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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 26 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Five new features in Ubuntu 12.10 Beta 1 srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 2:06am
Story What’s going on with GNOME? srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:52pm
Story What to prepare before installing Arch Linux the first time srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:48pm
Story Be wary of LibreOffice 3.6 srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:42pm
Story Meet the Raspberry Pi Supercomputer--with Lego! srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:39pm
Story I will teach you C srlinuxx 1 12/09/2012 - 10:30pm
Story Review: openSUSE 12.2 KDE srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:28pm
Story Linux Platform Option Appears on Steam Website srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:27pm
Story A platform for everyone srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 7:31pm
Story VectorLinux: A Desktop That's Slim, Sleek and Speedy srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 7:30pm

OpenOffice.org Extensions: Writer's Tools

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: As the name suggests, Writer's Tools is a collection of various utilities that might be useful for writers. It's a little rough in places, being only at version 0.9.27, and possibly a little idiosyncratic, but like Emacs, Writer's Tools is so varied that it undoubtedly has something for everyone, regardless of their writing habits.

Is Linux Really Outgrowing Its Stereotypes? Does It Matter?

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: Last month distro-review ran an article titled 10 ways that Linux is outgrowing the stereotype and becoming the best OS. While I agreed with all 10 points in the article something just didn’t sit right with me. I bookmarked the article and gave it a good long think. My conclusion: the facts are correct but there are problems with both the premise and the goal of the article.

Does any open source media player stand a chance?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Gnash certainly hopes so. Gnash is an open source Flash player, being developed under the GPL. Currently available only for Linux versions such as embedded GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD, they’re working on a Windows port.

In Response to User Demand, Pidgin Forks

Filed under
Software

blog.wired.com: Version 2.4.1 made some improvements, but meanwhile the project has forked. A set of developers have created Funpidgin is a version of Pidgin with a manually resizable input box and four other additional features so far.

KDE and GNOME Buddy Up

Filed under
Software

practical-tech.com: Who would have believed it in 2004? KDE and GNOME, the two major Linux desktop interfaces, buddying up and having their annual meetings together? It would have been easier to believe in cats and dogs signing a permanent peace treaty. Believe it.

Why *I* like Linux and Unix

Filed under
Linux

aplawrence.com: There's plenty of stuff out there that tells you why you should embrace Linux and make it your own. That's not what this is: if you want to run Windows, go ahead. You may be perfectly happy. So why?

Reiser's future now in hands of jury

Filed under
Reiser

mercurynews.com: The fate of 44-year-old computer engineer Hans Reiser, who is accused of murdering his wife, now rests with the jury. The prosecution finished its rebuttal in the closing arguments to his trial Monday morning.

Free Software Magazine Awards 2008

Filed under
Misc

Nominate your entries for Free Software Magazine Awards 2008! To nominate a project, a person or a site, just leave a comment under this story or send an email with subject “Awards” to:

Distro Rankings and Popularity Ratings through the Years

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Have you ever wondered which Linux distribution was most popular during the previous years? If you have, then you may be interested in some of the data that I’m going to present to you. We shall find out which distro had the most number of followers in the past. Here it goes:

Open source conference co-locates with Ubuntu show

Filed under
OSS

linuxdevices.com: Registration is open for the tenth annual edition of OSCON (Open Source Convention), as well as for a co-located Ubuntu Live conference. Scheduled for Jul. 21-25 in Portland, Ore., O'Reilly's OSCON 2008 is expected to draw some 2,500 open source experts, visionaries, and hackers.

Ulteo releases Linux desktop; bent on world dominatio

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: When we last left our favorite evil geniuses at Ulteo, they were diligently plugging away at making OpenOffice.org applications accessible through a browser. Now, they've taken their plans for global domination one step further with Ulteo Application System.

Damn Small 4.3: Damn Fast, too

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Damn Small Linux has traditionally been my favorite of the ultra-light distributions. Its contemporaries (Puppy, etc.) are very capable, but for some reason I've always had a special place for DSL.

Hands on With Wubi

Filed under
Ubuntu

foogazi.com: For what Wubi claims to be able to do, I’m somewhat surprised that I haven’t heard more about it. Basically, you can install Ubuntu from Windows and then boot to Linux or Windows without having to do any kind of Grub trickery or anything.

