest games don’t come on the Linux platform.

Windows 7 no threat to netbook Linux

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Linux I've been nonplussed the last few weeks as ordinarily sane compu-journalists opine that Windows 7 will somehow kill Linux on netbooks. This weekend, I had a chance to actually see XP running on an EEE 900, and I can tell you, Linux has nothing to fear from Redmond.

Could Mepis have been Ubuntu?

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Linux Today SimplyMepis is back and in full swing with a beta available of SimplyMepis 8, most people would never know this due to the incredible lack of media coverage. After all, Linux is never spoken of these days without the name Ubuntu accompanying it. With any luck, this article will work to change this.

5 very basic things Windows 7 still isn't any good at

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Microsoft I've noticed five issues so far that, though minor, leave me wondering if Microsoft is going to be able to pull off a really great OS by its projected mid-2009 release.

The Force Is With Red Hat

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Linux Red Hat has found a way to link open source with Star Wars. Sci-Fi Geeks across the galaxy must be celebrating. And Red Hat is set to more effectively navigate the digital entertainment universe. Here’s the scoop.

Top 10 Linux FUD Patterns, Part 8

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linuxfud.wordpress: Will the use of Linux void the manufacturer’s warranty of your computer hardware? This is one fear that prevents some people from making the leap to Linux, which is why it is on my Top 10 List of Linux FUD Patterns. The short answer is, it depends; however, there are steps that you can take to increase your probability of receiving service under a warranty.

ATI X.Org, Mesa Performance In Ubuntu

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Ubuntu Late last month we published system benchmarks of Ubuntu 7.04 through 8.10 and had found -- at least with the Intel notebook we were using -- that the performance had degraded with time. In our original article we hadn't focused much upon the graphics tests and we were just using ATI's binary driver, but per a request from Canonical's Bryce Harrington, we have carried out some open-source graphics tests on Ubuntu 7.04 through 8.10 and we started with the ATI performance.

Open Source -- Can It Innovate?

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OSS There's an argument commonly heard these days that open-source software is all very well for infrastructure or commodity software where the requirements are well-established, but that it can't really innovate. I laugh when I hear this.

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More in Tux Machines

New Cortex-M chips add ARMv8 and TrustZone

ARM launched its first Cortex-M MCUs with ARMv8-M and TrustZone security: the tiny, low-power Cortex-M23 and faster Cortex-M33. At the ARM TechCon show in Santa Clara, ARM unveiled two new Cortex-M microprocessors that will likely emerge as major Internet of Things workhorses over the coming decade, supplanting most existing Cortex-M designs. The Cortex-M23 and Cortex-M33 are also the first Cortex-M processors with ARMv8-M technology, enabling ARM TrustZone security, among other benefits. The TrustZone support is enabled via a new IoT-oriented CoreLink SIE-200 network-on-chip, which adds IP blocks on top of the AMBA 5 AHB5 interface. ARM also announced a TrustZone CryptoCell-312 technology for creating secure SoCs based on ARMv8-M. Read more

OpenStack in the Headlines

  • From OpenStack Summit, Red Hat Reports That the Deployment Era is Here
    As noted here yesterday, OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. A new study by 451 Research analysts shows that about 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. Meanwhile, in conjunction with OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Red Hat is out with very notable results from its polling of its OpenStack user base. Its study found that production deployments increased hugely in the last year, according to a survey of 150 information technology decision makers and professionals carried out by Red Hat.
  • You can run the same programs on 16 different OpenStack clouds
    Cloud companies like to talk about about how you can avoid vendor lock-in. And OpenStack just showed how to make it happen. Sixteen different vendors did a live demo at OpenStack Summit showing that you could run the same software stack on 16 separate OpenStack platforms.
  • ​Where OpenStack cloud is today and where it's going tomorrow
    The future looks bright for OpenStack -- according to 451 Research, OpenStack is growing rapidly to become a $5-billion-a-year cloud business. But obstacles still remain.
  • ​Mirantis OpenStack: The good news and the bad news
    Mirantis recently signed a major deal with NTT, but the company is also laying off some of its employees.
  • The World Runs on OpenStack
    The OpenStack Summit keynotes got underway the morning of October 25, with Mark Collier, Chief Operating Officer of the OpenStack Foundation, declaring that the world runs on OpenStack.
  • Study: OpenStack is Marching Forward in Enterprises
    How fast is the OpenStack global cloud services market growing? Research and Markets analysts came out with a new report recently that forecasts the global OpenStack cloud market to grow at a CAGR of 30.49% during the period 2016-2020. Many enterprises now have large scale OpenStack deployments, and in conjunction with this week's OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, new study results are shedding light on exactly how entrenched this open cloud platform is in enteprises. The bottom line is: OpenStack is here to stay in enterprises. OpenStack deployments are getting bigger. Users are diversifying across industries. Enterprises report using the open source cloud software to support workloads that are critical to their businesses. These are among the findings in a recent study by 451 Research regarding OpenStack adoption among enterprise private cloud users. About 72 percent of OpenStack-based clouds are between 1,000 and 10,000 cores and three fourths choose OpenStack to increase operational efficiency and app deployment speed. The study was commissioned by the OpenStack Foundation. Here are some of the companies discussing their OpenStack deployments in Barcelona: Banco Santander, BBVA, CERN, China Mobile, Comcast, Constant Contact, Crowdstar, Deutsche Telekom, Folksam, Sky UK, Snapdeal, Swisscom, Telefonica, Verizon, Volkswagen, and Walmart. You can find some of the specific deployment stories from the companies at the OpenStack User Stories page.

Alpine Linux 3.4.5 released

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.4.5 of its Alpine Linux operating system. This is a bugfix release of the v3.4 musl based branch, based on linux-4.4.27 kernels and it contains important security fixes for the kernel and for musl libc. Read more

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