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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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5 Least Popular Desktop Environments for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: KDE, GNOME, and Xfce are without doubt the most well-known desktop environments for Linux at the moment. They are utilized by majority of Linux Distributions simply because they are very much stable and usable. But did you know that there are other capable Free and Open-source desktop environments that you probably haven’t heard of?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Learning Linux Chmod Using Numbers

  • Linux - Getting the Correct Time
  • BASH: Prepend A Text / Lines To a File
  • How to set Virtual Box in Full screen Mode?
  • Optimizing the Ubuntu Boot Process

few bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Mint Linux, working straight out of the box

  • Ubuntu 8.04.1 on my Aspire One
  • Ubuntu On My Macbook

5 Most Underrated Linux Apps

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: FOSS is evolving. Computers are getting faster and cheaper. Nowadays, even open source software has a lot of internal competition, and with more processing power, developers are now able to churn out feature-rich applications. But do we need them?

Dell/Ubuntu Inspiron 1525 Review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

marksitblog.blogspot: I recently purchased a new Dell 1525 laptop running Ubuntu 8.04. I've been in need of a new laptop for about a year, and decided to take the plunge and see how good a Linux based laptop from Dell really is.

What Ubuntu 8.10 SHOULD look like

Filed under
Ubuntu

lunduke.com: This is just a mockup that someone put together for a possible look and feel for the next Ubuntu release (Intrepid Ibex), which is due out in October. But. Wow. Yes. This is what Ubuntu should look like.

GNU/Linux and thin-clients across the school

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Garry Saddington is ICT co-ordinator at Skegness Grammar School. The school uses a very wide range of free and open source applications – in fact all of the curriculum requirements are met through free software.

Finding tabs with the awesome bar?

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: If it’s not rare for you to have 20, 30 or 40 tabs opened at a time, you know how much of a burden it can be to get back to the one you need.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • CentOS position on systems intrusion at Red Hat

  • Using Elisa as your Ubuntu media center
  • Nessus Vulnerability Scanner in openSUSE
  • Empathize!
  • More Weekend Humor Of The Linux and Unix Variety
  • Has the Microsoft-Novell SUSE Certificates Affected Linux Virtualization Support?
  • Realizing the Promise of UC with Open Source
  • Using GNOME on a Small Screen
  • Open Source: The Key to a Software Meritocracy
  • OLPC kits out entire nation's kids with laptops
  • 9 Tips to Use Apachectl and Httpd like a Power User
  • 12 Resources for Free Open Source Tutorials and Tools
  • IT needs to retool tech workers for Linux growth

Demo Video of the XFCE Pre-seed

Filed under
Software

blog.ibeentoubuntu: The video shows the following: The Iceweasel brwser with Flash and Java plugins, The Thunar file manager with XDG directories, and Double-clicking an audio file to play it in MPlayer.

Also: Demo Video of the Gnome Pre-seed

New Adept coming for KDE

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: Next week is feature freeze in Ubuntu land, so we are working hard on filling the distros with the necessary features. We got a new Adept in thanks to the excellent mornfall, so now people can install and upgrade and manage their packages again.

Netbook Prices Are Now Falling

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.nytimes: Personal computer maker Acer said Friday morning it is cutting the price of its Aspire “netbook” to $349 from $399. It’s cutting the price of another netbook, the Linpus Linux Lite, to $329 from $379. None too soon.

FLA for KDE

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: In case you missed it, the membership of KDE e.V. have adopted a new legal instrument: a Fiduciary License Agreement. So ... what does it mean?

ubuntu headlines

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 release hour by hour

  • Dell Mini Inspiron caught running Ubuntu in the wild
  • In defense of Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu? No thanks
  • Installing virtualbox on Ubuntu
  • Installing and Configuration Ubuntu Samba Server
  • Ubuntu Love Day Manila 2008
  • Ubuntu Linux Bloggers Wanted

Novell and Microsoft: Stop with the FUD already

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

blogs.computerworld: Unlike a lot of open-source supporters, I don't turn red with anger at the very thought of Novell working with Microsoft. Like it or not, getting Linux and Windows to work better together makes good, hard business sense. What I do find annoying is that Novell is continuing to feed Microsoft's FUD machine about Linux.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 35

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #35 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: openSUSE 11.1 Alpha2 is available, Linux Distribution Popularity Across the Globe, and openSUSE to add SELinux Basic Enablement in 11.1.

OpenOffice.org Impress: Using Master Slides

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: The Master view in Impress is the equivalent of page styles in Writer. It's the view where you can set elements of design that appear throughout your presentation, such as the slide background and foreground colors, any reoccurring elements, and the fonts. By creating the master slides you need before you add content, you can automate your work and free yourself to focus on content.

FOSS Is More Valuable Than $60 Billion

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: So let me tell you how my day went. It started at 7am on my back deck. I usually start my workday there when the weather is nice. It's cool, the bugs aren't awake yet, and it's just plain nice to be outside.

Oops! I Fixed the Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: When Linux crashes, users don't get a Blue Screen like they do on Windows. Instead, Linux generates an "oops" -- a crash signature that can help developers to figure out what went wrong. The feature may have a silly name, but it's increasingly serious business.

How do we attract the next generation?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Once upon a time, Red Hat did sell its software in a shrink wrapped box and you could find it on the shelf next to Windows98. But that was then and this is now. What are we doing to expose new users to Linux and Open Source solutions?

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More in Tux Machines

University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more