A quick look at the spring GNU/Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: It’s really the most wonderful time of the year. Out of the top 6 GNU/Linux distributions (according to DistroWatch.com), four are releasing or have released builds between April and June. What’s new in Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora, and openSUSE?

Why Open Source Software Developers are Good Marketers

Filed under
Software

As I looked introspectively into these stories I wondered how relevant they were. I came to a realization that while the one of the most commonly espoused virtues of open source is more eyeballs generating better code that perhaps one of the least mentioned strengths is their marketing ability.

Eleven Tips for New Xfce Users

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: Last year's DesktopLinux.com's survey showed Xfce was the third most popular desktop environment. If you want to investigate Xfce, what you want to watch for are the features that are either unique or else essential or hard to find, like the ones listed below. They may just tip your decision about which desktop to use.

The X300 Review, Part 2: Running Ubuntu Hardy

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

redmonk.com: Previously, on tecosystems: part 1 of our intrepid review of the X300, wherein we say nice things about Lenovo’s latest effort. Linux is my preferred desktop operating system. So, by popular request, the rundown on running Linux on the X300.

Fedora goes to a community-dominated board

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: Fedora project leader Paul Frields has announced a change in the way the Fedora board is elected; as of the upcoming election, five of the nine seets will be elected by the community, while four will be appointed by Red Hat. So Red Hat will no longer select a majority of the board.

GNOME 2.24 Excitement Begins Tomorrow

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: GNOME 2.22.0 was only released last month, but being released tomorrow is the first development release in the path towards GNOME 2.24.0. This first development release will be dubbed GNOME 2.23.1, with GNOME 2.23 being the unstable branch.

Exciting arcade action in glorious ASCII

Filed under
Gaming

marcelgagne.com: Low tech games for a high tech world . . . Who says you need a fancy high-end graphics card to play some great Linux games? Heck, who says you need graphics at all?

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Rust 1.9

  • Announcing Rust 1.9
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.9. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.9 Released
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Announcing the Open Source License API

Over the last 19 years, the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has been the steward of the Open Source Definition (or OSD), establishing a common language when discussing what it means to be an Open Source license, and a list of licenses which are known to be compatible with the OSD. This is taken to its logic next step this year, with the OSI providing a machine readable publication of OSI approved licenses at api.opensource.org. This will allow third parties to become license-aware, and give organizations the ability to clearly determine if a license is, in fact, an Open Source license, from the authoritative source regarding Open Source licenses, the OSI. Read more

Leftovers: Gaming

Win for APIs and FOSS (Android Case)

  • Google beats Oracle at trial: Jury finds Android is “fair use”
    Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google's Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by "fair use." The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations. "Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, listen to your verdict as it will stand recorded," said the court clerk, before polling each of the ten men and women on the jury. There was only one question on the special verdict form, asking if Google's use of the Java APIs was a "fair use" under copyright law. The jury unanimously answered "yes," in Google's favor. The verdict ends the trial, which began earlier this month. If Oracle had won, the same jury would have gone into a "damages phase" to determine how much Google should pay. Because Google won, the trial is over. "I salute you for your extreme hard work in this case," said US District Judge William Alsup, who has overseen the litigation since 2010. "With the thanks of your United States District Court, you are now discharged. I would like to come in the jury room and shake each of your hands individually." Four of the ten jurors declined to comment to reporters gathered in the hallway. The other six went out through a back exit. "We're grateful for the jury's verdict," said Google lead lawyer Robert Van Nest before getting into the elevator with Google's in-house lawyers. "That's it." Oracle attorneys had no comment.
  • Google wins Oracle copyright fight over Android code
    Today, a jury in California's Northern District federal court declared that Google's use of copyright-protected code in Android was fair use, freeing it of any liability. Oracle, which controls the copyright on the code, had been seeking $9 billion for the use of the code. The case centers around an API developed by Java and owned by Oracle, which allows outside programs to easily interact with Java programs. Android uses the same API, and in 2014 a federal appeals court ruled that Oracle has a valid copyright claim on the API code, potentially putting Google on the hook for billions of dollars in damages. (The Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal.) In the latest round, Google argued that Android's reimplementation of the API constituted fair use, which would allow use of the code without invalidating Oracle's copyright. Ultimately, the jury found that case convincing.